Have you ever thought that most Vampires that are over 200 and live in America where probably involved in the Indigenous Genocide/Slave Trade Of Native Americans and Black people.

Especially the Ventrue and other “high clans” one of my Ventrue characters gets kind of uncomfortable at the local Clan meetings when his Elders bring up how they massacred A Village of Indigenous People and ripped babies Out of their mother's wombs. But it's not like the “Low clans” would tale part of it. In my Vampire story I show how casual and normalized White Supremacy, Slavery, and Ethnic cleansing where. By having a Semi-friendly NPC casual mentions how they Scalped Indians for money.

Slavery seems like a great way to have a herd that no one questions if they expire. Kind of like how its seen in Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter where the Vampires control the confederacy for a supply of Juicey blood bags. One of My Ventrue NPC sores was a slave trader that raped his slaves and sold his female mulatto and Quadron offspring at a premium price as “Fancy Girls” and whose feeding restriction is Mixed race Women. I plan to have one of my main characters sire or a NPC's Biological father be him, (they do not like their father by the way and he was embraced because he was a light-skinned black man and his black Kindred sire thought that both Kine and Kindred society would respect a lighter-skinned black person more then a “darkie” like him. And that's another allied PC Along with the “Fancy Girl” seller. The Ventrue PC has a connection to the Rapist and he feels conflicted between his Clan loyalty and his Coteries plans.

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📅︎ Feb 06 2021
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Current distribution of the indigenous peoples of the Americas (not including mestizos) reddit.com/gallery/lol9p1
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📰︎ r/MapPorn
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👤︎ u/Mousa_m3
📅︎ Feb 21 2021
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The indigenous people of north and central america were more advanced than the europeans in a ton of ways and thats a fact
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📅︎ Mar 04 2021
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a flag for the indigenous peoples of north america
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📅︎ Dec 11 2020
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A flag for the Indigenous peoples of North America concept
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👤︎ u/BMXTKD
📅︎ Dec 11 2020
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I wish the Indigenous people of the Americas had never been contacted
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📅︎ Mar 07 2021
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Remember that one time when it was doctrine that indigenous people of the americas were descendants of Lehi?

https://youtu.be/vOvdmhhVJZE

For additional fun, read the comments!

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📰︎ r/exmormon
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👤︎ u/colbiz
📅︎ Dec 31 2020
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In North America, the indigenous people of the Great Plains became master horsemen not too long after it was introduced, did anything similar happen with the natives of the South American grasslands such as the the Pampas?

I don't know much about the Native peoples of the Southern cone, but I have heard that the Mapuche people in Chile were (are?) considered skilled horse riders, did anything like this happen with people over the rest of the grasslands and plains in South America? Was there as dramatic a change in society and warfare as the introduction of the horse caused in North America?

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👤︎ u/Khwarezm
📅︎ Feb 24 2021
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How did the introduction of horses and different metallurgy techniques affect the day to day lives of indigenous peoples in the Americas who had direct contact with the colonizers?
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👤︎ u/Tlaloc74
📅︎ Feb 10 2021
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Some estimates have Afro-Asiatic being as old as 18,000 years old. Since the indigenous people of the Americas are thought to descend from a single population about 15,000 years ago, why does there seem to be so little evidence of an 'Amerind' language family?

Apart from the n/m pronouns in many Amerind languages, it doesn't seem like there's much evidence connecting native American languages across the continent.

But presumably, if the native population descends from a common group that expanded ~15k years ago, then the native languages probably descend from one or a few common languages as well. And if Afro-Asiatic can still be identified after 18k years (although I admit that's the high end of the estimates), isn't is surprising that in the Americas we're left with hundreds of different families.

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📅︎ Dec 03 2020
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Native American Myths: Captivating Myths and Legends of Cherooke Mythology, the Choctaws and Other Indigenous Peoples from North America amazon.com/Native-America…
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📰︎ r/FreeEBOOKS
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📅︎ Dec 12 2020
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Scientists were—for the very first time—able to trace the dramatic migration of different ancient Siberian peoples — individuals who share DNA with living Inuits and Native Americans. They also found shared DNA between Khaiyrgas-1 and indigenous people in North America, such as the Chane and Guarani inverse.com/science/ancie…
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📰︎ r/science
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👤︎ u/rustoo
📅︎ Jan 07 2021
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How did the Spanish missionaries converted the indigenous people of Latin America?

How did the Spanish missionaries managed to spread and explained Catholicism to Amerindians?

Did they knew how to speak their language?

If so how did they learn the language of the Amerindians?

Most of their language didn't even had a script

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📅︎ Jan 03 2021
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What Kind of Hospitality Was Practiced By The Indigenous Peoples of North America & Greenland Pre-Contact?

You know, if a hunter gets lost and stumbles onto a neighboring settlement and it's too late to go home, or if a distant relative shows up for a visit or something. Were there any specific customs for how guests should be treated (and behave themselves)?

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👤︎ u/Zeuvembie
📅︎ Jan 15 2021
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Happy Indigenous People's day from the States! Here's a list of indigenous metal bands across the Americas, Oceania, and the Pacific: /r/IndigenousMetal/commen…
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📰︎ r/folkmetal
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👤︎ u/calamityko
📅︎ Oct 12 2020
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Genocide versus Genocides: What is the comparative utility of approaching what was done to the indigenous peoples of the Americas from 1492 onwards as a genocide, in the singular, versus many smaller campaigns of genocide? Are they even in opposition are are they complementary ways to understand it?

I think at this point it is safe to say most historians are comfortable using the 'G' word to describe post-1492, and even popular understanding is finally moving in that direction. But something I have seen is debate and discussion as to whether it is better to describe is as one, ongoing genocide, or better to talk about there being many different genocides.

Not being plugged into the issue enough, I can see utility in both, and possibly even they are more complementary frameworks rather than opposing ones, but you know what they say about assumptions.

So the sum of it is that I would certainly be interested in better understanding what this discussion looks like, the direction it is going, and what we can learn from the different approaches, both in the academy, but also within indigenous communities and how they specifically use the concepts to approach their own history.

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📅︎ Oct 12 2020
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The Magellanic Clouds are tied to the cultural lore of many Indigenous peoples in South America, Australia, and southern Africa, where they represent feathers of rheas (an ostrich relative); tracks of celestial animals (Setlhako); a pair of cranes (Prolggi); and an old couple by a campfire (Jukara). astronomy.com/magazine/ne…
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📰︎ r/space
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👤︎ u/clayt6
📅︎ Nov 20 2020
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Map of indigenous peoples in North America at the time of first contact with Europeans, found in my history textbook
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📰︎ r/MapPorn
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📅︎ Sep 11 2020
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What if the indigenous peoples of the Americas had been immune to smallpox?

The death of 90-95% of the indigenous population of the Americas is attributed to Old World diseases, mainly smallpox. Many of those that survived were greatly weakened, with large numbers left blind by the effects of the disease. The mass deaths and the political and social instability brought by the smallpox epidemic left the native peoples extremely vulnerable to conquest by the Europeans.

What if this had never occurred, and somehow the indigenous population had been largely immune to the disease? I'm not sure how, but maybe let's say the Viking settlers of Vinland had carried cowpox and passed it to a group of indigenous people, it had spread through the Americas around 1000AD, and a significant proportion of the indigenous population may have had a greater degree of immunity to smallpox by the time Columbus arrived. but to avoid complicating things let's just say by some fluke or divine intervention or something, smallpox just hadn't been an issue.

Would the Europeans have been able to wipe out the natives with such brutal efficiency if the natives had not been already so devastated by smallpox? Would colonial nations such as the United States and Brazil exist alongside the Aztec and Inca empires, the Cherokee, the Iroquois, the Creek to this day?

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👤︎ u/protodro
📅︎ Aug 20 2020
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TIL that Turtle Island is a name for North America used by some Indigenous and First Nations people and by some Indigenous rights activists, based on the Iroquois belief that the earth is supported on the back of a gigantic turtle called Hah-nu-nah en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tur…
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👤︎ u/benjaneson
📅︎ Aug 02 2020
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Looking for a documentary about the colonisation of America from indigenous people's perspective.

If you know of anything good, ideally that is on Netflix or YouTube or Prime, I'll be happy!

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📅︎ Oct 13 2020
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The Willamette Meteorite is an iron-nickel meteorite found in Oregan, US. Weighing 14,150 kg, it is the largest meteorite found in North America & the 6th largest in the world. It is held sacred by the indigenous people of Willamette Valley. Credit: @rainmaker1973 on IG
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📅︎ Nov 20 2020
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Apropos Indigenous Peoples Day, why was the genocide of indigenous peoples in North America so much more complete than that in Central and Southern America?

The majority Latinx populations of many Central and South American countries are still the descendants of indigenous peoples (intermixed with Europeans and Africans, obviously), whereas the Native Americans of the now-United States are a small fraction of the population. Is this discrepancy due to more overtly genocidal policies by North American colonizers as compared to more willingness to interbreed in Central and South America? Were the populations of North America much more vulnerable to European diseases? Or is some part of my question fundamentally incorrect?

Thank you!

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👤︎ u/ellimist76
📅︎ Oct 14 2020
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Various writers who write from or sympathize with perspective(s) of indigenous people in America and abroad have suggested that the political structure of the Iroquois confederacy had a consequential influence on the Federal structure of the US Constitution. Is there evidence to affirm this idea ?
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👤︎ u/snoopus
📅︎ Sep 24 2020
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Were native north americans knew of the indigenous people of south america?

I been searching this for a while now and there's almost nothing from were I could get a concrete answer, I know that there's lot of cultures but almost all of them have a foundation and things in common.

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👤︎ u/Bowsar4
📅︎ Nov 11 2020
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What if the indigenous people of North America were Vikings?

The Vikings discovered North America and there were no native people, so they decided to stay. Over the next five hundred years they were forgotten about by the rest of Europe and spread over two continents, and used their Viking longships to colonize the Caribbean, then Christopher Columbus sailed across the ocean blue in 1492. Landed on and island and encountered some native Vikings who speak Norse and worship the Norse gods. How does Columbus and his crew react to this? Do they try to convert the Vikings to Christianity do they kidnap some of them and try to bring them back to Europe as slaves? What do the Vikings do? Do they attack?

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👤︎ u/tomkalbfus
📅︎ Aug 22 2020
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There’s a 350-Foot Statue of Columbus in Puerto Rico. Indigenous People Want It Gone. It’s the tallest sculpture in North America, and locals say it’s “an embarrassment.” motherjones.com/politics/…
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👤︎ u/Pulelehua
📅︎ Oct 10 2020
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Facing Fire (2019) - Despite billions of dollars spent fighting wildfires in North America, their scale and impacts grow each year. Yet in the past, indigenous people had managed the land for centuries with prescribed fire burns. Explore how we can manage our fire-prone landscapes.[00:21:39] youtube.com/watch?v=Qo98m…
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👤︎ u/karroty
📅︎ Sep 09 2020
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I've been gone for a minute but now I'm back with the jump-off! This episode of The Breeze Podcast delves deep into the history of Indigenous people in America. Genocide, war, and disease plagued Native American communities and the American government promoted all of it. findthebreeze.com/the-bre…
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📰︎ r/lgbt
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📅︎ Oct 23 2020
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Did any of the indigenous people of the Americas have theatre?

Did any of the indigenous peoples of the Americas have actors who played characters or theatre as it would be recognised in Europe pre-contact? If so, do we know who was the equivalent of Thespis in their cultures?

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📰︎ r/history
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👤︎ u/Xerxster
📅︎ Sep 22 2020
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In their own voices, First Nations Indigenous People will discuss the destructiveness of the Doctrine of Discovery on their peoples in what is presently known as the Americas and the Caribbean. youtube.com/watch?v=SoVLK…
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📰︎ r/Protestant
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📅︎ Oct 13 2020
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How did Indigenous American peoples respond to the introduction of house cats to the Americas during the Columbian exchange?

I know that domesticated dogs played important roles in many American societies as working animals, food sources, and companions since time immemorial. But it's my understanding that domestic cats originated in Afro-Eurasia much more recently and, as such, weren't present in the Americas until the Columbian exchange.

Shortly after house cats arrived in the Americas, how did various Indigenous peoples incorporate (or resist incorporating) these animals into their worldviews and daily practices? For instance, did the Andean peoples who incorporated pumas as potent cultural symbols connect fearsome pumas to the newly introduced little felines?

How might these effects have differed among Nations with very different lifeways in different parts of the continents? Did cats ever start to make an appearance in Indigenous American histories, music, folklore, humor, or religion? And, not to get too contemporary on this sub, are there any significant twentieth-century Native relationships with domestic cats that give us insight into recent Indigenous experiences?

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📅︎ Aug 24 2020
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What more can I be doing as a non-indigenous man to keep the needs of the indigenous American people as a part of the dialogue in today’s “ever changing” America?

TL;DR: I’m a white guy, and I live in a very political city without a large openly indigenous presence. What can I do to keep your goals as a part of the modern discussion about civil and human rights? I would appreciate if people could list concerns and personal values in the comments.

Hey all, white guy here.

Since I was a kid, I’ve been deeply interested in hearing the stories and lives of indigenous cultures from the cultures themselves. Most traditional school systems just teach things that are flat out problematic. I’ve been to local museums in Plymouth, Connecticut, Southern Florida, and Alaska as well, hoping to learn as much as I can. I also talk to indigenous people whenever someone is willing to openly discuss their culture. I learned a lot about the reservation system on a mission trip from a girl who is a member of the Hopi Nation, and on vacation in Alaska, my family was privileged enough to meet a woman with Haida ancestry who gave us a tour (not organized) around Ketchikan and told us about her life, experience, the story of colonists arriving in Alaska, and the prejudice they brought with them. I’ve also attended a national day of mourning protest, and an inter-tribal powwow in Upstate New York, albeit one that was very liberal and white friendly.

Here’s where things get tricky. I go to school in New York City, and while there are more than a few people who are genetically part Native American, a lot people buy into the colonial racial groupings, and choose to not get involved in the situation at hand. The only person I’ve spoken to who actually was involved enough in her nation’s culture to teach me anything was one of the people working tech for one of our productions (I’m in theatre school). She was of Mi’kmaq heritage, and she taught me that the first western theater in North America was built by the Mi’kmaq and French colonists. She also taught me about how bad Canada actually is to their indigenous people, even though Americans love to glorify Canada for being “perfect.”

Most of the other people I’ve met in NYC aren’t as much of a part of any solution as anyone I’ve met in other parts of the Americas. One student who I’ve been friends with since freshman year is a member of the Seneca tribe. He’s 1/16, and gets a scholarship for it, but other than that, he doesn’t really know much about Seneca history. There’s another girl in our program who acts as a gatekeeper for native culture, claiming that she’s “anywhere from 50%-

... keep reading on reddit ➡

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📅︎ Jun 30 2020
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@SmithsonianMag: Indigenous Peoples’ Day recognizes that Native people are the first inhabitants of the Americas, including the lands that later became the United States of America. https://t.co/ECtnkYLhbk mobile.twitter.com/Smiths…
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📰︎ r/newsbotbot
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👤︎ u/-en-
📅︎ Oct 12 2020
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TIL in 1763, King George III issued a royal proclamation that forbade British settlement in North America west of the Appalachians, reserving the land for indigenous peoples. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy…
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👤︎ u/CC_trading
📅︎ Oct 07 2020
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The indigenous city of Cahokia, across the river from St. Louis, is thought have had at most 40,000 people living there. Cahokia was large enough to have suburbs and had an equal pop. to London in the 1200s. No city would have surpassed it's pop. in north America until Philadelphia in the 1780s en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/C…
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📅︎ Jun 08 2020
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TIL in 1763, King George III issued a royal proclamation that forbade British settlement in North America west of the Appalachians, reserving the land for indigenous peoples. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy…
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📅︎ Oct 07 2020
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