TIFU by not understanding baby shower gifts and giving my friends complex adult literature instead of baby books

This happened this weekend. I'm (35m) not exactly the kinda guy who gets invited to baby showers very often. But it seems like everyone I know has matured about 10 years in the past 1 pandemic year. So suddenly, friends are getting married and pregnant, and so on.

One such couple, I've known for close to 10 years, has a baby girl due in July. Awesome for them. They are both pretty scholarly folks, with degrees in English. One is an author and one is a copywriter for a brand.

So when their baby shower invite said "instead of a card, please bring a book so that whenever we read it, we'll think of you" I assumed it meant they wanted to grow their already extensive library (I mean I was also getting them a baby gift). So I bought them, what I felt was, a deeply moving novel.

As my partner and I are driving out to their place, she says, "I got them 'What tree am I' it's really cute and has pretty pictures. What book did you get them?"

Suddenly, a light goes off. I look at her blankly and ask, "You got them a kids book?"

She puts her hand over her mouth in disbelief. "Oh my god. Yes. It's a baby shower. You get them kids books. You know... for the baby. Why? What book did you get them?"

"Well, in my defense, 'The Bone Clocks' by David Mitchell is very captivating. And if you read it out loud in the right tone of voice, the baby probably won't even mind the horrific details about the Iraq war, genocide, murder, gender issues, or death cults."

Needless to say, it seemed a little out of place next to, "S is for Salmon", "Why do I love you", "Goodnight Moon", and "Irish Fairy Tales".

I was also reminded that a 600+ page novel may not be a priority for new parents. Whatever, mine had the best critic reviews on the back.

EDIT: I definitely wasn't expecting this big of a response, so a few updates:

I'm genuinely humbled by everyone's stories here. My TIFU is less that I gave this book and more that I feel I committed some unspoken social faux pas, in that the spirit of the event is about preparing the parents for the child's needs and I didn't pick up on that and instead gave them a gift of a book (thinking it was a direct substitute for a card). But hearing from a lot of people that this would actually be a welcome gift makes me comfortable that maybe the faux pas is superseded.

As for the response, I wrote below: *I think the ultimate conclusion will still play out for a bit. But the immediate conclusion was, my friends were appreciative of the thought

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Teacher claims that fantasy isn't "Literature"

Okay, so I'm a high-school student in the Netherlands. I got back into reading just a couple of months ago and I read a lot of fantasy in English (currently reading mistborn). A few days ago, I was interested in seeing if there are any fantasy classics from the Netherlands. So I looked up online, to see if there is some kind of "Dutch Tolkien". I couldn't find a lot, so I went and asked my Dutch Literature teacher if there is a fantasy genre in Dutch literature and if she knows of a "Dutch Tolkien". She told me bluntly that I shouldn't read fantasy and that she doesn't consider it to be "real literature". She basically thinks that Tolkien's books aren't "real literature".

That teacher is one of the biggest gatekeepers I know. She keeps rambling about how sad it is that kids don't read much anymore and then she literally claims that certain genres shouldn't be read. She's also one of those people who say that listening to audiobooks doesn't count as reading.

Well I'm just gonna keep reading my "not real literature" and my teacher can continue being an ignorant gatekeeper.

Edit: I wrote this post during my lunchbreak so I didn't have any time to respond to the comments since I was in class all this time. I'm going to discuss many of the points you guys brought up here with my teacher and I hope that I can convince her to perhaps change her views regarding fantasy.

I also didn't expect so many comments so my post isn't as nuanced as it probably should be. I wrote it right after asking her and this post became more of a rant than I intended. I don't actually think that the teacher is an idiot, but she is unfortunately very close minded.

Keep in mind that she teaches Dutch literature in high school. I see many comments of people in the Netherlands or Belgium who have had the same experience with Dutch literature teachers, so this might be some form of Dutch snobbery or maybe it just has to do with the fact that the fantasy genre is very uncommon in literature here, so she thinks that it's only for kids. Either way, I would've expected her to be less of a gatekeeper and more of a teacher.

To clarify about audiobooks: in Dutch schools you are required to choose a list 12 Dutch classic novels that you have to read in your 3 years of high school (if you do vwo). My teacher doesn't allow us to listen to any of these books on our list in audiobook format, because "it's not reading".

Another edit: wow this blew up and got way more upvotes and comments than I

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I’m a high school literature and composition teacher who is building a classroom library out of books that ARE NOT β€œchapter books,” and I need as many suggestions as possible. Specifics and examples inside.

tl;dr: What are your favorite weird, overly-specific, or breathtakingly beautiful β€œcoffee-table-esque” non-chapter books that I can add to my high school classroom library?

Hi, Reddit! I’m a public high school English teacher (16-18 year old students), and I’m trying to build a classroom library primarily out of books that aren’t chapter books.

I set aside one day every single school week where students can read for the entire period. They don’t have to journal about it, they don’t have to take a quiz about it, they don’t have to talk about it, and they can read whatever they want. No strings attached. The only rules are that they can’t sleep and they can’t be on their phones.

Now, I’m looking for books that are not chapter books because I have three types of students:

  1. Students who say, β€œI hate to read.” They really don’t. They just hate to read chapter books. My theory is that they don’t like to read chapter books because they never developed the endurance. My goal with these students isn’t to try to get them to read more, but rather to start saying, β€œI like reading, but I’m not really into chapter books.” I can actually get these students to read a ton once they stop thinking that I’m trying to trick them. If I have a classroom library full of options that aren’t chapter books, these students can explore a self-selected topic at their own pace, build up their β€œreading endurance,” and most importantly, they can begin to form positive feelings about reading.

  2. Students who like to read, but they’re swamped with honors and AP classes. These students really DO love to read, but they are so busy with their higher-level coursework that they’re not going to begin some chapter book that they just don’t have the time to finish, and a week between independent reading days is just too long for most of them to stay mentally involved in a story. By having a classroom of books that aren’t chapter books, these students get to read, and they get to satiate their curiosity, they get to develop a weird little knowledge base of trivia that will actually support them in their higher level coursework, and they don’t have to feel the frustration of beginning a book that they know they don’t have the time to finish.

  3. The book nerds. These students already have a book in their bag, and they already know which book they want to read next, and they’re on a first-name basis with the school librarian, so it doesn’t matter what I have in my classroom library.

So the

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Definitely has nothing at all to due with that particular piece of literature
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AI system trained on almost 40 years of the scientific literature correctly identified 19 out of 20 research papers that have had the greatest scientific impact on biotechnology – and has selected 50 recent papers it predicts will be among the β€˜top 5%’ of biotechnology papers in the future chemistryworld.com/news/a…
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Over a year ago I submitted my thesis on Witcher 3 to Harvard's History & Literature department. The picture on the top right is how I ended it. One of the proudest days of my life.
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He came in later and said I must not have studied literature. I'm not going to give him any more of my time, or tell him that I've written over twenty books. imgur.com/zvamOzx
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TIL that for many years prior to the Crusades, Muslims, Jews, and Christians worked together to translate and reproduce Ancient Greek texts, like Aristotle, to reintroduce lost literature to the world. jstor.org/stable/20101059…
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[[173]] Wants a Hug. My SCP themed children's book I made for my literature class's final. reddit.com/gallery/nkexek
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AI system trained on almost 40 years of the scientific literature correctly identified 19 out of 20 research papers that have had the greatest scientific impact on biotechnology – and has selected 50 recent papers it predicts will be among the β€˜top 5%’ of biotechnology papers in the future chemistryworld.com/news/a…
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Doki Doki Literature Club iceberg
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In The USSR, even during the height of Stalin's repression, they did not dare to censor or to suppress pre-revolutionary masterpieces of Russian poetry and literature. How much do we know about availability of classic Korean literature in North Korea?
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What literature are you aiming to be able to read in Japanese?

I'm just curious what your goals are in terms of reading books (native or international). Are there any particular series/novels that you have your eyes on?

For me I'd love to be able to read The Three Body Problem trilogy in Japanese eventually. I've read it in English and loved it. Although it can get pretty deep into the technical space jargon, which could be a challenge.

I've also read A Wild Sheep Chase (and an excerpt of Underground) by Murakami in English and I definitely want to read more of his work in general, but I guess I'm a little wary of my enjoyment of reading him in Japanese. I mean, his style is so distinct in the English translation (so thanks to the translator I guess) that I can't help but think how it might be like that in Japanese. Compounding this, I read a short non-fiction piece of his in Real Japanese Essays that was interesting from a storytelling/vocabulary perspective, but stylistically unremarkable, in my opinion (I think it was ηœŸγ£η™½γͺ嘘). Could just be that it was non-fiction though, so I definitely want to try to read a fiction novel of his in Japanese.

Edit: I love seeing all the contributions! I'm shocked. I've learned that there is a lot of literature I have not even broken the surface of. Also, I've learned that monogatari is a favorite far and away, so I'll have to look into that...

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In 2020 when traveling was banned I decided to replace it with reading a book from each country of the world. I mapped out the places that I have read already and started picking up literature from new places. Currently standing at 50 countries and looking forwards to more. public.tableau.com/profil…
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TIL the Draugr is an undead creature from Scandinavian saga literature and folktale. Living in their graves or royal palaces, often guarding treasure buried with them; they have magical abilities resembling those of living witches and wizards, such as shape-shifting and controlling the weather. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dra…
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Appreciating Pied Piper by BTS: By A Former (Slightly Clueless) Literature Student

Ah, Pied Piper. No other BTS song has ever made me feel so attacked and so seduced at the same time, and I know this holds true for everyone.

I decided to write this because of several conversations I have encountered of late surrounding this song which have made me realize that there's more to this song than just, well, sex. Though that's the main thing for me, personally. #priorities

But before I start, here's my disclaimer.

Disclaimer

  1. I don't know German or Korean and I haven't studied Goethe in my lit classes. I will give links to all the translations I have used but I do not know how authoritative they are. 2. Much of this is purely my interpretation, and I am for sure over-analyzing this song. Therefore, you're fully free to disagree with me and call me delulu (also do extend your own hot takes in the comments below, I'd love to read those).

BTS Being Pied Piper Enthusiasts (Song and Story)

Namjoon: In RM's Behind Vlive for LY:Her, RM says, "When I wrote the rap part to Pied Piper, we assigned a role to each member. My role was to express gratitude for our fans, but in a unique way, so I was a little worried...that it might offend some fans. [In letters from fans who are friends with his family], I have heard how they interpret meanings behind music videos, or their struggle to buy concert tickets. I wanted to express our gratitude in a unique way."

Here, RM is talking about BTS's gratitude towards the efforts that go into being an ARMY (more on this later).

j-hope: Precious Hobi! In a now legendary Vlive clip, when an ARMY says she's watching his live while she's in class, he says "sorry" and then sings a bit of Pied Piper at her! Here, j-hope is referring to the most commonly understood meaning behind the song β€” that it's a warning against procrastination and losing track of productivity because we're so wrapped up in Bangtan's dangerous charms.

Jimin: Jimin in his fairytale interview, mentions why he chose to play the Pied Piper in the photoshoot by answering a number of questions. "[Similarity to the personality of the Pied Piper] I'm very playful and I also like to help out but when I'm wronged, I don't just stand by either. [About interpreting the ending as a reader] When I was little I thought I really liked the ending, I thought the main character was very righteous and I was upset how he wasn't rewar

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When you're from the Southern Hemisphere, most directional and climate assumptions in literature are jarring

This is a niche topic of little importance. But in deference to a principle mooted by Bob Dylan: I have a lot of keyboards, and I gotta type somethin'. Or: "hey, this is a marginally-interesting thing most of you will not have ever HAD to consider". The topic title basically says it all, so if you're after brevity, you can go now; or, if you're a suitably-bored fantasy nerd like myself, read on:

Having finally got around to reading Steven Erikson's Karsa Orlong essay, it amused me to read the line:

>I wanted to address the fantasy trope of the β€˜barbarian’ (from the north, no less, and isn’t it curious how so many heroic barbarians come down from the north?).

Perhaps separate from Steven's primary point, but doubtless tangentially connected as some inflection of the "us"/"them" anthropological meme, of particular note was his parenthesesed comment about "the north".

In fantasy (and merely echoing most literature!), barbarians are "from the north", the ice fields are "in the north", the freezing wind comes "from the north", while "the south" is typically hot, arid, desert - etc. More often than not, such Northern Hemisphere of Earth -based assumptions are the underlying basis of entire fantasy world directional and climate settings, dictating everything from the placement of villages and houses, to the weather, the directions temperatures arrive from, the cultural expectations of where things like barbarians are supposed to come from (i.e. "the frozen north"!) - it's quite pervasive if you really drill down.

As a lifelong fantasy reader born and bred well into the Southern Hemisphere of our planet, such compass-point tropes - which, to the author, are passing familiar elements grounded in (for them, and for most readers by-way-of-population-density) Familiar Constants Of The Real World - are in (my) fact, quite "other".

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I couldn't find an iceberg related to lost literature (lost books, comics and plays) so I decided to make one
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What in rabbit literature education?
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In Victorian literature, was the dialogue embellished, or is that how they actually spoke?

I've been having a lot of trouble with this because no matter how hard I try, I can't picture the characters talking like...that. Take this quote from Helen Burns in Jane Eyre:

>Life appears to me too short to be spent in nursing animosity or registering wrongs. We are, and must be, one and all, burdened by faults in this world; but the time will soon come when, I trust, we shall put them off in putting off our corruptible bodies...I hold another creed, which no one ever taught me, and which I seldom mention, but in which I delight, and to which I cling; for it extends hope to all; it makes Eternity a restβ€”a mighty home, not a terror and an abyss.

Helen Burns is fourteen. FOURTEEN. Try to picture a 14 year old saying that. It just doesn't work. But take Tom Sawyer. It was published just about 29 years later, but with the exception of a bit of outdated slang, the characters could easily be from the present. And I read somewhere that Tom Sayer was one of the first popular books to use "vernacular speech". Does that mean that Jane Eyre used speech that was formalized in writing? Or did everyone speak formally? Help me out.

EDIT: Thank you so much for all the helpful answers. I've been puzzling over this one for a while, and it's really nice to have all these perspectives.

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PCM Classic Literature: The Odyssey
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My teacher (AP English Language) has tasked me with creating and running a dnd session for the 5 person class, in one period. It needs to be 1 hour long, none of them are familiar with the rules, and it needs to somehow be connected to literature/rhetoric. I have one month to prepare. Someone help?

I will be graded on this, and I am worried about a few things, as you can probably tell. I'm also probably screwed if my classmates don't get into it. I need ideas and suggestions on how I can run this (I have been dming for one year). Any help would be appreciated.

Edit: She said it should still be one hour but it can spill into two if need be

Edit 2: I’ll state for the record that I might be using an idea from the comments of a group that was hired by the Capulets to find out why Juliet keeps disappearing at night. Their trail will lead them to the Montegues, fight scene ensues, and carrying a tied up Juliet back to the Capulets. Crisis averted. I will be using this.

More ideas are still welcome, for me or anyone else who can be helped by this post. If I see anything better I will change my mind.

Edit 3: After reviewing some suggestions, I may end up not having stat sheets at all and just having d20s, or having just the main stats, and running a narrative driven session.

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If you were to teach a fantasy literature class, which titles would be on the reading list?

Going beyond the stories you love for their entertainment value... which books have consistent themes, life lessons, or go beyond simple storytelling by making us understand/question our lives today?

I've been scratching my head over this for some time now... I like a lot of fantasy, but honestly most of it is just purely for entertainment. Turn your brain off, sink into another world, and lose yourself among exotic locals and interesting characters.

The problem with this kind of literature is it doesn't have any lasting effect beyond the entertainment value. There's nothing to discuss of substance beyond what you liked about the book.

So for a fantasy literature class, which books would you put on a reading list which you would hope would effect your students in way beyond simple entertainment?

EDIT: Thank you for the response! I wasn't expecting so many people to make suggestions before i went to bed last night. I love to see all the different ideas people have.

It seems several people took offense over my comments about fantasy being primarily escapism... then they go on to suggest the same 3-5 authors. The point I was trying to make is not that ALL fantasy is escapism, but it is primarily that. Storytelling for the sake of entertainment. There's nothing wrong with that. It's a form of art. When I look at a painting the first thing that comes to mind is hownit makes me feel... not the deeper meaning of what the artist was trying to convey. I find fantasy to be the same way. I think people should take less offense at the term escapism...

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Happy 24th of May, Day of the holy brothers Cyril and Methodius, of the Bulgarian alphabet, education and culture and of Slavic literature!
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My final high school literature assignment
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Here's to sci fi literature fans
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Literature criticizing each quadrant.
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Prevalence of nonsensical algorithmically generated papers in the scientific literature doi.org/10.1002/asi.24495
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Absence of vital skeletal components. Roberts Syndrome is an extremely rare disorder. The first case of Roberts Syndrome was reported in 1919. So far only 17 cases have been reported. The Medical literature recognizes quite limited information about Roberts Syndrome. journal.medizzy.com/rober…
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"Just Walk it Off" A Discussion on Modern Pain and Injury Literature, RICE, and the Power of Expectation Regarding Pain and Injuries.

TLDR; RICE method is probably out dated. Your pain doesn't inherently mean that you're injured.

Intro

Hello all,

The purpose of this post is to prompt a discussion, and hopefully can cultivate interest in you, an athlete, coach, PT, enthusiast, or whatever - on some on the modern scientific literature when it comes to pain.

I'm keeping Rule 5 in Mind - this is not meant to be Medical Advice. This is not even meant to be advice. People have very strong opinions on pain and pain management. This is simply to spark some discussion and my personal viewpoints. I'm just a gym meathead who has dealt with a lot of injuries and pain through Rugby and powerlifting. I'm actually dealing with an ankle injury now that I'm in PT for.

What prompted this is when I watched Alan Thrall's 'I HURT MY BACK' video. It sort of opened my eyes in injury and pain management, and how much of it is truly just in our heads. I can't tell you how many times I really felt in pain during a Rugby match, but just "walking it off" helped tremendously. Meanwhile I had team mates who would get hurt, and it felt like the moment they decided they were injured, they truly were. But where is the line between being able to walk it off, and actually being injured and requiring significant rest? What is the truth?

1. The Power of Expectation | Pain is an Alarm - Not Harm

It has been well documented that the psychology and how we perceive pain are closely related. Take a child receiving a shot. When they know it's happening, they are in tears. They might even coddle their arm after the shot. But, when distracted, they don't even know anything happened at all. No tears, etc.

Similarly, my dad would always tell me in Rugby, "Don't let them know you're hurt" - meaning it can boost the opposing team's morale knowing that they hurt you. I can't tell you how many times I've wanted to take a knee, sub out, but jumped right back up and pretended I was ok. And just acting like I was toughening it out, I was. One or two rucks later and I was back at 100%. But, if I had subbed out, next thing I know I would be icing myself on the sideline, with people saying, "man, you really got hurt". And before you'd know it, I would be hurt, skipping practices, telling myself I was injured.

There similarly is a movement I've seen on Social Media against PTs, Chiros, even doctors that tell you to "protect your spine", that the spine is "fragile".

Take thi

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Ah, yes. Literature of the highest caliber.
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Reptile traffickers trawl scientific literature to target newly described species: rare species often appear for sale at trade websites fairs within months of being described by scientific journals news.mongabay.com/2021/05…
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What do you prioritize when looking for a place to live? What does the happiness literature say gives most people the best bang for their buck?

I've heard lots of conflicting accounts on, say, the positionality of your living space, that people report greater satisfaction with a tin roof in a thatched roof neighborhood than an underwater volcano castle in a neighborhood of nicer underwater volcano castles. I've also heard suggestions to prioritize commute times beyond what you'd expect -- though I'm not sure on the extent of non-linearities there, if going from 20m->10m commute increases your + juju by the same factor as going from 2h->1h would. Likewise, I've heard lotsa different rules of thumb for how much you should spend on housing (as a fraction of post-tax income, say, adjusting for local CoL, ranging from 1/4 to 1/2... but even there the fraction seems like it'd be income-dependent, since you might get more marginal value out of better housing, food, travel, toys, etc. at different income levels). Obviously there'd be tons of inter-individual variation in what housing qualities different people should prioritize, but I'm curious in both how the arithmetic plays out for the expected person (are there any good reviews), and also how all y'all personally decide on where to live?

Sorry if this is too askreddit-y for here, mods do please delete if so.

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πŸ“°︎ r/slatestarcodex
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πŸ‘€︎ u/--MCMC--
πŸ“…︎ May 23
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Why does majority of health literature for new moms and dads encourage being well rested and getting proper nutrition?

Like did you forget that we have a new baby? β€œGet sufficient rest” isn’t really applicable at this point πŸ˜‚ (as I stuff my face with PB filled pretzels because I haven’t been able to sit down at all today)

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πŸ“°︎ r/NewParents
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πŸ‘€︎ u/RA85373
πŸ“…︎ May 08
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Literature professors know
πŸ‘︎ 1k
πŸ“°︎ r/Professors
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πŸ‘€︎ u/discountheat
πŸ“…︎ Apr 26
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β€œHave you thought about joining the Literature Club?”
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πŸ“°︎ r/DDLC
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Friccin_Druggo
πŸ“…︎ May 24
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Is it worth it getting a degree in English literature?

[I posted this on r/askuk and it got deleted lol, I was told to post here instead, so this is a copy and paste from there]

Is it worth it getting a degree in English literature?

Basically the title. I’m 17 in my first year of sixth form so there has been a lot of talk in school about what we’re doing in uni if we decided to go. Basically what I really want to do is fashion but I’m not sure if it’s realistic and my family isn’t supportive. The only other thing I’m really interested in is English lit but everyone says it’s a useless degree.

For context, I’m studying Textiles, English lit and business where I’m expected to get AAA minimum. I also got one grade 6, four 7s, two 8s and one 9 for GCSE.

Also another reason I’m asking is because I don’t want to be a teacher. I’m not actually sure what I want to do with my life, but I’m thinking somewhere in marketing or some form of writing, which I know is achievable with a literature degree but I’m still not sure if it’s worth it.

Thanks 😊

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πŸ“°︎ r/UniUK
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Honeybee0109
πŸ“…︎ May 13
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What is a clichΓ© in horror literature that you just hate?

Aspiring horror author here. I want to know what the community thinks has been done to death. Thanks.

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πŸ“°︎ r/horrorlit
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πŸ‘€︎ u/lone_ichabod
πŸ“…︎ May 25
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Spanish police raid factory making 3D-printed weapons - There were also manuals on terrorism, urban guerilla warfare and how to make explosives at home using a 3D printer, as well as white supremacist literature and a pistol holster with the symbol of the German army during the Second World War. reuters.com/world/europe/…
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πŸ“°︎ r/Futurology
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Gari_305
πŸ“…︎ Apr 19
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Where did the Bible writers concept of "Nephilim" come from? Were there more ancient sources that talked about angels intermingling with human women? Or is the story original to Biblical literature? Did the concept evolve over time?
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πŸ“°︎ r/AcademicBiblical
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Wild_Ingenuity979
πŸ“…︎ May 21
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Both being from literature clubs 🀝
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πŸ“°︎ r/hyouka
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Oceanbreez_
πŸ“…︎ Jun 01
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Best literature to come out of the USSR

I’ve recently become a fan of Stainslaw Lem (read Solaris and Star Diaries, can’t wait to get to Cyberiad).

Just curious what other big Dick writers came out of the USSR.

Feel free to list movies also if that’s more your thing.

Edit: I meant the Eastern Bloc countries in general. Sorry for any initial confusion.

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πŸ“°︎ r/stupidpol
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Sleep_Useful
πŸ“…︎ May 28
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Not Your Average Literature Club: Meet the Heavy Parody reddit.com/gallery/no3lmy
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πŸ“°︎ r/DDLC
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Donic_Vople
πŸ“…︎ May 30
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LOTR and the Tropes of Apocalyptic Literature

The last few days have seen a couple posts discussing and arguing the apocalyptic nature of The Lord of the Rings. I figured I would throw in my two cents. I am a huge Tolkien/LOTR fan but I do not claim to be an expert on the history of Middle-earth. That being said, I am an avid reader with a Master’s degree in English Literature. This does not mean my opinion holds any more weight than anyone here, only that I am (humbly) a good reader, capable of recognizing tropes, tone, theme, plot devices, etc. in a wide range of written works, including LOTR.

The following are a few of my notes quickly taken during a Bible as Literature graduate course. The notes are largely un-revised and the target audience is my professor/colleagues/classmates who are generally more educated about the Bible as Literature than this audience here on Reddit but less educated on Lord of the Rings, Middle-earth, and Tolkien in general. As a result, there will be explanations of Middle-earth that you will not need (and are over-simplified) and unfortunately there will be explanations and definitions of apocalyptic literature that you will need but that will not be provided. (To be honest, I just don’t feel like revising my notes for this audience or writing a full length paper at the moment lol)

The following is not meant to be read as the final or only take on Lord of the Rings as apocalyptic literature, nor do I claim to have everything about Middle-earth correct. I am only trying to contribute to the current ongoing conversation about LOTR being read as apocalyptic. This is only my opinion and a quick look at how Tolkien works with the tropes of apocalyptic literature.

I do see the events, characters, and themes of Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings working within the genre and tropes of apocalyptic literature. In modernity, there are a lot of fast and loose definitions of what we might consider β€œapocalyptic.” Even the word β€œapocalypse” has taken on an association with death and destruction but the original Greek meaning of the word is a lot closer to the definition of revelation, or to reveal and uncover. For the purposes of these notes, I will be using the five defining tropes of apocalyptic literature outlined by David Barr in his The Dawn of A New Day. Barr is specifically writing about how works like the Biblical book of Revelation use many of the common tropes of apocalyptic literature. The book of Revelation and its tropes are a good definition of apocalyptic lit

... keep reading on reddit ➑

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πŸ“°︎ r/tolkienfans
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πŸ‘€︎ u/kb_92
πŸ“…︎ May 25
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Doki Doki Literature Club iceberg
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πŸ“°︎ r/IcebergCharts
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πŸ“…︎ Apr 26
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We've spent the past few weeks creating a comprehensive course / guide to studying Japanese through Anime, Dramas, Literature and other forms of Japanese media.

This is effectively still a work in progress and there may be minor changes over the coming weeks, but we're interested as to what you think of it so far and feedback is greatly appreciated. You can view the site at https://learnjapanese.neocities.org

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πŸ“°︎ r/LearnJapanese
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πŸ‘€︎ u/ICadmin
πŸ“…︎ May 08
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Shots fired: Teacher claims that fantasy isn't "Literature" old.reddit.com/r/books/co…
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πŸ“°︎ r/bookscirclejerk
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πŸ‘€︎ u/HypnagogicPope
πŸ“…︎ Apr 29
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I’m a high school literature and composition teacher who is building a classroom library out of books that ARE NOT β€œchapter books,” and I need as many suggestions as possible. Specifics and examples inside.

tl;dr: What are your favorite weird, overly-specific, or breathtakingly beautiful β€œcoffee-table-esque” non-chapter books that I can add to my high school classroom library?

Hi, Reddit! I’m a public high school English teacher (16-18 year old students), and I’m trying to build a classroom library primarily out of books that aren’t chapter books.

I set aside one day every single school week where students can read for the entire period. They don’t have to journal about it, they don’t have to take a quiz about it, they don’t have to talk about it, and they can read whatever they want. No strings attached. The only rules are that they can’t sleep and they can’t be on their phones.

Now, I’m looking for books that are not chapter books because I have three types of students:

  1. Students who say, β€œI hate to read.” They really don’t. They just hate to read chapter books. My theory is that they don’t like to read chapter books because they never developed the endurance. My goal with these students isn’t to try to get them to read more, but rather to start saying, β€œI like reading, but I’m not really into chapter books.” I can actually get these students to read a ton once they stop thinking that I’m trying to trick them. If I have a classroom library full of options that aren’t chapter books, these students can explore a self-selected topic at their own pace, build up their β€œreading endurance,” and most importantly, they can begin to form positive feelings about reading.

  2. Students who like to read, but they’re swamped with honors and AP classes. These students really DO love to read, but they are so busy with their higher-level coursework that they’re not going to begin some chapter book that they just don’t have the time to finish, and a week between independent reading days is just too long for most of them to stay mentally involved in a story. By having a classroom of books that aren’t chapter books, these students get to read, and they get to satiate their curiosity, they get to develop a weird little knowledge base of trivia that will actually support them in their higher level coursework, and they don’t have to feel the frustration of beginning a book that they know they don’t have the time to finish.

  3. The book nerds. These students already have a book in their bag, and they already know which book they want to read next, and they’re on a first-name basis with the school librarian, so it doesn’t matter what I have in my classroom library.

So the

... keep reading on reddit ➑

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πŸ“°︎ r/booksuggestions
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Saint_Dichotomy
πŸ“…︎ Jun 02
🚨︎ report
I’m a high school literature and composition teacher who is building a classroom library out of books that ARE NOT β€œchapter books,” and I need as many suggestions as possible. Specifics and examples inside.

tl;dr: What are your favorite weird, overly-specific, or breathtakingly beautiful β€œcoffee-table-esque” non-chapter books that I can add to my high school classroom library?

Hi, Reddit! I’m a public high school English teacher (16-18 year old students), and I’m trying to build a classroom library primarily out of books that aren’t chapter books.

I set aside one day every single school week where students can read for the entire period. They don’t have to journal about it, they don’t have to take a quiz about it, they don’t have to talk about it, and they can read whatever they want. No strings attached. The only rules are that they can’t sleep and they can’t be on their phones.

Now, I’m looking for books that are not chapter books because I have three types of students:

  1. Students who say, β€œI hate to read.” They really don’t. They just hate to read chapter books. My theory is that they don’t like to read chapter books because they never developed the endurance. My goal with these students isn’t to try to get them to read more, but rather to start saying, β€œI like reading, but I’m not really into chapter books.” I can actually get these students to read a ton once they stop thinking that I’m trying to trick them. If I have a classroom library full of options that aren’t chapter books, these students can explore a self-selected topic at their own pace, build up their β€œreading endurance,” and most importantly, they can begin to form positive feelings about reading.

  2. Students who like to read, but they’re swamped with honors and AP classes. These students really DO love to read, but they are so busy with their higher-level coursework that they’re not going to begin some chapter book that they just don’t have the time to finish, and a week between independent reading days is just too long for most of them to stay mentally involved in a story. By having a classroom of books that aren’t chapter books, these students get to read, and they get to satiate their curiosity, they get to develop a weird little knowledge base of trivia that will actually support them in their higher level coursework, and they don’t have to feel the frustration of beginning a book that they know they don’t have the time to finish.

  3. The book nerds. These students already have a book in their bag, and they already know which book they want to read next, and they’re on a first-name basis with the school librarian, so it doesn’t matter what I have in my classroom library.

So the

... keep reading on reddit ➑

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πŸ“°︎ r/WeirdLit
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Saint_Dichotomy
πŸ“…︎ Jun 02
🚨︎ report

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