26 year old, unemployed physician. It's 4 in the afternoon and I'm still in my bathrobe. Please roast some sense into me!
πŸ‘︎ 13k
πŸ“°︎ r/RoastMe
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/bluebirdsandrain
πŸ“…︎ Jan 10
🚨︎ report
Administrators and physicians that are at home getting the vaccine instead of the frontline workers
πŸ‘︎ 47k
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/lucynyu13
πŸ“…︎ Dec 18 2020
🚨︎ report
TIL Alexander Graham Bell invented the metal detector to try and find the bullet lodge in President James Garfield. The device worked but had interference from the metal springs in the bed. The chief physician only allowed a search of the right side of the body. The bullet was on the left side. history.com/news/10-thing…
πŸ‘︎ 6k
πŸ“°︎ r/todayilearned
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/TirelessGuardian
πŸ“…︎ Jan 21
🚨︎ report
Trying to schedule an appointment with a physician and the receptionist keeps saying PAs are physicians
πŸ‘︎ 4k
πŸ“°︎ r/medicalschool
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/Procrastinator001
πŸ“…︎ Jan 13
🚨︎ report
A way for unmatched physicians to contribute to the clinic has come!!! Support for your future colleagues struggle.

Arizona SB1271 was just reintroduced to allow unmatched physicians to practice medicine under direct supervision while awaiting reapplication to The Match. Ask your legislators to support this bill here!

SB 1271: Increase Access to Primary Care in Arizona (mailchi.mp)

πŸ‘︎ 2k
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ“…︎ Jan 21
🚨︎ report
Attending physician and NYTimes columnist rips peds resident trying to do H&P

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/05/well/live/hospitals-medical-errors.html

TLDR: Physician parent of child with appendicitis "hisses" at admitting peds resident trying to examine patient and couches it as preventing medical error.

She went to a teaching hospital, one where she herself is faculty and is belligerent to the resident. I'm sure the peds resident didn't want to cause more distress to that ill child but has to do an admission H&P. I'm sure the resident would rather not be working at 3am having not seen their own child for almost 24 hours. Now it's published in the NY Times as an example of something people could do if they want to prevent harm to their loved ones.

πŸ‘︎ 879
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/bunreddit
πŸ“…︎ Jan 07
🚨︎ report
Father (ER physician) was denied COVID vaccine because not enough people at his hospital want it

I hope this is okay to post, but I don't know where else to turn for advice. I'll keep this short and sweet.

My father is an ER physician for a small rural hospital in the South. His hospital received the vaccine about 2 weeks ago, and since then they have been giving him the run-around -- saying he'll receive it tomorrow or the next day (over and over again.) Last night he was told they can open a vial only if 10 people sign on to receive it. He stayed 3 hours after his shift to round up willing staff, but walked away with only 5 names.

I am absolutely livid as his daughter watching him work his ass off for months now only to be denied the vaccine. I worry every single day about him and would do anything to get him vaccinated as soon as possible. Does anyone have any advice on how to proceed?

EDIT 1/2/2020: Thank you everyone who replied with advice. I'm sorry I didn't get the chance to respond sooner. When I posted this, it was automatically removed by a bot, and I didn't realize a mod had gone in and approved it.

My dad has a few days off this coming week, so he'll be looking at some of suggestions given here. We'll see if a public health department or major hospital nearby can get it done.

And for those complaining that I left out details, of course I did! It's the Internet. I'm not going to go into specifics about my fathers whereabouts or his career. And, yes, the moderna vaccine is a 10-dose vial. And, yes, there is severe vaccine skepticism everywhere -- especially in Trump country. And, yes, very tiny and poor hospitals exist.

EDIT 2: I just talked some more with my dad about this thread, and some of you are really struggling to imagine just how small (but unbelievably busy) a hospital can get. That made him chuckle! But again, thank you, thank you to everyone. He has had literally 0 time to look into it over the holidays (other than the vials that are just sitting in the freezer taunting him), so I took it into my own hands to ask for advice. I didn't know where to start but I've learned a lot.

πŸ‘︎ 2k
πŸ“°︎ r/medicine
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/emmyloo22
πŸ“…︎ Jan 01
🚨︎ report
Physician acts to close NP endocrine clinic that killed 2 patients and injured many more.

This podcast
https://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/patients-at-risk/boards-of-nursing-fail-to-lUANkeWsZF-/

Details the case of an NP in Texas who was promoting himself as an endocrinologist, and killed two patients, injuring many others.

The outline:
KM was the graduate of an online NP school. Soon after graduation, he opened his own hormone clinic. Texas is a supervised state, his supervisor was a surgeon 140 miles away, who had no knowledge of what he was doing.

Amy Townsend, MD is a local physician who became aware of what he was doing because a friend went to KM for a refill of his synthroid. KM ordered 63 lab tests before even seeing the patient. His testosterone was normal, but he was given IM testosterone anyway. Dr. Townsend was aware of another patient of this clinic who had died at age 45 of an MI after large doses of testosterone. And then another death came to light. She made a formal complaint to the Board of Nursing. During this process, she found he had 13 other complaints lodged against him pending. The BON did nothing for many months, KM continued his practice unchanged. Dr. Townsend finally demanded to meet the BON in person, and drove 5 hours to do so. In the meeting they said they didn't have anyone with enough expertise to judge him. Dr. Townsend herself found an endocrinologist to review his practices, the BON did not extend themselves to do this. Over a year later, his license was removed.

What to learn from this:

  1. there are NPs practicing with little training who will hurt people (The EliteNursePractitioner.com will even help NPs set up such practices. THey have a video course on endocrinology that the NP can buy, and they offer advice on the business aspects. THey will help the NP find a supervisor who wont' bother them.

  2. Ethical NPs, RNs and Physicians are the only protection for patients, We can recognize this and take steps. Patients and other laypeople cannot.

  3. Doing the right thing, as Dr. Townsend did, can be hard. And exhausting. But, we know what the right thing to do is. I would be pretty sure Dr. Townsend saved some lives.

πŸ‘︎ 2k
πŸ“°︎ r/medicine
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/pshaffer
πŸ“…︎ Dec 28 2020
🚨︎ report
Attending physician and NYT columnist pens her experience on the receiving end of medical care nytimes.com/2021/01/05/we…
πŸ‘︎ 705
πŸ“°︎ r/medicine
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/BigRodOfAsclepius
πŸ“…︎ Jan 07
🚨︎ report
hi i am monica gandhi - infectious diseases physician and professor at ucsf

hi i am monica gandhi - infectious diseases physician and professor at ucsf

πŸ‘︎ 337
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ“…︎ Jan 19
🚨︎ report
I would like to know why MD residents, who are physicians, and have way more training hours than midlevels (aka PA and NP) and WORK way harder make less than them?

What actions you think should be taken regarding this matter?

πŸ‘︎ 591
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/DrBrendaNP
πŸ“…︎ Jan 17
🚨︎ report
HHS Will Drop Buprenorphine Waiver Rule for Most Physicians

HHS will drop x-waiver requirement for most physicians to be able to access buprenorphine therapy. I am optimistic this will help improve access to treatment for opiod use disorder patients. Will you be more likely to prescribe buprenorphine in your practice? What concerns do you have regarding this change?

Medscape article here

πŸ‘︎ 535
πŸ“°︎ r/medicine
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/Oo_Cipher_oO
πŸ“…︎ Jan 22
🚨︎ report
-25 downvotes on the medicine subreddit, for a post saying that physician advocacy groups should advance the interests of physicians. This is why midlevels are outgunning us at every turn.
πŸ‘︎ 1k
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/Feedbackplz
πŸ“…︎ Jan 14
🚨︎ report
We just want to see a physician

Want to start of by saying I'm not a resident but I think I share your sentiment towards midlevels. Also, I am a "midlevel". I'm a Pathologists' assistant who provides a service to the doctors I'm assisting and have no interest in doctoring.

Now that that's out of the way...

My partner was diagnosed with an intratesticular mass almost 4 weeks ago and we've yet to see a urologist. We've contacted and gotten referrals to 3 urology practices. We've been unable to meet with a urologist to discuss surgical options at any of them. We've had to wait weeks to have a pointless appointment at 2 practices with a NP who cannot answer our questions and respond with "you'll have to make an appointment with my doctor for that". So we leave frustrated to make another appointment 2 more weeks out to have the opportunity to talk to a physician that can actually treat him.

Maybe I'm a little biased and am not understanding how this stupid system works, or I'm having a selfish moment for wanting care now.

Or maybe midlevel providers are creating a barrier to getting adequate care and I've now experienced it first hand.

πŸ‘︎ 765
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/PathAThrowAway
πŸ“…︎ Jan 18
🚨︎ report
Annoyed: Female physicians are not named β€œsweetie” or β€œ[first name]”. Female physicians are called Dr. β€œSo-and-so” just like the men.

Article

^^ article discussing professional variation in titles. Not only is it annoying it’s just unprofessional.

πŸ‘︎ 537
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/CocosMadHatter
πŸ“…︎ Jan 13
🚨︎ report
TIL that during the Black Death, the physician to the Papacy recognized that bloodletting was ineffective, but he continued to prescribe bleeding for members of the Roman Curia, whom he disliked. He also claimed that all true cases of plague were caused by astrological factors, and were incurable en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bla…
πŸ‘︎ 15k
πŸ“°︎ r/todayilearned
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/malalatargaryen
πŸ“…︎ Dec 08 2020
🚨︎ report
Nurses can not override physician orders. Nor can pharmacists. If you really think my order is wrong, go to my attending not a fucking nurse.

Have a brittle diabetic patient. Like she missed a dose of levemir and went into DKA the next day.

I put in an order for levemir with insulin drip because of how brittle my patients is. Pharmacist questioned me about my orders. Which is fine, it’s good to double check. But after I explained they called the nurse to see if this was something they have done before.

Like, fuck you. If you are going to question my orders and then also my explanation, go to someone who can override me, like my attending. Not a fucking nurse.

Also want to vent about the nurses taking care of this patient. I put in stat labs, they aren’t done until 2 hours later. I put in for the insulin drip, they wait four hours to start it. They held her evening levemir because her blood glucose level was 83 before dinner. Like, they are actively trying to kill my patient.

πŸ‘︎ 918
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/osteopath17
πŸ“…︎ Jan 02
🚨︎ report
tHeReS a pHySiCiAn sHoRtAgE
πŸ‘︎ 2k
πŸ“°︎ r/premed
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/aphinion
πŸ“…︎ Jan 05
🚨︎ report
Lost (another) physician colleague to suicide

I lost another physician colleague to suicide. We knew he was struggling some, but none of us had any idea the severity. I have lost two other colleagues through the years also to suicide. When will we find answers to this (other) pandemic of physician suicide? It's so hard to watch losing another incredible member of our community; I just feel so powerless. Hang in there, everybody.. rough few months ahead still.

Any words of wisdom out there? We are picking up many of his patients, and it's such a struggle to read his notes and realize he's not coming back. Just surreal.

πŸ‘︎ 1k
πŸ“°︎ r/medicine
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/orchana
πŸ“…︎ Dec 29 2020
🚨︎ report
Why do NPs completely disregard the sizable and increasing number of first-generation physicians that have sacrificed so much for the privilege to practice medicine.
πŸ‘︎ 334
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/ih8carl
πŸ“…︎ Jan 16
🚨︎ report
Financial payments from the drug industry to U.S. physicians was associated with increased prescribing of the paying drug company's drug. The association was consistent across all studies and several studies presented evidence that the association was not correlation, but causation. eurekalert.org/pub_releas…
πŸ‘︎ 15k
πŸ“°︎ r/science
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/mvea
πŸ“…︎ Nov 23 2020
🚨︎ report
Physicians can’t just own the term doctor REEEE
πŸ‘︎ 2k
πŸ“°︎ r/medicalschool
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/the-25th-night
πŸ“…︎ Dec 30 2020
🚨︎ report
Jonny Kim, 36, Navy SEAL, Harvard trained physician, NASA's first Korean-American astronaut
πŸ‘︎ 58k
πŸ“°︎ r/pics
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/ohnoh18
πŸ“…︎ Oct 11 2020
🚨︎ report
Is it more difficult to be accepted into physician assistant school than medical school? Here are the facts.

Before I begin, I want to emphasize, this post is not about the role of non-physicians in medical care or scope of practice. This is also not about who is smarter.

This post is simply about the frequently asserted claim, particularly on social media, that it is more difficult to be accepted into physician assistant school than medical school.

The data below is from MD applicants/matriculants from 2019-2020, DO applicants/matriculants from 2018-2019 (most recent report) and PA applicants/matriculants from 2019-2020 (as well as limited additional information from 2016-2017, see * below).

Acceptance Rate:

PA - 32.3%

  • Matriculants: 8,802
  • Applicants: 27,283
  • Programs: 238

DO - 35.3%

  • Matriculants: 7,415
  • Applicants: 20,981
  • Programs: 36

MD - 40.9%

  • Matriculants: 21,869
  • Applicants: 53,370
  • Programs: 155

GPA Science:

PA

  • Applicants: 3.27*
  • Matriculants: 3.52 SD 0.15

DO

  • Applicants: 3.36 SD 0.38
  • Matriculants: 3.49 SD 0.29

MD

  • Applicants: 3.48 SD 0.43
  • Matriculants: 3.66 SD 0.30

GPA Overall:

PA

  • Applicants: 3.36*
  • Matriculants: 3.58 SD 0.14

DO

  • Applicants: 3.46 SD 0.33
  • Matriculants: 3.56 SD 0.26

MD

  • Applicants: 3.58 SD 0.33
  • Matriculants: 3.73 SD 0.24

MCAT/GRE Percentile:

All medical schools require applicants to take the MCAT. The most commonly required test for PA school applicants is the GRE. The GRE is required by 57.7% of schools. The MCAT or GRE is required by 6.2%. Only the MCAT is required by 1.3%, with the SAT, ACT, CASPer composing the remaining required exams.

PA (GRE) - Applicants:

  • Verbal: 151.6 (~53rd percentile)*
  • Quantitative: 150.9 (~43rd percentile)*
  • Combined: 48th percentile*

PA (GRE) - Matriculants:

  • Verbal: 153 (59th percentile) SD 3.4
  • Quantitative: 153 (48th percentile) SD 3.2
  • Combined: ~54th percentile

DO (MCAT)

  • Applicants: 502 (56th percentile) SD 7.46
  • Matriculants: 504 (63rd percentile) SD 5.21

MD (MCAT)

  • Applicants: 506.1 (69th percentile) SD 9.3
  • Matriculants: 511.5 (85th percentile) SD 6.5

Discussion:

So, is it more difficult to be accepted into physician assistant school than medical school?

Technically, yes. Actually, no.

Yes, a smaller percentage of PA applicants are accepted. And, yes, it is true that PA matriculants have slightly better science and overall GPAs than DO matriculants. However, on a whole, the competitiveness of PA applicants is less than that of MD/DO applicants. MD matriculants have substantiall

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 704
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/DrThirdOpinion
πŸ“…︎ Dec 30 2020
🚨︎ report
US News openly shilling for midlevels. "Often, the physician or surgeon supervision is more like collaboration, but there are certain archaic regulations that make life for physician assistants – and their patients – difficult." money.usnews.com/careers/…
πŸ‘︎ 746
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/Feedbackplz
πŸ“…︎ Jan 13
🚨︎ report
There is an enormous demonstration going on at Stanford Hospital right now carried out by staff, who are protesting the decision by higher ups to give vaccines to some administrators and physicians who are at home and not in contact with patients INSTEAD of frontline workers. Source - NYT Mike Isaac
πŸ‘︎ 4k
πŸ“°︎ r/CoronavirusUS
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ“…︎ Dec 18 2020
🚨︎ report
"Doctoral" PAs, more worried about their own professional prestige than patient care, want to force physicians to abandon the title "doctor" so they can use it.
πŸ‘︎ 199
πŸ“°︎ r/Noctor
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/ebeagledeeteeg
πŸ“…︎ Jan 18
🚨︎ report
Our physician medical director > your physician medical director
πŸ‘︎ 1k
πŸ“°︎ r/ems
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/torsades_
πŸ“…︎ Jan 14
🚨︎ report
Classic: Emory Professor explains the educational & training DISPARITIES between physicians and non-physician practitioners (NPPs) while they lobby politicians to pass an NP Full Practice Authority (FPA) bill granting them the right to instantly & independently practice medicine. v.redd.it/6pnzh8i7z7461
πŸ‘︎ 3k
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/ih8carl
πŸ“…︎ Dec 09 2020
🚨︎ report
unbelievable physician story dealing with Covid patients
πŸ‘︎ 5k
πŸ“°︎ r/Fuckthealtright
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/Active-Ad-233
πŸ“…︎ Dec 27 2020
🚨︎ report
WARNING: Weird Reddit "scam" targetting pro-physician led care accounts

There is someone going around targetting accounts that speak out against midlevels on Reddit. I'm not sure what the scam is or what they intend to do, but two people have been contacted already with a similar story.

A random user contacts you via Reddit chat from a new but "clean" account (all post history deleted). They basically say something along the lines of: "I saw that you are a doctor and I have a question about whether what my doctor is doing is professional. I am a 15-year-old and don't feel comfortable speaking to my parents about it. My question is that my doctor is crossing some boundaries and I want to know what to do."

If you respond, they just keep trying to trap you in some weird ethical dilemma. If you are contacted by someone, just ignore it. It's not your job to help unverified weirdos online.

The two user accounts that were used so far are: u/AliceParker22 and u/horselover2267

πŸ‘︎ 147
πŸ“°︎ r/Noctor
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/devilsadvocateMD
πŸ“…︎ Jan 17
🚨︎ report
Do you foresee physician salaries rising or getting lower in the next few decades?

I know this can be more speciality dependent, but overall, do you think salaries will continue to rise or get lower? I’ve seen arguments on both sides, especially with the growing number of midlevels. Some people have argued that midlevels will drive our salaries down or at least infringe on job security because they will hire more people to do our job.

But I’ve also seen others argue that our salaries have to remain high to incentivize students going to Ned school, and also (counterintuitively) our higher salaries are what make midlevels more competitive, because if physicians started making the same or only a little more than midlevels, there would be less incentive for administrators to hire a midlevel when they can hire a physician.

Thoughts?

πŸ‘︎ 97
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/MzJay453
πŸ“…︎ Jan 18
🚨︎ report
Theoretical Question: Do Family Medicine Residencies truly not prepare Physicians for Internal-Medicine Subspecialties the same as IM Residencies despite the extensive/intensive amount of years needed to pursue that fellowship anyways?

Disclaimer This is in no way shape or form meant to be an attack on Internal Medicine or to create a Midlevel vs Physician or Internal Medicine vs Family Medicine Debate **

Both are incredibly important members of the healthcare team, whether they're serving as Outpatient PCPs or Inpatient Hospitalists, Family Physicians and General Internal Medicine Physicians complete and learn many of the same sets of skills.

However, when FM Physicians are learning Ob and Peds, IM Physicians are focusing more on Intensive-Care and Inpatient management of complex medical problems.

However, my theoretical question is: Many FM Physicians today ultimately, despite their varied FM residency training, practice in a manner very similarly to General IM-PCPs. In theory, IM PCPs can go back and complete a fellowship in any of the IM-subspecialties (GI, Cards, Endo, Rheum, ID, etc. etc.) -- These are intensive 3-5 year long fellowships that train physicians to be a subspecialist.

I understand on the surface - That more Inpatient and more Intensive Care time in residency - Will better prepare IM Physicians for Subspecialty Training - But, there are many FM Physicians and many FM Residency programs that are far more Inpatient/Subspecialty based than others. I understand the concern here is therefore lack of uniformity, and therefore no way to determine if one FM Physician or or not will be able to succeed in lets say a Cardiology fellowship. However, what if there was qualifying exams for those interested in Subspecialty training afterwards?

With the amount of internal medicine and adult medicine family physicians learn, is it truly unreasonable to think that they would be incompetent cardiologists after 3 years of additional intensive learning? What skills would a FM physician be lacking that would make them inadequate diagnostic Cardiologists? Couldn't they just do a few more elective months in the ICU to get more inpatient time and make themselves more adept at this style of medicine before pursuing fellowship?

What if they had a deep passion for Cardiology and studied for it outside of their regular requirements and could ace a "Cardiology Fellowship Application Exam" if such a thing were to be put in place?

I'm not asking this question because I actually think FM should be able to do subspecialty training. This is more for me to try and really understand if there is actually knowledge gaps that would bar Family Physicians from subspecialty training, or if this is

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 45
πŸ“°︎ r/medicine
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/KeikoTanaka
πŸ“…︎ Jan 20
🚨︎ report
Letter to Lawmakers re: Physician Shortage

**UPDATED***

Alright, just shooting my shot and trying to do my part to advocate for this profession. Below is a first draft I put together to email and mail to every senator and congressperson in the country.

  1. This is a first draft. I'm not a writer so don't kill me over this. Threw down a bunch of ideas. So, all tips on what I should add or take out are welcome. I'll edit until we have a final draft
  2. Please volunteer to participate and send( email, postage) this to the law makers in your state once this letter is complete
  3. Keep pushing, keep working and keep the faith. I think with work, we can create some positive change

Dear ( senator/congressman)

America is in the midst of a healthcare crisis. Despite being a developed country, the U.S. spends nearly twice as much on healthcare as the average Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) country β€” yet has the lowest life expectancy, worst health outcomes and highest suicide rates among the 11 nations (https://www.commonwealthfund.org/publications/issue-briefs/2020/jan/us-health-care-global-perspective-2019). To make matters worse, we simply do not have enough highly trained people to manage this issue.

According to a report from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) β€œ The Complexities of Physician Supply and Demand: Projections From 2018 to 2033” ( June 2020) The United States could see an estimated shortage of between 54,100 and 139,000 physicians, including shortfalls in both primary and specialty care, by 2033. The population continues to grow and both sick, healthy, poor and wealthy need access to care that is in short supply.

Many laws have been put into place to try and remedy this matter by giving Nurse Practitioners(NP) and Physician Assistants(PA) full practice authority to help bridge this physician shortage. Advance practice practitioners are valuable members of every healthcare team, however their shortened educational programs and clinical hours that are far exceeded by 3rd and 4th year medical students simply does not make them a replacement for the extensive and intense training of physicians. The solution to the physician shortage is not to give NPs/PAs more autonomy, what we need is more physicians So long as NPs and PAs continue to acquire full practice authority, this shortage will only worsen. They are cheaper to hire and mostl

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 159
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/Aquarius121
πŸ“…︎ Jan 18
🚨︎ report
David Chao, former team physician for the Chargers, explains why he believes Mahomes did not suffer a concussion based on video evidence and that he will be fine to play on Sunday outkick.com/david-chao-md…
πŸ‘︎ 50
πŸ“°︎ r/nfl
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/mizChE
πŸ“…︎ Jan 20
🚨︎ report
Walter Reed Attending Physician Calls Trump's Brief Drive-By 'Political Theater' And 'Insanity' baltimore.cbslocal.com/20…
πŸ‘︎ 38k
πŸ“°︎ r/politics
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/last1yoususpect
πŸ“…︎ Oct 04 2020
🚨︎ report
NP insists she has been elected a fellow of ACC (a role reserved for physicians)
πŸ‘︎ 152
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/M4Anxiety
πŸ“…︎ Jan 15
🚨︎ report
Medscape Physician Lifestyle & Happiness Report 2021 medscape.com/slideshow/20…
πŸ‘︎ 57
πŸ“°︎ r/medicine
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/capkap77
πŸ“…︎ Jan 21
🚨︎ report
Does anyone find it kinda odd that physicians don’t utilize/build lobbying power to get policies that benefit our profession?

What’s up with that?

So many powerful groups in our country mobilize to protect their own interests. How the hell did physicians - with all that we work for and all that we have to lose - get swindled out of a seat at the bargaining table by a bunch of nurses? And when are we gonna stand up for ourselves?

I know we clown nurses for taking classes on health policy as part of their training, but shit...maybe medical students need to start doing this too. Too many health policies are made with absolutely no input from doctors. Will this next generation of physicians finally be the ones to make a difference?

πŸ‘︎ 126
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/MzJay453
πŸ“…︎ Jan 21
🚨︎ report
Illinois department of public health lumps in PAs and NPs with MDs as physicians and leaves out DOs

https://covidvaccination.dph.illinois.gov/?fbclid=IwAR2m4jdRlK73likAGwp3XR_Qu92SM21mr1swnkz_4QKRBqNqEU_ouKulCRw

Phase 1A: Healthcare Personnel & Long-Term Care Facility (LTCF) residents & staff.

Long-term care residents, defined by the CDC as adults who reside in facilities that provide a range of services, including medical and personal care, to persons who are unable to live independently, and staff at Skilled Nursing Facilities, Assisted Living Facilities, Residential Treatment Centers for Substance Abuse, etc. LTCF staff includes;

LTCF Staff: Nurses and Nursing Assistants, Physicians (MD, NP, PA), Respiratory Technicians, Dentists and Hygienists, LTCF Facility Staff, Pharmacists, Mental Health Clinicians, Environmental Services Staff, Reception Staff, Medical Facility Surveyor, Dietary staff, Interpreters, Laundry & security staff.

πŸ‘︎ 145
πŸ“°︎ r/Noctor
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/FloridlyQuixotic
πŸ“…︎ Jan 19
🚨︎ report
Can we all vow as future physicians that if we have medical students, we DO NOT make them sit in the hallway outside our office and only speak to them between patients?

The amount of times this has happened to me on rotations is astronomical. I know it's COVID but it feels bad!!!!! And you really can't ask any good questions in the 4 feet of hallway between the patient's room and the doc's office.

πŸ‘︎ 230
πŸ“°︎ r/medicalschool
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/bollox_pemphigoid
πŸ“…︎ Jan 20
🚨︎ report
Hospital fires ED docs and replaces them with midlevels during a pandemic. Then, they realize they need physicians and are begging physicians to volunteer their time and supervise NPs
πŸ‘︎ 398
πŸ“°︎ r/Noctor
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/devilsadvocateMD
πŸ“…︎ Jan 06
🚨︎ report
TIL that Queen Elizabeths grandfather, King George V, was euthanized by his physician. The physician wrote in his journal that he euthanized the King so that his death would be announced in the morning newspapers, rather than the "less appropriate evening journals". wikipedia.org/wiki/George…
πŸ‘︎ 3k
πŸ“°︎ r/todayilearned
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/Try_Another_NO
πŸ“…︎ Dec 05 2020
🚨︎ report
when you see another med student in the physician’s lounge [meme] v.redd.it/jlcvcjzxpq561
πŸ‘︎ 3k
πŸ“°︎ r/medicalschool
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/ParaphimosisJones
πŸ“…︎ Dec 17 2020
🚨︎ report
β€œACEP strongly opposes the use of the term β€˜doctor’ by other professionals in the clinical setting, including by those with independent practice, where there is strong potential to mislead patients into perceiving they are being treated by a physician” acep.org/patient-care/pol…
πŸ‘︎ 1k
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/ih8carl
πŸ“…︎ Dec 14 2020
🚨︎ report
Would like to make an evidence based claim for insisting on physician oversight

I’m a nurse, not a resident. If I wanted to be a doctor, I would have gone to medical school.

I have no problem taking orders from physicians. That’s my job. However, I’m frustrated that committees of administrators who do not have a single physician involved, make decisions that are ill-informed and adversely affect patient care.

I’d like to insist on physician oversight of the projects that are being developed by administrators and non clinical staff and rolled without review. I’m struggling to find evidence that addresses physician oversight of of administration/policy/QAQI. Most of what I’ve found is related to physician oversight of physicians, administrator oversight of physicians, and of course midlevel oversight.

If someone can point me in a useful direction, I would greatly appreciate it.

πŸ‘︎ 318
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/PMS_Avenger_0909
πŸ“…︎ Jan 18
🚨︎ report
Do you think AMA is doing enough to advocate for physician interests? Join AMA or PPP?

Tried to RSVP for the AMA's upcoming presentation on scope creep but it turns out my student membership has lapsed, but I don't feel like being a member benefitted me anyway. As a soon to be intern, I'm considering supporting AMA or PPP. I'm leaning towards PPP as that seems to align with my main concerns right now, but was curious about what others thought, do you feel the AMA advocates effectively on your behalf?

πŸ‘︎ 159
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/Shankmonkey
πŸ“…︎ Jan 22
🚨︎ report
X-post from r/residency: A way for unmatched physicians to contribute to the clinic has come!!! Support for your future colleagues struggle.

Arizona SB1271 was just reintroduced to allow unmatched physicians to practice medicine under direct supervision while awaiting reapplication to The Match. Ask your legislators to support this bill here!

SB 1271: Increase Access to Primary Care in Arizona (mailchi.mp)

πŸ‘︎ 710
πŸ“°︎ r/medicalschool
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/Headkickerchamp
πŸ“…︎ Jan 22
🚨︎ report
Online degreed NP starts endocrine clinic, kills two patients. Only stopped when Physician forces the Board of Nursing to take action

This podcasthttps://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/patients-at-risk/boards-of-nursing-fail-to-lUANkeWsZF-/

Details the case of an NP in Texas who was promoting himself as an endocrinologist, and killed two patients, injuring many others.

The outline:KM was the graduate of an online NP school. Soon after graduation, he opened his own hormone clinic. Texas is a supervised state, his supervisor was a surgeon 140 miles away, who had no knowledge of what he was doing.

Amy Townsend, MD is a local physician who became aware of what he was doing because a friend went to KM for a refill of his synthroid. KM ordered 63 lab tests before even seeing the patient. His testosterone was normal, but he was given IM testosterone anyway. Dr. Townsend was aware of another patient of this clinic who had died at age 45 of an MI after large doses of testosterone. And then another death came to light. She made a formal complaint to the Board of Nursing. During this process, she found he had 13 other complaints lodged against him pending. The BON did nothing for many months, KM continued his practice unchanged. Dr. Townsend finally demanded to meet the BON in person, and drove 5 hours to do so. In the meeting they said they didn't have anyone with enough expertise to judge him. Dr. Townsend herself found an endocrinologist to review his practices, the BON did not extend themselves to do this. Over a year later, his license was removed.

What to learn from this:

  1. there are NPs practicing with little training who will hurt people (there is someone who calls himself the elite NP who will even help NPs set up such practices. He has a video course on endocrinology that the NP can buy, and they offer advice on the business aspects. THey will help the NP find a supervisor who wont' bother them. His logo is a closeup of a $100 bill - just to give you the feel of the guy)
  2. Ethical NPs, RNs and Physicians are the only protection for patients, We can recognize this and take steps. Patients and other laypeople cannot.
  3. Doing the right thing, as Dr. Townsend did, can be hard. And exhausting. But, we know what the right thing to do is. I would be pretty sure Dr. Townsend saved some lives.
πŸ‘︎ 2k
πŸ“°︎ r/Residency
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/pshaffer
πŸ“…︎ Dec 28 2020
🚨︎ report
Is it more difficult to be accepted into physician assistant school than medical school? Here are the facts.

Before I begin, I want to emphasize, this post is not about the role of non-physicians in medical care or scope of practice. This is also not about who is smarter.

This post is simply about the frequently asserted claim, particularly on social media, that it is more difficult to be accepted into physician assistant school than medical school.

The data below is from MD applicants/matriculants from 2019-2020, DO applicants/matriculants from 2018-2019 (most recent report) and PA applicants/matriculants from 2019-2020 (as well as limited additional information from 2016-2017, see * below).

Acceptance Rate:

PA - 32.3%

  • Matriculants: 8,802
  • Applicants: 27,283
  • Programs: 238

DO - 35.3%

  • Matriculants: 7,415
  • Applicants: 20,981
  • Programs: 36

MD - 40.9%

  • Matriculants: 21,869
  • Applicants: 53,370
  • Programs: 155

GPA Science:

PA

  • Applicants: 3.27*
  • Matriculants: 3.52 SD 0.15

DO

  • Applicants: 3.36 SD 0.38
  • Matriculants: 3.49 SD 0.29

MD

  • Applicants: 3.48 SD 0.43
  • Matriculants: 3.66 SD 0.30

GPA Overall:

PA

  • Applicants: 3.36*
  • Matriculants: 3.58 SD 0.14

DO

  • Applicants: 3.46 SD 0.33
  • Matriculants: 3.56 SD 0.26

MD

  • Applicants: 3.58 SD 0.33
  • Matriculants: 3.73 SD 0.24

MCAT/GRE Percentile:

All medical schools require applicants to take the MCAT. The most commonly required test for PA school applicants is the GRE. The GRE is required by 57.7% of schools. The MCAT or GRE is required by 6.2%. Only the MCAT is required by 1.3%, with the SAT, ACT, CASPer composing the remaining required exams.

PA (GRE) - Applicants:

  • Verbal: 151.6 (~53rd percentile)*
  • Quantitative: 150.9 (~43rd percentile)*
  • Combined: 48th percentile*

PA (GRE) - Matriculants:

  • Verbal: 153 (59th percentile) SD 3.4
  • Quantitative: 153 (48th percentile) SD 3.2
  • Combined: ~54th percentile

DO (MCAT)

  • Applicants: 502 (56th percentile) SD 7.46
  • Matriculants: 504 (63rd percentile) SD 5.21

MD (MCAT)

  • Applicants: 506.1 (69th percentile) SD 9.3
  • Matriculants: 511.5 (85th percentile) SD 6.5

Discussion:

So, is it more difficult to be accepted into physician assistant school than medical school?

Technically, yes. Actually, no.

Yes, a smaller percentage of PA applicants are accepted. And, yes, it is true that PA matriculants have slightly better science and overall GPAs than DO matriculants. However, on a whole, the competitiveness of PA applicants is less than that of MD/DO applicants. MD matriculants have substantiall

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 252
πŸ“°︎ r/medicine
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/DrThirdOpinion
πŸ“…︎ Dec 30 2020
🚨︎ report

Please note that this site uses cookies to personalise content and adverts, to provide social media features, and to analyse web traffic. Click here for more information.