My mom got the Whipple done today after 9 long months of intensive chemo and radiation. After a 10 hour procedure, the surgeon just came out and told me that she is cancer free!

This was a video I had posted 5 months ago of the first 5 months of her fight. I never thought today would come.

https://youtu.be/qXmFUXGBLwQ

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πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ“…︎ Aug 06 2020
🚨︎ report
We were optimistic after my mom had Whipple procedure

About a month ago she was diagnosed with cancer in the duodenum. After anguishing 8 hours of surgery they said it was successful, clear edges. A week after we were back home, she recoverd like a champ. She still had some trouble eating but she made threw the days.

When we went to the oncologist to start talking about the chemo therapy he said that she is Stage 3, 12 out of 17 lymph nodes were infected, but non the less he said that there is actual chance of healing.

Fast forward 3 week we are back in the hospital, again blocked intestines.

The cancer has spread to her abdomen.

Fuck this shit.

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πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/NihilistDouche
πŸ“…︎ Jul 16 2020
🚨︎ report
My whipple procedure is this Thursday

Hey just wanted to keep everyone updated that has been following my story I have my whipple operation this coming Thursday

I will keep everyone updated just as soon I can

It might take a few days or more to recover though if everything goes good and no complications. I'll do my best

I will be busy these next couple days getting everything ready before my surgery and my hospital stay

I hope everyone else is doing ok and doing there best to beat this disease keep up the good fight !!

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πŸ“°︎ r/pancreatitis
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πŸ‘€︎ u/man-of-stihl
πŸ“…︎ Jan 13 2020
🚨︎ report
How is Stihlman, the guy who had the Whipple procedure?

Dear Stihlman, I hope your doing well and healing fast. How are you feeling after your surgery because there has been no updates on your condition. Lots of prayers and good wishes going your way!

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πŸ“°︎ r/pancreatitis
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Albert19777
πŸ“…︎ Feb 02 2020
🚨︎ report
Whipple procedure

Recently diagnosed with cancer, I am facing a Whipple procedure next Friday. Anyone have this, or know someone who has had this procedure? Trying to stay strong and positive.

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πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Markbert690
πŸ“…︎ Sep 13 2019
🚨︎ report
Whipple procedure
πŸ‘︎ 750
πŸ“°︎ r/medizzy
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Surgeox
πŸ“…︎ Mar 14 2019
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Diabetes after Whipple procedure?

Hi all! Currently in my oncology rotation and learning about the Whipple procedure. I'm curious, if a segment of the pancreas is being removed, is this going to affect the body's ability to adequately produce insulin and lead to diabetes/diabetes like symptoms? My preceptor has not seen this before in patients, but we both agree that it would make sense on paper and are curious! Just wondering if anyone has any insight or resources on this!!

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πŸ“°︎ r/dietetics
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πŸ“…︎ Jan 14 2020
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I’m about to go observe a Whipple procedure for the first time! Any questions you guys want me to ask?
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πŸ“°︎ r/premed
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Maxipad13
πŸ“…︎ Dec 05 2018
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Has anyone had a "Whipple" procedure?

I found out today I'm having this surgery for chronic pancreatitis. The thought of this is very intimidating as it's considered one of the most difficult, invasive, and painful surgeries with a lengthy recovery. It involves removing most of my pancreas, my gall bladder and a portion of my small intestines. I hope it stops the intense and perpetual abdomen pain I've had for years. I would love to hear anyone's experience with it.

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πŸ“°︎ r/ChronicPain
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Seethist
πŸ“…︎ Jan 08 2018
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How safe is the Whipple Procedure in patients who DO NOT have cancer?

My dad recently found out that there's been this growth on his pancreas that's been showing up on scans when he would get kidney stones. Even though doctors first made a note of it almost a decade ago, I guess they didn't think it was any sort of risk since no one even mentioned it to him. But after his most recent bout with kidney stones, they decided to biopsy the growth (I assume that doctors are more worried nowadays since my dad's dad had died of pancreatic cancer in the time since the last scan). Although the biopsy showed that it's not cancerous, they think it might develop into cancer at some later point in the future. So they want to schedule a pancreaticoduodenectomy or "Whipple procedure", which I understand is a major surgery that removes several organs and/or parts of organs. Now here's the problem I'm having:

Almost all the information I can find about this procedure only discuses it's use with patients who already have cancer. For instance, some statistics say that 25% of patients end up dying within five years of the surgery. But I assume that that statistic is grossly inflated due to the majority of patients having cancer.

So my question is: how dangerous is the Whipple Procedure for a reasonably healthy man in the late 60s who does not have pancreatic cancer? And what can we expect after the surgery, (both during the immediate recovery, and also the long-term effects)?

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πŸ“°︎ r/AskDocs
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πŸ‘€︎ u/AttalusPius
πŸ“…︎ Feb 24 2017
🚨︎ report
Dropping my dad off for whipple today...

Haven't posted here before, mostly lurked for some more than valuable information and I'd love to thank each person that contributes here because it has helped so much through this, there is SO MUCH INFORMATION and having people condense that all here has been very helpful.

Anyway... my dad (73) was diagnosed in May, had been seen sick since December but didn't go in til March. It felt like it took forever to get answers and when we did... they sucked. He has two cancers, pancreatic and lung but were both detected early on (he was actually scheduled for the whipple sooner but they wanted to check some nodes in his chest to make sure neither had spread). He was lucky enough to be a candidate for the whipple procedure AND we are lucky that we live close enough to Stanford for that to be his place of care. The drs have been great... everyone has. Shout out to Sarah and Amanda K. who will never understand how helpful they have been through this.

As im typing this we are in the waiting room, waiting for the nurse to take him back. This is not the first time we've had to go through surgeries (hes had more than i can remember right now) but this is the biggest one he will have to date.

Not really sure why I'm posting as I have no information to share regarding this awful disease. But I see how supportive this community is and while I may not post i do see them and ive had many of you and your family members in my thoughts. I guess I'm just hoping that maybe as people are scrolling through this they'll take a second and send some good vibes our way. We could really use them.

Take care all. And mom... I know you lurk here too, haha. I love you and we will get through this.

πŸ‘︎ 9
πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/OMGitsKitty
πŸ“…︎ Sep 09 2020
🚨︎ report
Dad refusing to continue chemo Help.

Hello this is my first thread on reddit, this is my history im from Bolivia and my father was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer (adenocarcinoma) 2 months ago, i just did the CT in Bolivia then since my country is really underdeveloped in medicine TBH, i wanted to take him to USA so he could have a better treatment, but the COVID pandemic situation didn't let us (closed borders), then we had to opt for Chile (we wasted like 6 weeks after initial CT trying to get a flight), now he just finished his first session of Folfirinox and he was very optimistic before it, but now he cant deal with the symptoms of chemo mostly gastrointestinal (hiccups, constipation, malaise), so he decided to stop any next chemo session and he wants to comeback to Bolivia just to feel at home. Sincerely i don't know what to do, this moment my mother and I are with him, trying to support him, but i know if we comeback he will suffer much more from tumor growth than adverse effects also that the health system at my natal city is too limited and he will be very badly treated, but he cant understand that (even if we re radiologist). I know that PC has a high mortality but his last PET-CT reported a pancreatic mass involving mostly body (5cm), portomesenteric compromise, no arterial involvement, and suspicious cardiophrenic lymph node vs lung nodule, i think if he can finish chemo and have a Whipple procedure (as pancreatobiliary surgeon told us) maybe he can surpass this terrible situation. This situation severely depressed me, i love my dad and seeing him suffering like that destroys me. Please if someone can give me an advice i would be grateful. Sorry for my bad english since it isn't my first language.

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πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/L2W1390
πŸ“…︎ Sep 29 2020
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Dieticians of reddit, help my grandma.

When she was 15 my grandma (now 73) had stomach ulcers to the point where they had to remove 80% of her stomach, so she has historically has not been able to eat much, but she eats at a higher frequency of 8 small meals a day. This year she developed pancreatic cancer and had to have the majority of her pancreas removed through the whipple procedure. June 2nd she went into the hospital with 8 liters of fluid in her lungs and Congestive heart failure and was bed ridden for 2 months. It's a slow climb back to health for her but we are sincerely trying. I'm now a full-time live in assistant for her, and trying to juggle low sodium food, with her high protein diet that she requires (she lost 48 pounds in the hospital and is a meager 91.3lbs 5'2") it's hard to manage a healthy and consistent diet that will satisfy her. She still has an appetite thank God, but she is unable to stomach more than about 1/2 of a normal serving for her. What should I do in terms of diet?

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πŸ“°︎ r/AskDocs
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Bungholeinfection
πŸ“…︎ Sep 10 2020
🚨︎ report
My mom's battle

I'd like to share a story while I'm still trying to process my thoughts and as a step toward my goal of opening up to people more. It's going to be very long, so I couldn't fault anyone for not wanting to take the time to read it. However, I think this is going to be therapeutic for me, and in case it can help or prepare any of you for what might be the worst event of your lives, I'd like to make this public. I'm going to split the text into two sectionsβ€”"Background" and "Goodbye"β€”but you may skip to the second section immediately if you'd like. I can't guarantee that this write-up will be cohesive or completely lacking in terms of narrative holes, repetitive wording, continuity errors or other such shortcomingsβ€”especially toward the end. That being said, thank you for visiting this post even if you don't decide to read or comment.

Background

My mom, Elizabeth (or Ely for short), was diagnosed with cervical cancer in the summer of 2017. At the time, she seemed very positive about the diagnosis and it appeared as though treatment was ultimately effective. Celebration was short-lived, however, as my dad passed away in November of the same year.

Roughly two years later, completely out of nowhere, my mom's skin began to turn yellow. Of course, we figured it was some form of hepathitis, but having learned a lesson from my dad's reluctance to see a doctor and how that influenced his passing, mom immediately decided to visit the emergency room. After several attempts and re-attempts to be thoroughly examinedβ€”most of which were dismissed for whatever reasonβ€”she was able to secure a hospital bed and a full checkup. From this point on, the details started to get fuzzy, at least for me. In either case, we were told that they had found some unknown object obstructing her bile ducts, hence the jaundice. This was in October of 2019.

Owing to the lack of details that I mentioned earlier, as well as my complete lack of knowledge about medicine, I didn't understand exactly what would happen moving forward. At first, I figured that they'd just "go in there with a wire" and "pluck the thing out", but it eventually dawned on me that mom would be going into major surgeryβ€”an intervention that I later learned is called a "Whipple procedure". The surgery was a success, mom seemed to be recovering surprisingly quickly and after several weeks, she was finally back home. She was weak, she lost weight, but we were together and it seemed like the worst of it was over. It wasn't.

... keep reading on reddit ➑

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πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/King_Hoob
πŸ“…︎ Aug 17 2020
🚨︎ report
Post Whipple back pain

Hello Doctors of Reddit,

Back in 2017 I had a Whipple procedure done to get rid of a duodenal gangliocytic paraganglioma.

Back at home post op I found myself having intense back pain, the type that feels like someone stabbing a knife into your spine, directly in the spot where they had my epidural, between my shoulder blades. It made it so I could hardly breathe and basically keel over in pain. After maybe 20 minutes(what seemed like an eternity) I was able to breathe normally.

Since that time I have been getting the same pain periodically which I thought I had traced down to my consuming alcohol. Now with booze cut out I’m finding it still happens from time to time, but my doctor said there was nothing that looked or felt abnormal in the area I had described.

Three years later dealing with the pain is getting old, is there any possibility that something could have been injured in my spine when they put in the epidural or is this weird?

I am currently 31M if that helps. The doctor said I was the youngest person he has seen to get a Whipple so they weren’t really sure how the healing would go.

Any help would be appreciated.

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πŸ“°︎ r/AskDocs
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Sytir
πŸ“…︎ Sep 01 2020
🚨︎ report
Coronavirus and collateral damage to cancer patients

Cancer is hard enough, but with the health system strained from coronavirus/CoVid-19, cancer patients will become collateral damage in order to save healthier people. This epidemic is a crisis, and that demands sacrifices, but it's tragic that people who have gone through so much, surviving months or years of chemo, radiation, surgery, and more, will not get the care they need and deserve.

NYC hospitals now have a no visitor policy, unless the patient is end-of-life or incapacitated. Is your family member disabled, hard of hearing, or anxious? You can't help them. You can't be there. You just wait and hope they get out alive.

That's if they get in the hospital at all; beds have already become scarce, and soon people ill with CoVid-19 will take them. That doctor, that room, that equipment that would handle a whipple procedure or lung resection will now go towards a patient that needs a ventilator. Surgeries are already being deferred, and, if they're not, the patient must recover in an environment latent with infection. They can't win.

Radiation has converted to the shortest courses necessary. For example, a typically long radiation course for colorectal cancer has been reduced to 5 days to minimize office visits and exposure. Labs are closing indefinitely, delaying life-saving research. Doctors that normally request an office visit to help someone with, say, a neutropenic fever will err on the side of caution and have them stay home. Sometimes it won't be the right gamble.

Ultimately, lives will be shortened, lives will be lost. Not just by the hand of CoVid-19, but everything that comes with it. There will be a long tail of PTSD and anxiety for patients, caregivers, and healthcare workers when this is 'over'. I don't begrudge any institution for these choices, though I wish exceptions could be made. I simply lament what we'll lose.

πŸ‘︎ 91
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/cancer_athena
πŸ“…︎ Mar 21 2020
🚨︎ report
My Dad

I have been really struggling with this lately, so it is nice to see a group of people that understand and have been through what we are going through. I have known quite a few people that have gotten cancer, but for my Dad to get cancer has turned everything upside down.

My Dad was diagnosed with PC 3 months ago right before his 68th bday. He doesn't drink or smoke, and he has exercised regularly his entire life. He has always been bulletproof to me, and I have always looked up to him and tried to be like him my entire life. We also are business partners, so since his diagnosis he has not been working more than a few hours a week when he feels like it. This coupled with the Coronavirus quarantines has been devastating to our family, because it is suddenly on my shoulders along with the stress of business operations and having to let employees go and cut back on just about everything to keep from shutting down the business.

He has been looking for what the cause might have been so that he can blame something, like maybe if he hadn't worn his phone on his hip or if he hadn't eaten so much red meat or something like that, maybe he wouldn't have gotten the cancer. Who knows what caused it.

It just sucks, because the chances of survival are so low, but you also want to stay positive because your attitude helps so much in the healing and recovery process. Luckily we found it before it metasticized, but it is still Stage 3 because one of the veins by the pancreas is encased by the tumor. They wouldn't perform the Whipple procedure right away because of this, so he has done 6 rounds of chemo, and he lost about 60 pounds (from 210 to 150). He got into a clinical trial of radiation 5 days a week for a month that starts in a few weeks to see if they can shrink the tumor away from the vein so that they can resect it and hopefully get rid of the cancer. Even then, if the surgery goes perfectly, I read that there is a 50% chance that the cancer will come back within 8 months because of how nasty aggressive pancreatic adenocarcinoma is.

He has his bad days, but all he can really do at this point is make the most out of the time that he has and do the best with what he can control, which is his attitude and his relationships. My Mom is taking it harder than he is it seems. Her entire life is built to revolve around my Dad, and she seems to be more emotional and volatile than he is at the moment. I know there is a slim chance that he will make it through this just

... keep reading on reddit ➑

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πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Supercafoneplotta
πŸ“…︎ May 27 2020
🚨︎ report
TW - Bad outcome from a Whipple

TL;DR My 77 y/o dad died from the Whipple, has this happened to anyone else? Any words of comfort you can spare?

+++

Hi all, I struggled with whether to post this because I don't want to scare anyone but I am hoping to connect with people and maybe find some comfort.

My 77 y/o dad had a Whipple procedure after finding pancreatic cancer very early on a CAT scan that was intended to look at something else. The surgery was technically successful and he was recovering as expected in the hospital for more than a week. Then he had sudden bleeding that led to cardiac arrest and other complications. It took a while to get him back, and after weeks in the ICU seeing whether/how he could recover, we let him go on Saturday with my whole family by his side.

I love (still do, it doesn't go anywhere) my dad so much. Until this month, he was traveling regularly for fun (both internationally and across the country), spending lots of time with friends, and really living life to the fullest. I am trying to take comfort in the fact that his last years were very rich, full, happy, comfortable and fulfilling.

But I feel so bad that he had to go this way. He was node-negative and the tumor was not very large or complicated. We went to a very experienced surgeon at a world-renowned hospital in a major city. I know the Whipple is a complex procedure (I have another friend whose dad went this way, and he was younger than mine) but I understand this is a statistically uncommon outcome. I know sometimes pancreatic cancer comes back after the Whipple but I wish we even got that chance -- just for a few more months or years together.

I always expected Dad to live well into his 80s, and hoped for 90s. I also know many folks on here have loved ones who passed way earlier from pancreatic cancer than my dad did, and I want to believe we're lucky for the many years we had. I flew home to be with him before the surgery, just in case. It was a wonderful weekend together.

I apologize if I am scaring anyone out of what could be a life-saving or life-extending surgery. Again, this is a statistically uncommon outcome. I almost think my dad would have picked this (not throwing away his shot) over letting cancer take him without a fight. Everyone is different, and I do hope people ask doctors about the risk of complications like this and how age or other health factors might impact that, get second opinions if possible and take all of those factors into consideration.

If anyone has ha

... keep reading on reddit ➑

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πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/sadbrownie28
πŸ“…︎ Mar 25 2020
🚨︎ report
Dad is in septic shock

I’ve done so much googling and talking to doctors about what to expect from this, but I still feel completely lost. My Dad had a Whipple procedure done to fix chronic pancreatitis, got out of the hospital last Wednesday and by Saturday was in septic shock from a leak at the surgical sight. He has severe mental confusion and although his kidneys have not completely shut down, they aren’t functioning properly. His blood pressure was also dangerously low, which is being controlled by medication. He is also on a ventilator because of his confusion, they are worried about him ripping out IV’s and drain tubes. I am aware each case is different, but I guess I’m just wondering the chances of him recovering from this. Will it get worse before it gets better? I’m just lost and feel helpless.

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πŸ“°︎ r/sepsis
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πŸ‘€︎ u/AlliWal0506
πŸ“…︎ Feb 25 2020
🚨︎ report
Pancreatic cancer

This is what happen to her and I would like everyone to know about the Whipple Procedure complications and a mistake. . My wife had the Whipple Procedure it was robotic on July 31 2018 here a follow up 3 weeks later with a chemo consultation when she was on the doctors table for a exam doctor touch her belly was bloated and she nearly jump off the table because she was so bloated up , the doctor sent her to ER it took them 3 days to find out she had internal bleeding and took 5 units of blood by a nick in the main artery where the surgery was done at UI Health, . they repair it, She could of died,then 12 days at the hospital. then she started chemo then it was suppose to be her 3rd chemo session on Monday October 29th the mourning I found her on the family room floor she was incoherent so I called 911 she had a stroke and a heart attract..then 2 days after had to have emergency surgery had to remove all her small intestines and insert a pick line for TPN and 7 drainage tubes on her belly area the 78 days in 4 different hospitals with all these compilations after that nick in the artery we decided to take her home with Hospice what she wanted and passed away in my arms at home. on January 16 2019 My wife went through hell after that surgery if it was a clean Whipple Procedure she would be alive today. No one should suffer like my wife did because of a mistake at a robotic surgery.April 6th 2019 this year would of been our 51st anniversary and her 68th birthday.,that she never seen.

My life hasn't been the same as it was before January 16th this year when my lovely wife Vickie passed away at home in my arms because of complications from her major surgery ( Whipple Procedure ) last year July 29th 2018. We have been together for 50 + years and she is gone for good because of a error was made on her major surgery. This is wrong I was suppose to take care of her for the next 50 years of our lives , but it didn't happen.I think complications and a error are 2 different things.The hospital robotic equipment and the surgeon should be accountable for this.

https://preview.redd.it/8xng6m1smr741.jpg?width=539&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=c1d5cdf0f71c8026d2752fa1d972d4c1ca8ccf9f

πŸ‘︎ 2
πŸ“°︎ r/u_windpiper
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πŸ‘€︎ u/windpiper
πŸ“…︎ Dec 30 2019
🚨︎ report
Weekly Case Study - Test your knowledge

A 65 year old male patient is status post a Whipple procedure day # 1. He was treated for stage 1 pancreatic adenocarcinoma with the Whipple. In his ICU bed he has been extubated and is now on oxygen via nasal cannula. The NG tube placed intraoperatively is draining green fluid via suction. Do you need to notify the surgeon for this finding?

Why or why not defend your position.

As usual I will reply via direct messages so that people don’t get the answer early.

Please feel free to message me a topic you would like to see a case study on.

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πŸ“°︎ r/StudentNurse
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πŸ‘€︎ u/ronin_ab
πŸ“…︎ Mar 19 2020
🚨︎ report
Mom has pancreatic cancer recurrence a year after whipple - what to expect

Hi all. First thanks for this community, it's been helpful reading through everyone's posts. Second, I know nobody can really predict the future for my mom, but I would really appreciate any experience and/or strength you could share.

In September 2018 by mom went in diabetic ketoacidosis. We took her to the emergency room and they determined that not only did she have undiagnosed diabetes, she also had a small tumor on her pancreas. She had the whipple procedure done in November 2018, and even though scans were clean afterwards, she went through radiation and chemotherapy from January through July. It was a really brutal several months of treatment, but a week after she completed the treatment she felt fine. Scan in August 2019 came up clear. Two weeks ago she went in for another checkup and due to elevated tumor markers they did another scan and found another tumor on her pancreas.

In the doctor's words they have subjected her to the most rigorous treatment they can and it didn't work. He didn't want to talk timelines but when pushed he would only say she probably won't die this year. They are starting her on another chemo/radiation round of treatment, but it feels like this is just to give her some more time.

Obviously the whole situation is difficult for me to wrap my head around, since all the other post-whipple recurrence stories I read are advanced stage situations, with the cancer having spread to other organs or parts of the body. As far as I know this isn't the case but it's possible my parents are shielding me from information, although I doubt that since they've been very up front with me about everything up until this point.

My mom physically feels great. No significant weight fluctuations, and she is digesting all of her food well. I would love to read anybody's experience with a similar situation. Honestly if the doctor hadn't of been so pessimistic i would have thought mom still had a fighting chance, given the small size of the tumor and no spreading. But I'm sure in my head I'm just doing everything to convince myself that i won't lose my mom in the next couple of years.

Thanks in advance for any comments you can provide.

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πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/postjack
πŸ“…︎ Feb 24 2020
🚨︎ report
Hey I have a whipple surgery coming up

Hello and merry christmas and happy holidays to everyone!

I just wanted to say I have been through a lot this 70 lbs weight loss this year 5 ercps for pancreas stents plus gallbladder removal and hospitalizations over pancreatitis in 2019 just to name some things I have been posting my story here along the way in these pancreatitis forums

I have been seeing a oncologist and he has got me scheduled for a whipple procedure so hopefully it will help with some of the pain and nausea that I always have

I just wanted to update everyone that has been following my story. Also if anyone has had the whipple done fell free to comment and let me know what I am going to be up against when it comes to recovery or life after the procedure.

I hope everyone else is doing ok and doing there best to beat this disease keep up the good fight !

πŸ‘︎ 4
πŸ“°︎ r/pancreatitis
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πŸ‘€︎ u/man-of-stihl
πŸ“…︎ Dec 18 2019
🚨︎ report
Health Insurance Co denying needed treatment for pancreatic tumor

I have a 3 cm tumor on my pancreas. I am getting treatment at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas. I live in Texas. Pancreatic cancer treatment is a highly specific field and my doctor is one of the top five doctors in the world.

Essentially, my doctor did a biopsy in December on it and told me to come back in March for him to take another look. When I went in March, he told me that in the three months since December, my tumor had DOUBLED in size and the wall of the tumor had started to change, which highly unusual and is a sign that the tumor is rapidly progressing. My blood work however, was still fairly normal. Because the only treatment for me involves him doing a surgery called The Whipple Procedure (removing six of my organs and rerouting my entire digestive tract), he wanted to take a wait and see approach and wanted me to come back in 2-3 to have him take another look at what it has done. He very specifically told me that I cannot wait to see him any longer than 2-3 months, and made me promise I would attend that appointment. I have been on pins and needles since March wondering what it is doing. I am also very sick with all kinds of symptoms. Of course, I cannot go to a regular doctor for help..they stand there and look at me and say "Your diagnosis is above my pay grade. I don't know how to help you. Call your MD Anderson team."

However, some RN Case Manager at Cigna, my health insurance company, has now decided that my tumor is not "big enough" so my appointment and scans with my doctor are "not needed". They are refusing to authorize my scans/bloodwork/cat scans, despite a MD saying they are urgently needed, and as a result, MD Anderson has cancelled all of my appointments leaving me completely without any medical care. They claim they know better than an MD Anderson Pancreatic Surgeon and I only need to see him once a year. LOL. It's INSANE.

Curious if you guys have any idea about my rights? I have been on the phone with them screaming bloody murder for a week and it's like talking to a brick wall. They refuse to budge. My doctor even called up there and told them they were making a huge mistake and didn't understand they were putting me life at significant risk. They told HIM no. It's very important that I get in quickly. If this thing is spreading, I will be dead in a matter of months. I do not exaggerate when I say there is a ticking time bomb sitting on my pancreas right now. I have considered filing an appe

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πŸ‘︎ 522
πŸ“°︎ r/legaladvice
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πŸ‘€︎ u/GadgetQueen
πŸ“…︎ Jun 06 2019
🚨︎ report
Father was just diagnosed

My dad has had health concerns for a few months. He went to his physician and had bloodwork done. Numbers came back high. He got a CAT scan. Everything seemed normal. Something was blocking a duct from his gull bladder blocking everything up from his liver. They snaked a tube down his throat and discovered it's a tumor. It's being tested now and an 80% chance its cancerous. Hes had like 5 tests done just today. He was admitted to the hospital. They put an external tube in him to clear out the backup. He needs to be strong enough for this surgery where they take out organs and get the tumor then out everything back.

Tl/dr Dad has tumor in bile duct. Having whipple procedure and remove tumor.

Anyone know of this problem? How serious is it? Basically: is my dad dying. Very somber I know. Please help.

πŸ‘︎ 20
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/smokeybandit_ovo
πŸ“…︎ Jul 24 2019
🚨︎ report
Update on my pancreas condition

Hey I hope everyone is doing ok and pain free today and beating this disease !

I also hope everyone had the best Thanksgiving possible.

I went to the dr last week my gi dr referred me before to a cancer surgeon a oncologist does surgeries of the gastrointestinal tract.
stomach dr-surgeon

So I went and saw the cancer dr and he tells me I am going to need a whipple procedure in the near future after the holidays possibly january or February

I am going for my 5th ercp next week this year and the stents aren't helping me and the oncologist said those was just temporary anyways

I mentioned to him that my inflammation started in the tail of my pancreas so he wants me to come get a new scan on december 11th to see all the changes in my pancreas since the last scan I had a few months ago

He said if the inflammation was also still in the tail then I would possibly have to get a total pancreatectomy so December 11th I'll know more because I have another appointment to go see him after that scan

He basically said my pancreas is made weird and is not like everyone else's pancreas said the ducts in my pancreas will never meet so it can drain properly

I dont have cancer but he said I am very high risk and said I need to have this surgery before it does lead and possibly turn into cancer

So to sum it up

I have chronic pancreatitis

I have lost 70lbs this year

I have had gallbladder removal this year

I am going for my 5th ercp next week for this year for a stent there just temporary pain relief basicially how I was explained

Going december 11th to get a ct scan and talk to oncologist aboutwhipple-total pancreatomy

So that's kind of where I am at. I just wanted to update everyone that has been following this story of mine

πŸ‘︎ 6
πŸ“°︎ r/pancreatitis
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πŸ‘€︎ u/man-of-stihl
πŸ“…︎ Dec 01 2019
🚨︎ report
Tongue Surgery

On 9/19/2018 I was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. I had the Whipple Procedure to have it removed. We caught it so early it was small and easy to remove, well, easy relative to Whipple. I've been NED (no evidence of disease) since then, until now.

I went to my dentist to get a general treatment plan. I left with an impromptu biopsy on the side of my tongue that hurt like hell!!! Turns out, I have severe epithelial dysplasia, a precancerous lesion on my tongue that I have to get removed so it doesn't become a problem. I'm nervous about it--not really about the procedure or recovery so much as I'm worried they may find more problems in my mouth. Cancer paranoia is coming down hard on me.

I don't even know why I'm writing this. Maybe if you have suggestions for post-op care and eating after having skin scraped off the side of your tongue, let me know!

πŸ‘︎ 13
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/tacosarelove
πŸ“…︎ Jan 31 2020
🚨︎ report
Stage 3 periampullary diagnosis for my brother in law

He just received the diagnosis today. He was diagnosed with duodenum cancer in November and had the whipple procedure done. After pathology from the procedure they said the cancer had originated in the ampulla of the pancreas and spread to the duodenum. Has anyone dealt with this cancer? I know its very rare and there hasn't been a lot of research or tests done with it. It sounds bad and the survival rate is low. He is starting 6 months of chemo at the end of the month.

πŸ‘︎ 8
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/riverside5151
πŸ“…︎ Jan 03 2020
🚨︎ report
Had my 4th ercp this year today

Hey I hope everyone is doing ok and beating this disease

I had my 4th ercp done today they took one of my old stents out and replaced it with a new larger one to keep stretching it and opening up my duct from pancreas divisum-chronic pancreatitis

I did notice they attempted minor papilla cannulation but wasnt successful on that part

They said they was going to do all they can to try and help me like I said this makes my fourth ercp this year and have also had my gallbladder out last month in september

They said once they have done all they can with the stents and stretching open my ducts the dr told me a whipple procedure would be my last resort if I can't get no relief from anything else

I hope it doesn't have to come to that though. My paperwork said I will go back in 6-8 weeks to change my stent again and repeat the minor papilla cannulation.

So there is a update about myself its been awhile since I have posted

Enough about me how is everyone else doing ?

πŸ‘︎ 6
πŸ“°︎ r/pancreatitis
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πŸ‘€︎ u/man-of-stihl
πŸ“…︎ Oct 28 2019
🚨︎ report
Questions for Oncologist

My [27F] mom [53F] was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and hospitalized for the first time at the end of August. In September she had the Whipple procedure and is recovering fairly well from that. Her tumor was completely removed and we are looking at clear margins. Our family feels like a major hurdle is behind us, but we know there is still so much to face. I am extremely grateful for this subreddit and the resources from pancan.org. It helps to not feel so alone in this mess.

Mom is meeting with an oncologist in a couple weeks to move forward with chemo and possibly some targeted radiation. This process feels overwhelming to all of us and I’m curious what specific questions we should ask the oncologist to help us understand what’s ahead. I’d love to hear about your experiences and I welcome your advice. My mom is terrified of chemotherapy.

πŸ‘︎ 7
πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/sharamighty
πŸ“…︎ Oct 17 2019
🚨︎ report
What is the prognosis of metastatic pancreatic cancer that has spread to the lungs, I feel as though my parents are withholding information to me to protect me.

My mom (56) was diagnosed with PC in May, they initially thought the tumor would be respectable with the whipped but wanted to do adjunctive chemotherapy so she started to do 4 rounds of 4fu, she got so sick and weak they had to stop treatment for a month, during that month we got a ct scan that showed that her tumor had shrunk but later we actually found out it really hadn’t shrunk and her ca19 levels had almost doubled. She then got into a clinical trial that combined gencitobine and abraxen with radiation. After a hospital admission last Thursday due to extreme stomach cramping, they ran CT’s, X-rays, and other tests in which they found tumors in her lungs. This is absolutely heartbreaking and I don’t truly understand what this all means long term. I know she is now seeing a pain therapist so they are trying to make her as comfortable as possible. They are starting gencitobine and abraxen without radiation next Thursday. I am away at college and just begun my senior year, my sisters are all away at college as well so it’s just my parents going to these appointments and they are not the best at explaining what the doctors say. While I was home this summer I went to every appointment and hospital trip so I could understand what was happening. Now I am afraid my parents are withholding the truth to how serious this new diagnosis is because they want all my sisters and I to stay in school. I would just like to know what this new diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic cancer to the lungs means for the future, will she still be able to have the Whipple procedure? Does this mean that the cancer is now terminal and they are just trying to extend her life? Any information or advice that you all can give me would be greatly appreciated.

πŸ‘︎ 5
πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/imissuuuuu
πŸ“…︎ Aug 27 2019
🚨︎ report
My mom has cancer and I need help navigating Fraser Health and getting her help.

I’m posting this with a bunch of what is likely extraneous information in the hopes somebody has had similar experiences and can help guide me, or at the very least nod their head and say β€œyup that sucks”. Bolded the actual question near the bottom and a tl;dr at the end.

In January, during one of my mom’s many trips to Emergency for hyperglycemia, they found a mass on her pancreas. After a trip to VGH for 2 endoscopic procedures for a biopsy and a bile duct stent, they confirmed its pancreatic cancer. We’ve never been given a β€œstage” but as of her last CT scan is was borderline resectable. We met with a Surgeon in Vancouver who specializes in the whipple procedure who was optimistic that she could do the surgery. Couple weeks later mom finally sees an oncologist at BC Cancer in Surrey who has given us a 180 and told my mom her health isn’t good enough to survive the more aggressive chemo needed before surgery can be done, and he can offer palliative chemo. Fuck.

Now I’m not saying the Oncologist was wrong. My mom has a fuck tonne of co-morbidities, and I’m still surprised the surgeon didn’t say β€œholy fuck no. we can’t do a god damn whipple procedure on your mom, have you looked at her?”

For those that don’t know, the whipple procedure is pretty much the only surgery they can do to remove a pancreatic cancer tumor. The basically scoop out some stomach, duodenum, the pancreases, and the bile duct then Frankenstein that shit all back together.

The oncologist said without any chemo, mom will likely have about 3 months… (I guess 2 months now because that first appointment was at the beginning of March.) And with palliative chemo Β―\_(ツ)_/Β― . He also said he’d be willing to see how she does on the mild chemo and maybe move her up to the more aggressive chemo if she handles it well.

Mom also had to get that first stent replaced, which has delated her start of chemo to next week.

The doctor also referred to Home Health to get some care at home, and here is where we get to the real actual question.

My mom can’t take care of herself. She currently lives alone, and her health is bad enough that I think she needs to be in care / in patient somewhere.

I take her to appointments when I can, but I still work full time and I have a 2-year-old. If I don’t take her to an appointment, she won’t make it. She’ll tell me β€œoh it’s fine, I can take my chair to the skytrain” But in reality, she doesn’t make it. She’s too weak to get herself going. She’s also

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πŸ‘︎ 89
πŸ“°︎ r/vancouver
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πŸ‘€︎ u/SmallLady
πŸ“…︎ Mar 28 2019
🚨︎ report
6 months sober!

My last drink was April 11, after an initial 10 day streak reset when I finally accepted that buying a six-pack and β€œjust having a couple” really meant β€œdrinking a six pack”. I’d been a fairly regular drinker for 25 years (I am 50) and this is by far the longest streak (and I have no intention to relapse at this point!). On average the final couple years I was pretty much drinking daily, probably between 3 and 6 drinks, depending on what was going on for family activities or social events. Probably a bit more on weekends and holidays.

It has been a crazy six months, though. Starting only two weeks after I quit, I ended up in hospital for kidney stones, then a massive GI bleed due to an undiagnosed ulcer. The ulcer was no doubt partially caused by alcohol, but also by NSAIDS (careful with your ibuprofen consumption, folks) as well as poorly managed acid reflux.

The ulcer led to further investigations, pancreatitis from one of the endoscopic procedures, and after that diagnostic, it turns out I have Stage 4 bile duct cancer. I haven’t found a strong link between alcohol and cholangiocarcinoma but I’m sure that it must have played some role in it.

During my times in hospital it was easy to avoid drinking, but while at home for the first few months this forum has been amazing for support, as I read about everyone’s triumphs and defeats. The level of support everyone has for one another - all of us anonymous strangers but with a common disease - is incredibly inspiring.

I’m taking a positive, optimistic, but pragmatic view on my cancer. I had a full β€œWhipple procedure” to try to excise the tumour completely but it wasn’t totally successful, and I’ll be starting chemo in a few weeks.

Occasionally I think about a few beers as a brief respite for the existential angst that comes with having a serious disease, but this forum certainly serves as a reminder that the respite is very brief, and will be followed by regret and heightened anxiety... so no thanks!

Anyways, thanks to all of you for your support, whether it was direct or indirect. You are all inspiring to me and I wish you all the best on your journey of sobriety.

IWNDWYT!

πŸ‘︎ 8
πŸ“°︎ r/stopdrinking
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πŸ‘€︎ u/meisen99
πŸ“…︎ Oct 12 2019
🚨︎ report
UPDATE: Possible pancreatic cancer

My mother had a Whipple procedure on Thursday. Of course surgery was backed up, so her time was bumped from noon to 3. My grandmother, aunt and I camped out in the hospital most of the day - I had class from 6-9. They told me to just go since she wouldn't even by done by the time I got out of class. I was surprised to get a text at 7:30 that she was done. Surgeon said putting everything back together went very well, the hardest part was getting through all the scar tissue from her gallbladder surgery (done 30+ years ago).

The surgeon believes it is likely stage 2 or 3, and they did need to remove the lymph nodes in that area as they were hard. They still don't know where the mass grew from, still have to wait for pathology. Is there any chance this is not pancreatic cancer but something else in that same area? They do believe she will need chemo when she gets out. The doctor made a point to said chemo doesn't kill the cancer cells so much as makes them 'hide'. Could still give her years but that is another unknown territory that is terrifying.

Post op has been okay. She is defiantly loopy from the pain meds and hallucinating (sometimes she is aware of it, other times it is kinda funny). But she can't remember much, including not to go the bathroom by herself! She has slipped and hurt herself twice trying to get up on her own. Moms are terrible patients!

I've been down every day but I have a soar throat this morning and while I'm hoping it is just from allergies, I'm really nervous if it isn't. She is still going to be in the hospital another week and I'd hate if I can't visit because of a damn cold.

Thank you all for the kind and insightful comments on my last post. This may be the only place on Reddit that I got such kind comments. I even posted some questions on a religion sub and was chewed out for being selfish. Gotta love the internet...

tl;dr: Mom has cancer, not sure what kind yet. Whipple done, next step chemo.

Original post: https://www.reddit.com/r/pancreaticcancer/comments/d5apmk/possible_pancreatic_cancer_diagnosis/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x

πŸ‘︎ 5
πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/sputzie88
πŸ“…︎ Sep 22 2019
🚨︎ report
Not coping right now

My partner was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer September 18, had the whipples procedure in November, started floforinox January and finished chemo three weeks ago. He developed jaundice, CT scan Friday, today told he has a mass obstructing his bile duct. It's fucking back. It feels like the world has stopped turning.

πŸ‘︎ 7
πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Nomorecoffee101
πŸ“…︎ Jul 22 2019
🚨︎ report
Why I Got a Smartphone (Despite Dudders)

I don't think I've told y'all this one before.

When I was in high school, my dad had pancreatic cancer, and he had major surgery to cut out all the guts nearby. It's called a Whipple procedure, and it's one of the more complicated and risky surgeries around.

Apparently, a healthy pancreas is ... spongey, and that makes it hard to stitch up. It can leak digestive juices down into your guts, around the outsides of your lungs, and - importantly - it can dissolve the blood clots that are keeping you from massive hemorrhage.

So at about 9pm on a school night, my brother and I get a call from my uncle, saying that he's on his way over. Dad's in bad shape, though he doesn't have any details.

Dudders and Dad are four hours away, at a major hospital. My little brother and I stayed home.

When I get flashbacks, they're flashbacks to that night. Leaning against the car window in the dark, trying to do homework by the dim light of passing cars' headlights. The cool chill of the air as we walked from the car park to the intensive care unit. The smell of antiseptic and carpet fiber as I curled beneath a waiting-room chair to sleep, with my backpack full of textbooks as a pillow.

None of us had smartphones then; this was ten years ago, and my family weren't early adopters. I'm still the only one in my family with a smartphone. So we were driving four hours on the interstate with bad signal, no map, and my ten-year-old cousin trying to give directions over the phone at eleven PM.

We got lost. We got pretty damn lost, and ended up going almost an hour down the wrong highway, before we turned around.

We didn't know if my father was even alive, then. Dudders won't give us any details over the phone, and I think by this point she'd stopped answering completely. Two hours can make a hell of a difference, when the problem is 'massive hemorrhage.'

Dudders and Dad make fun of me for having a smartphone - they think it's dumb that I want to be able to contact people in case of emergencies, and that I want a maps application. They think it's "exciting" to get lost.

That night? That was not the good fucking kind of exciting. Especially when Dudders wouldn't tell us a damn thing about what was going on until we arrived, and she spent the day demanding comfort from her terrified children rather than parenting them.

Dad's okay now, and Dad and Dudders think it's dumb that I developed PTSD from this whole situation - that I need to 'just get over it.'

I'm keeping my

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πŸ‘︎ 90
πŸ“°︎ r/JUSTNOMIL
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πŸ‘€︎ u/OrdinaryMouse2
πŸ“…︎ Mar 13 2019
🚨︎ report
Thoughts of suicide AFTER cancer?

Hi, I'm a 36/F pancreatic cancer survivor. I had the whipple procedure last September and as far as we can tell there's no more cancer. I thought I was gonna be okay but I found out the hard way how the experience of cancer lives on even when it's supposedly all gone.

Today, I'm struggling. I feel guilty that I am since so many of you want more than anything to be cancer-free. I should just be happy to be alive and well with a good prognosis considering that pancreatic cancer is often a death sentence. I got a letter from my PCP the other day telling me that she was looking at my blood work and thinks I need to come in and see her pretty soon to talk about it. I'm sick to my stomach and I've done nothing but cry all morning while trying to press the call button on my cell phone to make an appt with her. I don't want to be told there's anything else wrong with me. I can't go through it again so soon. I know you all know very well how that feels.

I'm scared to death of my own body. What compounds this problem even more is that my decade-old relationship with my boyfriend has deteriorated to the point where I think I need to leave him. That's really scary for me. I don't have any stable family to fall back on if I mess up. I'd just be homeless. I have no safety net. I haven't even gone back to work yet, and when I do, it can only be part time. I applied for low income housing for myself but they said the wait could be over a year. However, since I'm on disability they might let me cut in line but that doesn't give much of a time frame.

It's so weird how when I was told I had pancreatic cancer I was afraid to die, but now I'm so used to the idea of death being just around the corner I'm far less afraid of injecting an entire vial of insulin. The idea of falling asleep and never having to wake up to this nightmare inside my mind again is disturbingly appealing. I'm in therapy and I'm taking Zoloft and it all helps but nothing can patch my broken heart and feelings of betrayal but time. I just don't know if I want to go through it. Maybe there's something good on the other side but I find it hard to trust. I've lost the ability to hold on to hope today. I'm way beyond overwhelmed and I feel like nothing will ever change and I'll always feel like an unlovable burden. It's not true, but depression has a way to convincing us otherwise. I guess I'm looking for thoughts from others who've found themselves in a similar situation.

Edit: I went to see my doctor an

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πŸ‘︎ 26
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/tacosarelove
πŸ“…︎ Mar 25 2019
🚨︎ report
2 years post whipple and struggling

I underwent the Whipple procedure to remove a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm in October 2017 at age 40. The surgery lasted 10.5 hours and I was hospitalized for 28 days because I couldn't eat anything. I was vomiting constantly. I relied on IV nutrition through a PICC line for 6 weeks. I feel as though I'm constantly in the bathroom. I've tried Creon but doesn't seem to help much. I recently discovered that I am extremely anemic and b12 deficient which isn't making me exhausted and depressed. My primary physician doesn't really seem to care and I'm feeling very alone. I wish I how to support group of Whipple survivors. But I know there are so few of us. If anyone has inside or advice I would really appreciate it.

πŸ‘︎ 3
πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Mhcgrl
πŸ“…︎ Aug 24 2019
🚨︎ report
20-month-old with obstructive cholestasis and large pancreatic head mass (Diagnosed as IMT)

Hi all,

Looking to see if there are some brilliant minds out there who may have additional suggestions on a differential diagnosis or possible other treatments for my daughter. A little background: presented with jaundice at 20 months old and found to have a mass on the head of her pancreas obstructing the biliary and pancreatic ducts. Initial diagnosis was an IMT which is extremely rare especially in this area. Initial treatment was with steroids which did decrease the size a bit. After second opinion and pathology, tumor was found to be ALK positive and she was placed on Xalkori (crizotinib) and weaned off steroids. Became septic due to adrenal insufficiency during weaning process and was hospitalized at around 2 years old. Given hydrocortisone along with antibiotics during hospitalization. Tumor continued shrinking until about 2.5 years of age. Continued on Xalkori only for additional 6 months. No change in tumor size. Stopped Xalkori 6 months ago and now at 3.5 years of age most recent MRCP showed increase in tumor size. I’ve included initial pathology notes below (initially showed ALK negative). In reviewing her information and case studies online I’m curious if it truly could have been the steroids having an effect as opposed to the Xalkori or even a combination of both. I’m not sure if the presence of IGG4 cells and plasma may be part of that or if perhaps that is truly the cause. While the tumor was shrinking, she was always on some small dose of steroids it seems. Would intravenous steroids affect shrinkage more than oral? I assume so but obviously I’m not a doctor, just a mom who is looking for any out of the box solutions to try prior to considering surgery which would be a Whipple procedure and as I understand it, there are very few surgeons who have performed a Whipple on a 3.5 year old so not keen on taking that plunge until 100% out of options. Thanks in advance for any suggestions and if more information is needed I’m happy to provide what I can. God bless!

A. Pancreas: Biopsy: Fibroblastic spindle cell neoplasm favor inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (see comment)

Morphologically, this is a cytologically banal vaguely fascicular spindle cell proliferation entrapping pancreatic lobules and admixed with numerous inflammatory cells including plasma cells and lymphoid aggregates. The spindle cells have characteristics of fibroblasts/myofibroblasts with oval nuclei, fine chromatin, small nucleolus and amphophilic cytoplasm. Convincin

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πŸ‘︎ 4
πŸ“°︎ r/pathology
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πŸ‘€︎ u/eao052789
πŸ“…︎ Sep 23 2019
🚨︎ report
Dad's First Chemo Day is Tomorrow

First round of chemo is scheduled for tomorrow and now we're not sure if he'll be going through with it. His oncologist is worried that he isn't strong enough to endure it and now suspecting that he's had a mini stroke. My dad previously had issues with self medicating and suffers from PTSD along with depression. I feel like our journey is just about to start and he doesn't want to. Just like when he had started his road to recovery from the accident that resulted in PTSD, he said he wanted to get better, but did the opposite.

I don't want to push him around, but I'm feeling a swift kick in the ass will help?? Is that a terrible approach? I've seen him being offered food, my mom pleading with him to drink a little bit of water, gatorade, something to hydrate him and he just doesn't want it. He's been given some anti nausea medication but it's not helping. I don't want him to give up already. But that's easier for me to say because I have no clue how he's feeling.

He had the whipple procedure a month and a half ago and that recovery has been the most difficult for him. It's almost as if that surgery gave him a glimpse of what to expect and he's like "nope!"

I know this is more than a rant, but I just needed to get this out there with people who have experienced this or are in the same boat.

πŸ‘︎ 8
πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/bubblebomel
πŸ“…︎ Jul 30 2019
🚨︎ report
Pancreatic cancer: what is you experience with first round chemo?

Hi there. My brother has recently been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. He is a 48 yr old brand new first time dad and has previously undergone a whipples procedure. Unfortunately they.. weren't able to get out the cancer so he will start chemo on the 16th. Any ideas what to expect and how I can support him. He's my only blood relative and I'm terrified. I can't bear the thought of him not taking his daughter to her first day of school, or parties...christmas when she really " gets" it and the excitement that follows...u get my drift. Much appreciated. I'm an ex nurse so I'll understand any technical terms ( I hope!)

πŸ‘︎ 4
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/ringoftruth
πŸ“…︎ Jul 11 2019
🚨︎ report
s/p whipple in LTC rehab

I have a resident in my LTC facility that is s/p pancreaticoduodenectomy with a j tube on Vital 1.5, but also full liquid diet. The resident is here for rehabilitation, not long term care. I've had a few semi-complex patients/residents, but this is beyond anything I've ever dealt with (yet).

So I'm a huge nerd and knowing that I super enjoy learning things, can you all help me out with an appropriate full liquid diet for this patient? My diet manual says sodas are fine, but it came up in morning report today that the family was told no sodas at the hospital. Most of what I'm pulling up on Google says full liquid is short term, then progress the diet but I guess with the j-tube that doesnt stand true?

There are no SLP-related issues, so the tube is r/t the whipple procedure? What is my role is all of this? Is the ultimate goal to d/c the j-tube and progress the diet? My RD put in her 3 week notice and has checked out (see post history if you desire, basically she hated it here and has been making me do all the work). I don't know where we are going as far as getting an RD for the facility, I'm very autonomous for a DTR but I know we need an RD per regulations. Anyway, I dont come across clinically complex in LTC and I'd like to learn!

πŸ‘︎ 6
πŸ“°︎ r/dietetics
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πŸ‘€︎ u/jemappellepatty
πŸ“…︎ Jun 07 2019
🚨︎ report
I'm going to participate in my first surgery, AMA! (AKA, I'm going to be holding retraction for 10 hours, AMA!)

I'm a student in a medical field, and I'm on a clinical observation rotation for surgery.

(I'm an MP student. Once I get licensed it'll be similar to a nurse practitioner but a bit different)

Students don't get to do much in surgical procedures besides hold retractors. Retractors are these things, they're essentially giant hooks that hold back tissue to prevent it from getting in the way of the surgeons view. It also takes a lot of force to hold, it's going to be a long time, and it's a generally not fun job to do.

It'll be an (estimatedly) 10 hour long procedure. It will be a whipple procedure which removes part of the pancreas, small intestine, gallbladder, and bile duct to manage chronic pancreatitis. We'll also be doing a prophylactic appendectomy (meaning removing the appendix before it's a problem later).

It's 3:45AM. The procedure starts at 9am and will continue until, roughly 6pm.

For funsies, during these 10 hours, statistically, in my country...

β€’ There will be around 3000 earthquake tremors we can't feel that may or may not be measurable, we will feel 1-2 measurable earthquakes

β€’ 1 person will die in a traffic collision, and 3 traffic collisions will happen.

β€’ 100 children will be born, 40 people will die

β€’ 2000 calls will be made to the emergency phone number

Ask me anything!

πŸ‘︎ 2
πŸ“°︎ r/casualiama
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πŸ‘€︎ u/SlimyStudent
πŸ“…︎ Sep 26 2019
🚨︎ report
How to help chemo not suck

My father was diagnosed with stage 1 pancreatic cancer and will be starting chemo. He has really been struggling with recovery from the whipple procedure he had to remove the cancer and I'm worried that he won't want to finish chemo because of how sick he already feels and we haven't even started. I plan on staying with him during his first round and am looking for things that I can do during that time to help take his mind off of what's going on.

Anyone have any recommendations on what we could do during the five hours? Or things that we should make sure we take for him during that time? I'm not so sure he'd just want to binge watch some shows on a streaming platform..

TIA!

πŸ‘︎ 5
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/bubblebomel
πŸ“…︎ Jul 11 2019
🚨︎ report
I need emotional support right now. My baby brother is in trouble

Little bit of background: several years ago he had non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma which resulted in a serious pericardium swelling. They wanted to perform a procedure that would relieve the pressure on his heart, buying him enough time to take chemotherapy and radiation. However the surgery was very intensive on blood loss, and the assholes in the hospital liaison committee performed a 24 seven vigil by his bedside. He never took a blood transfusion, and that forced the doctors to take a more radical approach to dealing with his cancer. They hit him with very very high doses of radiation. He survived, despite being given a 5% chance. That was seven years ago. Now he has been told he needs an extreme surgery called a Whipple procedure in order to alleviate scar tissue. The scar tissue is a direct result of the radiation. There is a reasonable chance that the reason he needs this procedure is because he refused the blood transfusion. As his older brother, I indoctrinated him. I didn’t fight for him to choose not to take blood. It’s set him on a life course that brought him to a place where he needs an extreme procedure, The procedure which cuts out your gallbladder, half of your pancreas and a part of your stomach. It leaves you insulin dependent and possibly diabetic for the rest of your life, and it has a 40% mortality rate within five years. He’s only 34. This is an absolute tragedy. I don’t want your empathy. I’ve had enough people tell me that I’m not guilty, but he was my baby brother and I indoctrinated him into this bullshit. If I didn’t do it, it’s prognosis might be a lot stronger. If you chose to take blood all those years ago, there’s a good chance that he would not have found himself fighting massive radiation induced scar tissue and do losing half a stomach a third of his pancreas , his bile duct, duodenum and o his gallbladder, ability to eat a normal diet, live a normal life, and he finally free of the cult. I deserve your scoring. I’m 15 years older than he is. I studied the Bible with him. I indoctrinated him. I am unworthy of him.

πŸ‘︎ 49
πŸ“°︎ r/exjw
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πŸ‘€︎ u/TheHistoryCritic
πŸ“…︎ Apr 12 2019
🚨︎ report
Suggestions for in-home health care for my mom who is still working full time whilst fighting pancreatic cancer.

My mom is currently fighting pancreatic cancer, she’s about to have her 5th round of chemo and is preparing to have the Whipple procedure hopefully this fall. My mom continues to works full time because it helps her mentally and our family financially, she’s currently using up all her vacation days in order to do short term disability when she undergoes the Whipple. She is able to care for herself in every way besides cooking forcing herself to eat and drink. My mom only eats when us kids make her something and force her to eat it but my sisters and I are all going to college about 2 hours away this upcoming fall making it quite impossible to commute daily. I’m scared to leave her this fall, my dad will be with her but he works long hours and isn’t able to give my mom the care she needs. I want to take the semester off to care for her but it being my senior year my mom is not allowing me to drop out. I was wondering what my options are about in home health care, my family wouldn’t be able to afford someone coming in everyday unless insurance is able to cover it. I also do not know if she would be able to qualify for this because she still works full time. Any suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated

πŸ‘︎ 7
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/imissuuuuu
πŸ“…︎ Jul 29 2019
🚨︎ report
Treatment Plans

My mom was recently diagnosed w/pancreatic cancer. Seems like I'm really the primary caretaker and am most definitely the one advocating for her.

She's currently in the hospital recovering from her Whipple Procedure that was done on June 25. Her 'lead physician' said next up is 6 rounds of chemo.

I do apologize for not providing many details - I simply don't have them at the moment.

I am learning as we go, so please excuse my ignorance. ...

Looking to hear about treatment plans anyone else has either completed or is currently working. ... actually, anything anyone would like to share would be helpful.

Side note, my mom does not want to travel away from her local support system. I reached out to MD Anderson and was informed that they do physician-to-physician consults all the time. I mentioned this to her 'lead physician' and was assured that he is open/willing to the idea.

Thank you everyone for your time!

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πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/catty_blur
πŸ“…︎ Jun 30 2019
🚨︎ report
Gemcitabine/Capecitabine vs FOLFIRINOX

Hey all,

My mother (59, fit and athletic) has had a similar story to most that have been posted here. I'll post the timeline below, and leave my questions at the end for anyone who can speak to their experience or has medical knowledge that can be of help.

  1. [Late November] Around last Thanksgiving, she was experiencing some abdominal pain and jaundice.

  2. [Early December] We took her to the ER and had a gastroenterologist take a look. An ERCP was done, and we were told that there were no stones causing the blockage. A stent was placed in order to prevent future blockage, but we were still unsure of the cause at that time.

  3. Her jaundice cleared up, and December passed seemingly healthily and uneventfully.

  4. [Early January] Unfortunately, the jaundice came back around New Years. We were referred to another gastroenterologist at a different hospital. Another ERCP was done, and the existing stent was replaced with a larger stent. This time, the doctor informed us that there was a malignant mass found in her bile duct. We were told at this time that she had bile duct cancer. Of course, this came as a shock - we were devastated due to seeing her previous healthy self so recently and the lack of family history of cancer.

  5. [Mid January] We immediately made an appoint with a surgeon to discuss a potential Whipple procedure. He was great - he answered all of our questions regarding the procedure, and he had performed over 30 of them in the past year. We knew we were in good hands. The procedure was scheduled for the end of the week.

  6. She went in for a Whipple procedure to address the removal of her bile duct cancer. Unfortunately, this is when we found out the bad news - the previous scans had completely missed the mass on her pancreas, which was the cause of the bile duct constriction.

  7. A 2cm mass was found at the head of her pancreas, which was successfully removed with clear margins during the Whipple procedure. The rest of her pancreas was clear - the majority of it (80%+) was left in tact. There were no signs of malignancy in the rest of her pancreas, bile duct, gallbladder, and liver. Unfortunately, a few (but not all) lymph nodes were positive for metastatic adenocarcinoma. She was given a diagnosis of Stage II-B PC.

  8. [Late January] She spent the next two weeks recovering in the hospital and at home. Fortunately, there were no setbacks; everything seems to be healing correctly. She is now at home and recovering, albeit slowly. Her

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 4
πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/dreamz__
πŸ“…︎ Feb 06 2019
🚨︎ report
Looking good... but have you thought about hospice?

I have posted in here a few times in regards to my step father having pancreatic cancer. But here is a short backstory.

He was diagnosed in november of 2018. He had a stent put in because the mass was really large. Once they got his pancreas to calm down from an infection they did the whipple procedure. Once he healed from that they started him on chemo. He only has 1 more treatment left out of the 12 ordered for him to do. His most recent one was this past Tuesday (7/16). He saw his doctor beforehand to make sure he was in good enough health because he recent had c. Diff. The doctor told my mom and him that he was really impressed with the results of the most recent scan (about 3 weeks ago), but then almost in the same breath asked if anyone had talked to them about putting him on hospice....

Is pancreatic cancer that invasive that even with the tiniest bit left in the system it can take over so quickly they need hospice as soon as he is done with chemo? He does have another scan, but it's not until a month after his last treatment. Can anyone assist on what we might be looking at longevity wise when his chemo is over?

Thank you.

πŸ‘︎ 8
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/TheMrsB2017
πŸ“…︎ Jul 19 2019
🚨︎ report
I lost my husband to Pancreatic Cancer 10 days ago. I’m still in shock and completely heartbroken.

The story of my husband starts back in 2016. He was diagnosed with Pancreatic Cancer after his bile ducts were blocked due to the mass growing around them. It was Memorial Day weekend and I noticed he was jaundiced. We were surprised but he had been sick that week and we chalked it up to food poisoning from a diner we had visited. Skip to about a week and a half later when we got the results from the ER, they said it was hepatitis, which didn’t sound right to either of us. So back to his primary doctor we went and she referred us to a GI specialist. He ran his tests and determined it was pancreatic cancer. Our whole world flipped upside down.

He was sent to get a stent placed, which resulted in complications and infection. The plan was to drain the bile, then schedule major surgery, The Whipple Procedure. I don’t know why they call it a procedure when it MAJOR surgery. They remove and rearrange some organs and intestines. Anyway, after a round of antibiotics, he gets the surgery done and it’s all downhill from there. Complications, infections, C Diff, and pain that doesn’t subside.

Previous to all this, my husband was hurt in a very bad car vs motorcycle accident. He had severe head trauma and lost his leg. He had grown up hard of hearing but all the head trauma and scarring left him completely deaf. So he learned to get around on crutches and read lips. Back to the Whipple procedure...he needed to then go into a rehab facility to get stronger as he had to use his core to get around the crutches and that was extremely painful.

A few months passed, and he was ready to start chemo. In the meantime, he had gone back to work. He owned his own shop at the time and was needed. He didn’t waste any time in getting back. He did his chemo and 6 months later was cleared. He rang the bell and was free to go. What a joyous time. We wanted to celebrate and scream it from the rooftops.

A month later, we moved down to Georgia, his home state. We wanted to be closer to family and because I just fell in love with GA. β€” Like clockwork, every month that passed we ended up in the hospital. Chief complaint: Pain. This went on from June 2017 until February 2018. The discharge papers stated he was seeking pain medication. Not once did someone take into consideration that he had battled cancer before. Ultrasounds were performed and no one saw anything on them, until we scheduled an appointment with a surgical oncologist who found the tumor. We were devastated.

Several ro

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πŸ‘︎ 9
πŸ“°︎ r/GriefSupport
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πŸ‘€︎ u/HotlantaSummers
πŸ“…︎ Mar 03 2019
🚨︎ report
Just finished the audio books, and incredibly grateful for the therapeutic distraction.

My mom was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer late last October. Its been a pretty rough year. If you have ever had someone in your life with a serious illness, you know that awful feeling. You get to that point were stress and anxiety can take over. Sometime in March I knew I needed a mental distraction and figured the WOT audio books would work. My mom gave me the Eye of the world back in 1996. Continued to read the books when i was younger and loved the story. I just finished the whole audio series today. My mom is now recovering from chemo and a Whipple procedure. Hoping things continue stay positive. Those audio books were the help I needed. Can't sleep, long hospital nights, or just plan don't want to think about it moments. I get the the wheel weaves as the wheel wills but seriously fuck cancer and thank god for a good story to help you forget about real life for awhile. Or for at least around 419 hours.

πŸ‘︎ 89
πŸ“°︎ r/WoT
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πŸ‘€︎ u/fade1979
πŸ“…︎ Sep 28 2018
🚨︎ report
Pancreatic Cancer diagnosis

Hi, all.

My father was "diagnosed" with Stage IV pancreatic cancer.

I use the quotes because I'm really not knowledgeable in the diagnosis of this so I had a question.

Can you really be diagnosed with this just through some imaging and symptoms; or is a biopsy necessary to confirm the diagnosis?

He's been having abdominal pains(he says it was more discomfort than pain) the past couple of weeks up until this past Friday where I guess it became too much for him. My step mother brought him to the ER and I think that's where they first brought up what it may be. The following day, she spoke to the oncologist working on my dad's case and that's when stage iv was announced. They tried to perform a stent yesterday but couldn't. I forget the reason why. Performing an MRI today and a Whipple procedure some time this week.

Should we be seeking second opinions, alternate surgeons or alternate treatment?

Do many questions but dunno where you start. My sister is at the hospital this morning to try to get more info.

I've been reading pancan.org to try to get more info as well but any input from the community here would be helpful.

Cheers!

πŸ‘︎ 19
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/deltablackson
πŸ“…︎ Aug 06 2018
🚨︎ report
Why are some surgeries considered more difficult then others?

For example, why is a Whipple procedure considered a difficult procedure vs an appendectomy? What determines the degree of difficulty? Is it due to the technical skill alone? What are surgical procedures that are considered "difficult" and why?

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πŸ“…︎ Aug 06 2016
🚨︎ report
Pancreatic cancer advice/help

Diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer which Metastasized to the liver. I have tried all treatments and all have been successful to a degree. Had a Whipple procedure with the gull bladder removed which got rid of the tumor on the pancreas. Had the other tumors on the liver except for one burned out. The last remaining one had radiation surgery (high level radiation injected directly into the tumor) but came back and it is more aggressive than before. Doing Irinotecan and 5-fu times 3 which causes horrendous side effects but its livable. They say if they do a liver burnout it guarantees 100% liver infection. My ca19 is currently 1800 which has tripled in the last 2 months while i was off treatment (currently on treatment again). What should be the next logical step? Is a liver transplant possible (would be from a living donor)

Any form of advice is greatly appreciated.

General info about myself:

Age: 47

Sex: Male

Height: 5'11

Weight: 240

Race: White

Location: USA (Pennsylvania)

Current medical issues: None prior to cancer - Whipple caused diabetes. Side effects normal with standard treatments.

Current medications:

RA p-col Rite Tab (take 2 once daily)

Cyclobenzaprine 10mg tab (As needed for mustle spasms)

Dexamethasone (1 pill daily)

Oxycodone

Novolog (floating scale mL vial/inject with meals)

Toujeo Solostar (10mLs daily)

Previous Medications:

Doxycycline Hyclate 100mg tab once daily

Prednisone 10mg tab once daily

Creon Capsules 2 w/ each meal for digestion

Magnesium 400mg 2x daily

Calsium 600mg D3 200 tab once daily

Chlorhexidine 4% scrub

Metronidazole 75% cicam

Ketoconazole @% shampoo

Potassium 1 daily

πŸ‘︎ 6
πŸ“°︎ r/AskDocs
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Cseaisme
πŸ“…︎ Dec 06 2018
🚨︎ report
Please Help Support My Friend Who Was Diagnosed With Pancreatic Cancer

My good friends Ryan (34) & Ashlee (28) were just married last year… however in the past month they discovered a tumor on his Pancreas that proved to be cancerous Adenocarcinoma.Β  There is a long and complicated backstory here, involving misdiagnosis, insurance issues, and other procedures, but I’ll skip ahead for now… (links with more details to follow later). This type of Pancreatic cancer is fast growing (he's lost 25 pounds over the last three weeks), and he needs to battle this as pro-actively as possible.Β  A stint was placed in his Common Bile Duct to assist with the blockage caused by the tumor, and with a strong network of family/friends, he was finally able to change insurance and get into UCLA's cancer program.

UCLA's top Pancreatic surgeon miraculously had a cancellation in his schedule, and they had him scheduled for what they call a β€œWhipple Procedure” on Monday, Dec 10th, an extensive 6+ hour surgery, but necessary first step in his treatment.Β  That’s where things took a turn, because when they opened him up they found a lesion on his liver as well as several polyps on his diaphragm… essentially Stage 4.

I am writing today because his fight is just beginning, and he needs all the help he can get.Β Β He’s too young for cancer, and the doctors are all shocked when they meet him, but he has a good mindset and a wonderful wife, so there is hope.Β Β He has a good support group around him, and the right doctors, but they need help financially.Β Β The road he is now on is a long one, with many unknowns and barriers along the way.Β Β We want to remove as many of these roadblocks as we can to give him the best chance of survival.

So if you can, please consider donating to their GoFundMe <https://www.gofundme.com/support-ryan039s-fight-against-cancer> page and follow along with his story through this Facebook Group <https://www.facebook.com/groups/2222785931312108/>, where he posts regular updates.Β Β It’s important to him to encourage others along the way.Β Β If you can’t give, please keep him in your thoughts and prayers – every bit of support is appreciated!!”

πŸ‘︎ 58
πŸ“°︎ r/Assistance
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πŸ‘€︎ u/thelastormsbee
πŸ“…︎ Dec 15 2018
🚨︎ report
[Offtopic][Update] So it is cancer... great.

Previous Post

So... my tumor is cancerous - its 9 cm (head/toe) x 7cm (left/right) x 6cm (front/back) approximately with a ~3.7 secondary tumor in the nearest lymph node.

I got very very lucky in that it pinched my bile duct and we found it - because its a low grade islet cell (pancreatic) neuroendocrine tumor. Just got the good news today that it has not metastasized. Low grade tumors don't really respond to chemo much so once they metastasize you're on the slow boat to fuckedville.

December 1st I have surgery (Whipple Procedure) to get rid of it.

Fuck Cancer. If you have a family history of it talk to your doctor about screenings.

πŸ‘︎ 130
πŸ“°︎ r/Eve
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Kazan
πŸ“…︎ Nov 03 2015
🚨︎ report
OR Nurse Here - Birthday Present for Surgeon?

Greetings Gang,

I am an OR nurse in a large academic hospital in the northeast and have an interesting situation coming up later this week. As a bit of a background, I am part of a 4 nurse team specializing in Whipple procedures with a specific surgeon. As such, we work quite a bit with this surgeon and know each other at a friendship level to the least, family level at best.


The surgeon we work with is having a birthday coming up soon and the four of us are going out to dinner (not sure if we are taking the surgeon "out" or not). Either way, I really respect this surgeon for a number of reasons and owe them quite a bit of thanks for their personal patience and multiple times of educating me about Whipple procedures.


With all of this said, I would like to give them something beyond dinner as a token of thanks and have a few questions.

  • A. Is this ok?
  • B. What are some ideas for gifts?

I don't believe that money is any issue for this surgeon, so I think trying to buy a "nice" gift that I might otherwise buy for a normal person would be a waste. Would a personal, handwritten note of thanks be received well?

Thanks in advance for any and all advice.

πŸ‘︎ 34
πŸ“°︎ r/medicine
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Voltairious
πŸ“…︎ Jul 22 2017
🚨︎ report
Stage 4 liver cancer

My dad recently went to the hospital due to some internal bleeding caused by a tumor in the liver. he ended up having a whipples procedure done but during the surgery they found some more cancer in the lungs and pancreas. My mom whom spoke with the doctor said it was stage4 that spread to the lungs and pancreas and theres cancer cells in the blood. He's going to go through chemo after he's recovered from the surgery but I'm really anxious and I honestly can't imagine life without him. What should I expect, what are the chances he'll be fine after the chemo?

πŸ‘︎ 15
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Nahtangnouv
πŸ“…︎ Apr 11 2018
🚨︎ report
Ideas for earning income during cancer treatment in USA

Hi! I'm a 36 y/o female with pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. I'm operable, and I'm expected to recover and live a good, long life after I have the Whipple Procedure in a couple of weeks. The cancer hasn't spread so far that we can tell, so the outlook is positive. However, it's pancreatic cancer so we know that's nothing to scoff at. I just so happened to catch it early enough to treat. That doesn't mean it won't come back.

Since it's a cancer that is not eligible for disability in the United States, I'm grasping at straws trying to figure out how to afford being alive. I have a multitude of other health conditions that compound my ability to maintain full time employment. I end up missing too many days of work from physical illness and I usually quit just before being fired to sort of save my resume. In hindsight, that may have been a mistake.

Once I've recovered, I like to do something to draw passive income so that I can hopefully make enough money to get by on while also not having to expect myself to maintain a traditional full time job since my country doesn't think my cancer is bad enough. I have a bachelors degree which makes a difference in disability determination. Apparently since I've been to college they seem to think I have more options for employment in rural Kentucky... I guess I should move? On what money?

How on earth do I get out of this conundrum? I hardly have the energy to get up and clean my house much less hold a job. I have no idea what to do. I don't have any family that can help me. I'm on my own. Can someone please help me find resources that can get me on my feet again once I'm done with the surgery? It's rare for someone to fully recover from pancreatic cancer, but I'm expected to, yet I'm afraid for my future since I'm not sick enough for the government but too sick for employers. I'm frustrated and I'm starting to feel really hopeless.

πŸ‘︎ 6
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/tacosarelove
πŸ“…︎ Sep 01 2018
🚨︎ report
My Sister Has A Pancreatic Cyst - What To Do Now?
  • 32
  • Female
  • USA

My sister has had an Intrapapillary Mucinous Neoplasm (IPMN) of the Pancreas (type of Pancreatic Cyst) for the last 3-4 years.

Her doctors have been monitoring it every six months and after her most recent check up it doubled in size and they’re suggesting surgery to remove it. They are recommending the Whipple procedure and she is meeting with her doctor and surgeon next week to discuss.

Here is a report of her latest CT Scan.

My grandmother passed away from Pancreatic Cancer a few years ago (she also had the Whipple procedure by a top surgeon in Boston) so my family is clearly concerned about my sister.

As I mentioned, she’s meeting with her doctor and surgeon next week and I wanted to ask if anyone has advice on next steps or questions to ask the doctors. Any advice or feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

πŸ‘︎ 2
πŸ“°︎ r/AskDocs
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πŸ‘€︎ u/ghsNICK
πŸ“…︎ Aug 03 2018
🚨︎ report
28 Hours I've been awake now. [family]

My Father has been battling cancer for the better part of a decade.

First it hit him in the throat (Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma).

Then he got a growth in his lymphnodes in his hips.

Finally it showed in his pancrease.

Each diagnosis saw the usual chemotherapy, appointments, after-care, during-care, pretty much now it's resulted in him been admitted into the hospital. It's not looking good.

I have to admit that I'm shit scared. I'm not ready to lose my Dad and every minute that I have to see him in the state that he is breaks my heart. It's honestly does.

The man lived his life so well though. He was an honest man. He never let there be an injustice. He conducted his business well and was well regarded in his community. A unrecognized social pillar.

Well, now here we are and I am listening to my Father sputtering and struggling to keep a straw in his mouth. Hollywood has a pretty fucked up way of not illustrating terminal illnesses and demise and I think I know why - because no one wants to see that. It's not pretty. There's nothing romantic about this disease.

I think I'm writing this at this moment to just alleviate how I feel about my Father's impending passing.

I was told to make decisions for my Father's care.

The hospital began asking me to think about DNR's and other such matters. I don't want to be POA but it sure as hell beats any other number of possible scenarios and prospective POAs to just go ham with procedures and all that nonsense.

It's not that I have a problem ensuring my Father's rights to a peaceful and pain management passing. He's had 7 chemo rounds. I'm surprised the man is not glowing like Mr. Burn's in that episode the Simpsons.

That's besides the pancreatic cancer where they performed the whipple procedure. That was just around 2 years ago and his whole quality of life just went snowballing.

What joy is there for someone when they cannot digest food properly or when the chemo strips your energy and sense of taste. My dad has all of that right now including severe abdominal pain because what little left of his pancreas ended up with the cancer reoccurring and there's nothing left to cut out.

They tried chemotherapy which is the ugliest thing that we do to someone to maybe make them well. My Father was too 'old' this time around and the doctors tried to warn him without insisting on it but they explained that there was a much higher likelihood that he wou

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πŸ‘︎ 17
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Velvetroses
πŸ“…︎ Aug 02 2017
🚨︎ report
Single on Valentine's Day. Thought I'd cheer myself up with some progress pics.

SV: Broke into the 170s this morning and I am super proud! Lowest weight I have been at since before having kids, which means ten years! The highest weight I saw was 215 and that was NOT during a pregnancy. I started walking and hiking a lot with mynew dog this past summer and got down to 195 but then I stayed there for a long time. In January my mom had surgery, serious surgery (Whipple procedure in case anyone wants to google) and I thought this could be me some day (my mom has familial polyposis and passed the condition down to me) and it just suddenly clicked that I need to take better care of myself. So I started on January 12 (it was a Tuesday which by itself was a big step for me, I always start these types of things on MONDAYS) and haven't regretted it for a second. The things I did weren't even big drastic changes, mostly cutting out pop and junk (I still indulge in a chocolate bar every now and then) and upped my water intake. I got a vivofit and make sure to get to at least 10k steps every day. Some days I get to 20k! I started couch to 5k. Finished week 5 last week and ran for 25 minutes straight. What a rush that was. I also started doing some body weight exercises like planking and squats. As for changes in my diet I have upped the amount of protein I get and changed the kind of carbs I eat and the biggest thing for me has been portion control. Things are going well right now but now I'm feeling like I want to kick it up a notch so I have decided to try the 21 day fix program and see if I like that. The food plan looks very similar to what I am doing already so the biggest challenge will be the workouts. I am extremely uncoordinated so I'm a bit intimidated about the idea of keeping up with a video but I am going to try my best. Hoping my kit arrives sometime this week so I can start. It was my reward for meeting the goal I had set when I first started. The last thing I want to say that I've changed and this was probably mybugget hurdle and something I will always have to deal with, negative self talk. I am my own biggest critic, like I'm sure most of us are. I constantly put myself down, compare myself to others and am just generally a bully to myself. Since the new year came in I have made a consistent effort to stop myself mid thought whenever I start on that track and turn things around. I feel like this is why I have had the success I have had so far. For example when I'm running I tend to think "I can't do this. I have to stop." no

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 94
πŸ“°︎ r/loseit
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Samaxash
πŸ“…︎ Feb 14 2016
🚨︎ report
Inner thigh injection site?

My dad injects insulin in his inner thigh and was directed by a diabetes nurse recently not to. He prefers it there and to use the outside of his legs. He injects once at night. Full disclosure, he is not necessarily diabetic, he survived pancreatic cancer and had what is called a whipple procedure. As a result, he has decreased insulin production.

Thank you in advance for anyone's input. I tried to search the posts but wasn't able to find any specific mention of inner thigh injection sites.

πŸ‘︎ 7
πŸ“°︎ r/diabetes
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πŸ‘€︎ u/JimboThrasher
πŸ“…︎ Apr 30 2017
🚨︎ report
I'm fighting pancreatic cancer and I could use your support.

I'm having a major surgery called the Whipple Procedure on 9/19. I can't work right now and I'm not eligible for disabilty because thankfully my cancer could be cured by the surgery which is very rare news. However, I still need to pay for basic living expenses. I'll also have gobs of medical bills after I get out of the hospital. I'm gonna be down and out for about 8 weeks. If you could help me it would mean the world to me. If you'd like to follow my progress and be involved in my recovery just hit me up on my GoFundMe page or in the comments below and I'll add you to my Facebook. All types of support are appreciated!

https://www.gofundme.com/christys-road-to-recovery

πŸ‘︎ 6
πŸ“°︎ r/Charity
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πŸ‘€︎ u/tacosarelove
πŸ“…︎ Sep 17 2018
🚨︎ report
Dad's surgery in the morning, scared but trying to be hopeful

Currently 24, my dad is 55. I've never ever dealt with cancer to be honest and never thought someone so close to me would be struck by it.

My dad is having a whipple surgery tomorrow where they will remove part of his pancreas and the tumor in his duodenum.

"Overall, the five-year survival rate after a Whipple procedure is about 20 to 25%. Even if the procedure successfully removes the visible tumor, it's possible that some cancer cells have already spread elsewhere in the body, where they can form new tumors and eventually cause death" -webmd

I'm currently crying my eyes out. My dad has always been there for me, always been so strong. This hit us out of no where.

I have great faith in the surgeon but I'm just so scared.

πŸ‘︎ 8
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/championiris
πŸ“…︎ Sep 13 2017
🚨︎ report
Mom needs help- post-successful Whipple surgery recovery -gastrointestinal issues

So my 70 year old mom had the Whipple procedure done last year and then a second surgery to patch a hole caused by an ulcer.
Her gut is giving her a lot of grief and G.I. Specialists wont do anything besides give her enzymes to eat when she eats.
She also has cancer spits around her aorta and they won't touch it on an operating table.

No symptoms from the spots on her aorta and she could have weeks to years ahead of her so priority one is getting her gut as good as possible.

She is currently on day 8 of taking two doses of raw cannabis oil and is seeing a increase in appetite and less vomiting. She's put on about 3 pounds. It's anecdotal, but wanted you to know what's going on.

My question is what can she do to lessen the gassy pain in her upper intestine?

Thank you in advance.

Her son in California.

πŸ‘︎ 12
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ“…︎ Jul 16 2018
🚨︎ report
Any Advice for 30yo Guy with New Cancer Diagnosis (Cholangiocarcinoma)?

Hi There.

&nbsp;

A LITTLE ABOUT MY CANCER:

I was diagnosed with Cholangiocarcinoma (a rare and aggressive Liver Cancer) about 5 weeks ago.

My cancer was considered "R0 Resectable" (potentially curative surgery), and I underwent a major surgery ("Whipple Procedure") about 3 weeks ago. This removed the primary ~3Cm tumor in my Mid Bile Duct, as well as smaller growths in two adjacent lymph nodes near my Pancreas. In all, the surgery removed my Gallbladder, part of my Stomach, the head of my Pancreas, the first section of my Small Intestines, and 20 Lymph Nodes. Good results from surgery, and very speedy recovery – I'm basically 90% myself already. Clean margins, and good Pathology Report. I've also gotten loads of scans to check to potential distant metastasis, which have all been clean.

However, it seems this is a very aggressive Cancer with high rates of recurrence. So I'm headed into a TBD Chemo Treatment... I have appointments with Medical Oncologists at two different large, top-rated cancer centers in about a week. I'm hoping to get something that feels like a tangible prognosis/outlook (which my Surgical Oncology wouldn't really offer me beyond the scope of surgical outcomes), and grip on what the duration/severity of Chemo is likely to be. I have very little idea what to expect, apart from what I've read online at night... which isn't exactly overwhelmingly positive stuff.

&nbsp;&nbsp;

A LITTLE ABOUT ME:

I'm a 30 year old guy living an extremely career-driven life in a major metropolitan city. I'm very thankful to have good health care benefits, and strong financial security. Good support from family/friends as well. Sort of a "things really seemed to be going well... until..." situation.

&nbsp;&nbsp;

WHY I'M POSTING:

I'm looking for folks who:

  • Are in my age range and dealing with Cholangiocarcinoma who have helpful info/tips to share.
  • Have a similar lifestyle, and have uncovered useful perspective on dealing with Cancer as it relates to (relative) Youth and/or Career.
  • Have any especially helpful resources or general advice for young-ish guys dealing with Cancer and Chemo.

&nbsp;&nbsp;

P.S. I've been lurking on Reddit for years and years. I think it's more than a bit funny it's taken something as big as a Cancer diagnosis to convince me to actually make my first post. Even my new/first (and adorable) Foster Cat didn't warrant a post...

πŸ‘︎ 5
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/siwbot1
πŸ“…︎ Sep 12 2016
🚨︎ report
Mom's Cancer has returned

So this is my first time posting on reddit but I have always found all of the information and discussion super supportive so I thought I would give it a try.

About 11 year ago my mom was diagnosed with Neuroendocrine Pancreatic Cancer. At the time she went through the Whipple procedure - I was about 12 years old and really wasn't aware until after about the severity of her condition. She has been cancer free for the past 11 years but I just today got the news that it has returned to her bones.

I am honestly at a loss for what to do. She is telling me that it is nothing I should worry about and that it is slow growing but to be honest I don't know how truthful she is being. I have crazy anxiety to begin with and have been popping xanax all day to just try to calm down.

I really want to know how worried I should be, how to talk to her about it (I am extremely bad in emotional situations and usually will kind of shut down), and most of all how I can be helpful.

Last time this happened i was a kid. Now I am an adult, I feel a responsibility to be there for her. I just want to know the best way possible without making her more stressed (she does not to like to see me stressed out).

Any advice would be much appreciated.

πŸ‘︎ 8
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/hawksmayer12345
πŸ“…︎ Jun 03 2017
🚨︎ report
My dad, type 2 diabetic, after 11 months of suffering chemo/radiation treatment for pancreatic cancer, 5 months after he was told the surgery failed and it was terminal. Brother reads off the back of a Sweet'N Low packet "...been determined to cause cancer to laboratory animals" Dad snaps back

"Bullshit! I've been using that stuff for years and...(looks at 13" scar across his stomach from whipple procedure to remove tumors, looks back at family for effect) oh... shit..."

Never lost his great attitude towards life, family, and people in general. Always quick with a joke/dad joke until the end.

πŸ‘︎ 21
πŸ“°︎ r/dadjokes
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Dude0311
πŸ“…︎ Jul 20 2017
🚨︎ report
Fuck you antipsychiatry!!

Hey Redditors docs, nurses and everybody else,

Just wanted to share my thoughts about Psychiatry and my journey towards it...

Anyway, I'm a medical student at present and entering my final year. (in ON, Canada) I did pretty well in my rotations (not boasting, just stating the facts) so am able to choose between various specialties such as Internal Medicine, Psychiatry, Family Medicine. I came into medical school wanting to do Psychiatry because I particularly enjoyed working closely with patients and people, and personally feel that Mental Illness can be far more devastating than other types of illness. During my undergrad years, I got the opportunity to do research and witness clinical psychology. I could see how Mental Illness could tear families up, how patients also have to deal with stigma and how Mental Illnesses can often become the biggest priority. Sure some patients may also have heart disease and diabetes, but the schizophrenia when uncontrolled leads to them not taking their pills and a downward spiral culminating in disaster. Then when I see how most patients with mental illness get ripped on by family members and society in general I feel like helping them all the more (Of course some family members are supportive thankfully) I see mentally ill patients with addictions and schizophrenia on the street as homeless people and I feel sad that sometimes they're seen as bums not as patients without care.

Anyway, in medical school and in society I keep picking up a negative perception towards mental illness. My family members keep trying to persuade me to pick internal medicine and do cardiology or GI given my good reference letters from internal medicine preceptors. They feel that the good pay is worth it and at least I get respect from society. Even within medicine, other students tell me not to pick Psychiatry as I won't be paid nearly as much as the more lucrative specialties such as Gastroenterology. And I won't have to put up with society's bullshit and demonization. (I keep hearing from random knowitalls how Psychiatry and Psychology is pseudo science)

Yet somehow, I still wanted to do Psychiatry. I wanted to help the vulnerable patients who have mental illnesses and make a difference in their lives. I wanted to care for them and do my part to make their lives meaningful and productive. Yet, repeatedly I get battered by people: Emergency doctors, people in the street, family members....all these people give me negative reactions when I

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πŸ‘︎ 26
πŸ“°︎ r/medicine
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πŸ‘€︎ u/drolltroll
πŸ“…︎ Oct 09 2011
🚨︎ report
Pancreatic cancer claimed my Step-Dad yesterday

My step-dad was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer two years ago. They found it by accident when he went in for some x-rays for back pain. It was a 1mm blip and still a Stage 1. They did the Whipple procedure on him. He had a rough go of it and chemo was worse, but he came through it and seemed to be cancer free. In June he had clean scans. In August he turned banana yellow. The stint they put in during the Whipple had a blockage. Scans revealed cancer in his kidneys, liver, spleen, and major lymph nodes. After that it was all downhill. He fought hard, but it finally took him. He died peacefully in his sleep at 6:41am yesterday.

We were not terribly close, because he and my mother only moved back here from New York last summer. I was in my 30's when they met. That being said he was a good guy and took care of my mom. We got along great. And she is hurting right now due to this terrible disease.

Worse yet my own wife has Stage 4 chronic breast cancer at this point. Her 3rd go round that is now in her spine. She's been watching my step-father go and she's afraid that his suffering is what is in store for her.

In short...FUCK CANCER!!!!

πŸ‘︎ 7
πŸ“°︎ r/Fuckcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/codecowboy
πŸ“…︎ Dec 07 2016
🚨︎ report
my dad is losing his fight

last may, my dad was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. on june 4, 2015, he had a whipple procedure done. he was deemed a risk candidate because of previous poor health (2 strokes, diabetes, partial paralysis, memory impairment, morbid obesity, the list goes on) but due to having very good health in his youth and having been somewhat of a body builder, his surgeon rallied and got him approved. my dad got through the surgery and was happy to have his life back.

immediately after the surgery, micro cells in lymph nodes (this is how it was explained to me by my mom) that were tested from the surgery tested positive for cancer. doctors wanted to do a round of chemo to try to prevent the spread and hoped that my dad would become cancer free. he went through a round of chemo, which finished in february, and got scans and testing done to see where he stood. pictures showed that he had small cancer tumors in his lungs, but they were largely very small (under 1 cm), so his oncologist wanted him to come back in june for more testing and scans to see if my dad should go through another round of chemo.

yesterday, my father went in to get the testing done. his doctor cancelled all of his appointments for today (including my father's), i guess something came up, but apparently the testing raised enough flags that his doctor reviewed everything and called my mom. some tumors got smaller, some got larger, but the cancer has spread further in his lungs, to his liver, and to the lymph nodes in his back. he has a lesion in his liver. the doctor says it will be incurable and if my dad wants, he could do chemo for the rest of his life to prolong it a little. his doctor wants to set up another appointment ASAP to discuss more details and timeline. my father's breathing over the last several months had been getting worse, to the point where he's gasping for breath when i speak to him on the phone. he's in a lot of pain, which seems to get worse everyday. the news wasn't a surprise to him, since he says he literally felt it coming, but it doesn't make it any better. according to my mother, my dad is emaciated. his arms and legs are twigs, his face is sunken in, his belly protrudes, and he has an excess of extra skin on his belly. before my dad's whipple last year, he weighed roughy 320 lbs. my mom is guessing he's sitting at about 160 lbs right now, with about half of the weight loss occurring very quickly over the last few months, despite my dad finally having a healthy appetit

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 10
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/kittenkissies
πŸ“…︎ Jun 30 2016
🚨︎ report
Mum just passed from PC

I don't know why I'm posting this, just hoping someone will get something out of my mum’s story. Sorry for the wall of text but here goes,

In March last year mum started getting really bad abodominal pains which would get worse when she would eat anything and more often than not she couldn't keep the food down for long. As a result she kept losing weight and being a Type 2 Diabetic her sugars were constantly fluctuating badly. Luckily my sister and I still live with her so we were able to care for her and monitor her sugars etc.

Her doctors did scans, endoscopy, and colonoscopy and couldn't find anything. At first they thought it was bacteria in the stomach, then it was the stomach lining is too thin and then they scratched their heads and didn't know what it was. I'm feel so stupid now that we didn't go out and get more opinions.

We ended up rushing her to the ER a few times in May, June, July with hypoglycaemia, in June they did scans of her abdomen but the radiologists said it was clear.

In late July one evening when we got home from work we found her weak, shaky and in pain so we took her to the ER again, thinking it was the usual hypoglycaemia and that they would do the usual of giving her fluids, stabilising sugar levels and send her home the next day. She sent us home instead of making us wait with her because they normally don't take very long finding a bed and getting started. She called us 5 hours later at midnight to say they had made her wait in the ER chairs all that time and the doctor on call came out, discharged her and berated her like she was a hypochondriac even saying "well what do you expect me to do on a Friday night?". So we got in the car (we only live 15mins from the hospital) and when we were almost at the hospital she called again to say they are now admitting her because the doctor came back into the ER to say he just checked her blood results and she had a bad liver infection!! After that they did scans and found a blockage in her bile duct which they later took scrapings of and confirmed she had pancreatic cancer that had grown into the bile duct.

A couple of weeks later she met with a surgeon but he decided to refer her to another surgeon who had more experience with difficult cases as her cancer was right up against a major artery and vein. β€œUnofficially” he confirmed for us that he could actually see the cancer on her scans from June, he estimated it to be around 2cm and it definitely should have been picke

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πŸ‘︎ 7
πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/louiepleurodon
πŸ“…︎ Jul 01 2017
🚨︎ report
I'm going to get a one-way ticket to a tropical island in 2 years.

I know... aren't we all?

My father is on his last course of treatment he will receive for his pancreatic cancer. If the costly whipple procedure does not work, he will forego any further treatment. Upon his demise, I inherit a little under $400k of property from him. Combined with my $190k condo, figure 10-15% lost in fees / taxes, what have you... Ignoring my current income... I'll be looking at $500k spending money... and no realistic ties to this place. I anticipate dying at his age of the same thing, considering my mother died young of cancer, too...

...But I don't want to buy some island...

...I want to survive in solitary confinement on a tropical island.

I'm well aware of the dangers of piracy, native peoples, insects, diesease and governments finding an expat hiding on a protected island. I'm well aware of the psychological maladies I will incur... there's more to it but I may enslist having a few others join me later on since I realize I'm in a unique position to assist others.

I own a 45-55' trawler I call the downeaster Alexa. If written elsewhere on reddit and another site about being a liveaboard on it until my dad fell ill last year. I've since erased the details until I'm certain I've wrapped up all loose ends and even still, as much as I'd love to write about every little part of my adventure, I must leave some obvious vagaries, though nobody has reason to go looking for me.

My Resume

  • 3-year Liveaboard on a former fishing trawler that I've converted myself.

  • I've disassembled and reassembled every part of my boat including near every element of the engine.

  • Spent 3 months in the Yukon in a wilderness survival school for backpacking and canoeing.

  • I've backpacked the entire Appalachian Trail twice (NoBo and SoBo)

  • I'm an okay fisherman. Haven't had a ton of practice, but can certainly improve in this regard.

  • Electrician, Mechanic, Carpenter, Survivalist, Hermit.

Before anybody brings into question the livability of the downeaster Alexa, I've been a liveaboard on it for 3 years and have traversed thousands of nautical-miles in it. With much more fuel aboard (I haven't exactly run the numbers but...) I believe it is capable of crossing the atlantic in 3-4 weeks, but that is not my intention. I would likely have it hauled to several hundred miles near where my final destination be. Since I am in the Homework Stage, I'm trying to figure my destination.

So my questions boil down to:

  • Region

  • Emergency Wuss-Out Exit

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 41
πŸ“°︎ r/IWantOut
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πŸ‘€︎ u/AlexaAgain2
πŸ“…︎ Aug 09 2011
🚨︎ report
Is there really no more solutions for a longer life in this roller coaster of multiple cancer diagnosis?

First it was a gallbladder/pancreas issue, she [my mom, age 49] got her gallbladder removed and a stent in place to her pancreas, then the stent malfunctioned causing bile to back up and extreme pain bringing her back to hospital...

Then we find out there's cancer in her bile ducts...

Then it's that the mass is in the entrance of pancreas and bile duct.

They found it so soon that everything looked very hopeful and promising and she was scheduled for a Whipple procedure.

The Whipple procedure went GREAT.

Pathology comes back that the cancer did show up in the lymph nodes that were take out with the procedure.

Okay so just in case it's anywhere else in her body she moves on to chemo, everything sounding very hopeful since they caught it so soon and she's on the best end of the spectrum to possibly be cured.

Yes it's very likely to come back, but should keep up with 6 month scans, if all goes well we'll be 5-8 years down the road cancer free.

So we all kept trying to be hopeful and positive...

But now.... She went in to start chemo Thursday, they couldn't do it... Turns out the scans showed she has cancer in her liver.... Need a new plan...

This has all happened within the matter of a couple months... we've gone from very hopeful and positive that she will live a long life... Down to hopeful she'll live another 18 months...

I guess they said they shouldn't/wouldn't have done the Whipple procedure? wtf ? ... If they had known... Well it's a damn serious procedure and it was barely even a month ago... I don't get it, so many turns in such a small amount of time...

***Don't people get liver transplants? What about that? ***

It's so hard to accept this is happening, of course you never think it's gonna happen to your family... Is there really not much of a positive outlook here?

Also does anyone have any advice on how to handle this with my youngest brother? He's 12 and of course loves his mom very very much, a total momma's boy... I (26) will likely be the one to take care of him... I saw it in his face today that he knows something's wrong, I'm so sad and scared for him, how do we let him know?

πŸ‘︎ 4
πŸ“°︎ r/AskDocs
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πŸ‘€︎ u/xsamrlx17
πŸ“…︎ Oct 08 2016
🚨︎ report
Dad has pancreatic cancer. Need some thoughts...

I'm a little fuzzy on some of the exact details due to this happening over the past year and I no longer live at home (2 hours away from my parents.) But this is the story.

This started maybe a year ago. He started getting sick with random stuff frequently. Flu, colds, nothing major. After being healthy and sick on and off for maybe 5 months he was annoyed with it and went in to see what was wrong. He always says "I only get sick once a year." Which is mostly true and is also partly the reason why he decided to go in. After the tests, it was found out he had a clogged duct from his gallbladder. So they were going to rework that and remove the gallbladder. Upon going in for surgery, they found the mass on his pancreas. They aborted that operation to talk about what needs to be done. 6 weeks ago he had a Whipple procedure done and is on the path of recovery. He had a benign tumor and a vein that was deemed cancerous removed.

Some info on him. He's 53, ~180 lbs, and 5' 10". He works out a few days out of the week, eats relatively good, and has a drink once or twice a week. He is down 20 lbs and consuming 2500-3000 calories a day to try to put weight back on. The doctors say he is recovering great and have good hopes for it all.

But he is unsure of what he wants to do or has to do once he is healthy. He has been told by his doctor he needs to do radiation and chemo to make sure its all gone. The surgeon is confident that he got it all out but also agrees he should do chemo. They are getting second and third opinions from UW Madison cancer center and another cancer center in Chicago. He has not been on board with doing chemo from the start but the latest I heard was "if that's my only option, I have to." He's really concerned about side effects and only getting a few more years since he has been told it will come back. I'm looking for suggestions, thoughts, other options, basically anything at this point.

πŸ‘︎ 4
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/snake1152
πŸ“…︎ Oct 03 2017
🚨︎ report
My 34 year old husband has advanced pancreatic cancer

He was diagnosed in the middle of June by UVA doctors. They set him up with the Whipple Procedure but when they cut him open the surgeon found out the cancer had metastasized to his liver. They cut out some liver including his dime-sized tumor then sewed him up so he could start chemo right away in hopes to do the Whipple in 6 months. He has had his second round of Fulfirinox (f-u, iritican, and oxyplatin) which went well and according to the PET scan he got after his first round, his lymph nodes and liver are no longer lit up. This is great news. I'm still really sad. This kid is my best friend and the father of our 6 yr old and almost 4 yr old. This cancer is aggressive and I know the statistics. I guess I'm trying to reach out. Is there anyone who has been in this similar situation? Anyone who has had advanced pancreatic cancer, blasted w chemo, then had the Whipple?

Edit: changed month from July to June.

πŸ‘︎ 14
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Kzamonster
πŸ“…︎ Sep 12 2015
🚨︎ report
Has anyone had a "Whipple" procedure?

I found out today I'm having this surgery for chronic pancreatitis. The thought of this is very intimidating as it's considered one of the most difficult, invasive, and painful surgeries with a lengthy recovery time. It involves removing most of my pancreas, my gall bladder and a portion of my small intestines. I hope it stops the intense and perpetual abdomen pain I've had for years. I would love to hear anyone's experience with it.

πŸ‘︎ 9
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Seethist
πŸ“…︎ Jan 08 2018
🚨︎ report
Dad diagnosed

Two weeks ago, my dad was admitted to the hospital thinking he would just get his gall bladder removed and go home soon. Then the doctors found out that he has a tumor in his bile duct.

He had the ERCP procedure done to put a metal stint and drainage tube in and let the backed up bile leave his body. The doctor said that he believed it was cancer but we had to wait until the biopsy results came back. He was released from the hospital on thanksgiving day and was happy to be home. Today we found out the biopsy results and he has been diagnosed with stage two pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The surgeon has told us that a Whipple procedure will be done soon after chemo. The life expectancy isn’t extremely long even if the procedure is a success . I’m scared that things won’t work out in the end.

These past two weeks have been crazy and My mom and I do not know how to deal with everything that’s been going on. She’s been emotional but tries not to let herself fall apart around me or my dad. I tend to keep things in and not show them but on the inside I’m absolutely terrified. I’m 17 and scared to lose my dad and go through all of this at such a young age. My dad is already telling me to be there for my mom and take care of her. I don’t know what to do and feel like I’m going to explode one day. I try not to think about it but it’s constantly in my head. I can’t imagine what my dad is feeling.

If you have read this thank you. I needed to vent.

πŸ‘︎ 15
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/livvvvvy2
πŸ“…︎ Dec 04 2019
🚨︎ report
Cigna is denying me pancreatic cancer care

Hi all, this is cross posted. Originally posted in LegalAdvice and they suggested I try here as well to see if anyone has any ideas on how to proceed. I have some ideas on progress via looking for an attorney, filing an appeal, etc. But was curious if any of you can think of a way to get some help for me quickly. Unfortunately, if I have to go through a whole appeal with Cigna, that could take too long. As of right now, I have ZERO medical care I can access. Normal doctors wont touch me because I am above their pay grade and MD Anderson wont see me because Cigna wont let them as you will read about below.

I have a 3 cm tumor on my pancreas. I was getting treatment at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas. I live in Texas. Pancreatic cancer treatment is a highly specific field and my doctor is one of the top five doctors in the world.

Essentially, my doctor did a biopsy in December on it and told me to come back in March for him to take another look. When I went in March, he told me that in the three months since December, my tumor had DOUBLED in size and the wall of the tumor had started to change, which highly unusual and is a sign that the tumor is rapidly progressing. My blood work however, was still fairly normal. Because the only treatment for me involves him doing a surgery called The Whipple Procedure (removing six of my organs and rerouting my entire digestive tract), he wanted to take a wait and see approach and wanted me to come back in 2-3 to have him take another look at what it has done. He very specifically told me that I cannot wait to see him any longer than 2-3 months, and made me promise I would attend that appointment. I have been on pins and needles since March wondering what it is doing. I am also very sick with all kinds of symptoms. Of course, I cannot go to a regular doctor for help..they stand there and look at me and say "Your diagnosis is above my pay grade. I don't know how to help you. Call your MD Anderson team."

However, some RN Case Manager at Cigna, my health insurance company, has now decided that my tumor is not "big enough" so my appointment and scans with my doctor are "not needed". They are refusing to authorize my scans/bloodwork/cat scans, despite a MD saying they are urgently needed, and as a result, MD Anderson has cancelled all of my appointments leaving me completely without any medical care. They claim they know better than an MD Anderson Pancreatic Surgeon and I only need to see him once a year. LOL. It's

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 83
πŸ“°︎ r/Insurance
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πŸ‘€︎ u/GadgetQueen
πŸ“…︎ Jun 06 2019
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Starting all this with my mom

###The story so far:

My mom went in to the hospital in March for an ulcer. They had a hard time cauterizing it. Finally it was all done and she was home and doing better. But then a week later she started vomiting and was unable to keep any food down. They thought the way the ulcer had healed had narrowed the exit of her stomach. But they were wrong. It turns out she had a cancerous tumor on her pancreas (middle of April now)

They also found a fibroid in her uterus and cysts on her ovaries. Her liver looks clear, but they potentially found 2 small nodes on her lungs (the radiologist said he wasn't too concerned about them)

She promptly had the Whipple procedure and a full hysterectomy. The surgery took 14 hours and was the longest day of my life. It has been an emotional rollercoaster. My mom has stayed so positive and upbeat though. She always did what the PT/OT asked. She sat in a chair the day after surgery. Started walking, assisted, the day after that. She had wonderful nurses and so much support from family and friends.


###Now:

everything from the hysterectomy came back benign.

Her meeting with the surgeon is tomorrow to determine what steps are next.


###I'm not sure what to do next myself.

I live a few states away. If she ends up not having much time left I will of course move to be closer.

During her surgery I left work for 2 weeks to be with her. I live in Montana where the rest of my mom's family is. I know at some point she'll want to come back here to visit. I'm hoping she can between bouts of chemo.


It's all really hard. It's scary. I have been an emotional mess since this all started. I can read your stories and cry. I can watch an episode of parks and rec and see something dumb, but wholesome, and cry.

I'm only 32 and I thought I had so much more time to spend with my mom. This whole thing is really wrecking me.

πŸ‘︎ 11
πŸ“°︎ r/pancreaticcancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/d15ko
πŸ“…︎ May 14 2019
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So my mom quit going to the doctor.

My mom has pancreatic cancer. She was diagnosed last January and had the Whipple Procedure done last July. She went through chemo and kept her cancer cells in check. They never fully eradicated it, but they got it down to a decent level where things were looking good.

She was going through this for over a year basically on her own in a different state, until my sister (who lived with her) graduated high school. Well, she graduated and they moved back home, so she could be with the rest of her family last month.

Now that she's home, she's so depressed being with her husband (who is a pretty big jerk. He's been living in my childhood home without going to be with her while she's going through this), that she quit going to the doctor.

Today I asked her if she's been to the doctor yet to see how her cancer was going, and she immediately started crying. She said she doesn't want to live anymore in her current state of life, dealing with my stepdad and feeling so alone.

I'll be honest, I'm pretty devastated. She's fought so hard and was so, so lucky they caught the cancer when they did. She has one of the most deadly forms of cancer and she's survived this long only to let some asshole literally drain her will to live. She's gotten so far and is finally back home with her family, and she quit going to the doctor because she doesn't care anymore.

I'm upset. I want her to keep going. I've come to terms with the chance she may pass away sometime in the near future. But with the fight she's been putting up and how well she's been doing, I am absolutely pissed she's going to throw it away.

This is more a rant than anything, but I'm really fucking sad. But I have so many things going on in my life that it's one more thing to crush down inside. I want her to keep trying. I'm not ready to lose my mom, and she deserves more years with her grandchildren and family.

Thanks, guys.

πŸ‘︎ 12
πŸ“°︎ r/cancer
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πŸ‘€︎ u/destroymysweatr
πŸ“…︎ Jun 28 2017
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