Any Los Angeles County street name origins/etymologies that you're curious about?

I'm researching the origins of street names across Los Angeles County. Three months ago I posted a similar question here and got a ton of great responses. (At the time, I'd written about the origins of 400 streets in the county. I'm now up to 600!) I found it very useful to see what streets people wanted to know about. So I thought I'd ask again. Any street in any city in L.A. County is fair game. If I already know its etymology or history, I'll reply below. If not, I'll add it to my to-do list. And if you have any "insider" information, e.g., there's a street named for an ancestor of yours, I'd love to know about it. Thanks!

EDIT: This really blew up. Thank you so much for all the suggestions and insights. I've tried to reply to as many as I can, but I just can't keep up anymore!

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Etymology of South Africa
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PSA: Don't google the etymology of pencil in front of 7th graders

I teach French. My students always ask "why is pencil "crayon" in French?" I usually respond with "why is it pencil in English?" or something to that effect.

Today I decided I'd look it up, so I searched "pencil etymology" on google on my projector screen. Turns out it comes from the Latin "penis" which meant "tail." Closed that tab REAL quick...only a few kids saw, but word travels fast. Now pencils are penises, but hey, at least that helps them remember crayon is masculine in French.

Edit: all the people who just came to this thread to tell me I should've stopped my class to explain the etymology of penis to a bunch of 12 year olds... I'm glad I'm the teacher and you're not lol

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Albania, in several languages and its etymologies OC
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Etymology for chess in European languages
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Etymology map of color red
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A quick look into the etymology of the name Evan and how it might be connected to FNAF if BV's name is Evan indeed.

So with the recent discovery of the name โ€˜Evanโ€™ in the Foxy grid in the Logbook, which might be a potential confirmation that BVโ€™s name is Evan (like it is speculated to be implied in Blackbird) I decided to look deeper into the etymology of this name, in case it might add some important info.

Iโ€™ve looked it up on two resources:

From Wikipedia:

"Evan is a Welsh masculine given name derived from "Iefan", a Welsh form for the name John. The name John itself is derived from the ancient Hebrew name ื™ึฐื”ึนื•ื—ึธื ึธืŸ โ€œYษ™hรดแธฅฤnฤnโ€, which means "God is gracious".

(Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evan#:~:text=Evan%20is%20a%20Welsh%20masculine,form%20for%20the%20name%20John.&text=Other%20languages%20also%20assign%20meaning,right%2Dhanded%22%20in%20Scots.)

From etymonline.com:

"Evan - masculine proper name, Welsh form of John, perhaps influenced in form by Welsh ieuanc "young man".

(Link: https://www.etymonline.com/word/Evan#etymonline_v_11698).

As you can see, the first resource suggests that the name Evan can be translated as "God is gracious". If Evan=BV=Aftonโ€™s youngest son, it would actually be logical for him to be named this way, and here is why I think so.

We already know for sure that William Afton had at least two older children, Michael and Elizabeth. The name โ€˜Michaelโ€™ literally means โ€˜Who is/looks like Godโ€™; and we know that Michael resembles William in terms of appearance. Michael even says himself: "They thought I was you" about the SL animatronics mistaking him for his father.

And the name โ€˜Elizabethโ€™ literally means โ€˜God is my oathโ€™; and we know as well that Elizabeth was very devoted to William, both in books and the games, as she says in FFPS: "Iโ€™ll make you proud, daddy!".

Knowing how William is a narcissist and is obviously having a God complex, it would be logical for him to choose, at least subconsciously, a 'god-themed' pattern of names for his children, because he most likely saw himself as a 'deity' of sorts and was expecting his own children to perceive him as such.

Of course, if BV=Evan=Aftonโ€™s third kid, we still donโ€™t know for sure what kind of relationship they actually had, and whether BV had any reason to see his father as โ€˜graciousโ€™. Unless he was so naรฏve that he only saw his brother and the creepy animatronics as bad guys and didn't suspect William to be evil.

Also, as you can see from both quotes, Evan is also a variant of the name John.

No, Iโ€™m not saying that Evan/BV=John from the novels; no-no-no.

I just

... keep reading on reddit โžก

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Etymology goes brrr
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What is the etymology of Togrutas?

George Lucas has always loved his world building--so much so that two trilogies of films would never be enough. While Star Wars does at time just like the sound of a name, it can also be rather Tolkien.

Like, we're pretty sure that Jedi spawned from the Japanese word ๆ™‚ไปฃๅŠ‡ (jidaigeki), meaning period drama--typically Edo Japan.

There's also that time he changed Korriban to Moraband because it "sounded better". Properly invoking moribund-a dying thing or person.

Then there's Mustafar literally meaning Chosen One.

Anyone who's first name's Darth.

And I seem to remember reading somewhere that Anakin might have spawned from the Hebrew word Anakim, a race of giants in Old Testament.

But I simply cannot find anything on Togruta--not a hint. Is there a database or such with the names of things and their meaning?

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Etymology of the surname "Smith" in different European languages
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Etymology of every Portuguese district
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Netflix created a series โ€œHistory of Swear Wordsโ€ that uses actual linguists to describe etymology and definitions, neurological effects :D netflix.com/title/8130575โ€ฆ
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Etymology of "orgasm"

I was told that orgasm is a contraction of the words "organism" and "spasm", but after some research i could conclude that this is seemingly incorrect. I could trace one part of the word back to "แฝ€ฯฮณฮฎ" (orgแธ—) from ancient greek, but i was wondering is what the "-ฯƒฮผฯŒฯ‚" (-smรณs) suffix means

tl;dr: What is the actual origin of the word "orgasm"

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I made an infographic about the etymology of command-line tools. Hope you find it interesting :)
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Etymology map of "Hotel"
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Don't trigger me with etymology, Amazon
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Any thoughts about Emhyr var Emreis' real life etymology?

Just hit me while wasting time is that "Emhyr" is much similar to Turkish word "emir" which has its roots from Arabic word "amir", both have the meaning of "commander in charge."

Also, his surname includes "reis" which is also used in Turkish for "chief" or "chairman".

Considering Emhyr's character, I think these can be related. Sapkowski likes picking distant words like "Demawend". What do you think?

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An infographic of the etymology of command-line tools
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Etymology of Cities in Atlantic Europe
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Congress ends the opening prayer with "amen and awoman" leading to many blank stares. Twitter users (including a senator) offer their hot takes. But one thing is for certain: no one can take 5 seconds to check the wikipedia article to find the actual etymology of the word. twitter.com/BobStone3/staโ€ฆ
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Where would one begin if they wished to study etymology in their spare time?

I have a deep interest in words but until recently I had no idea what word roots were (embarrassing, but I was never taught in school). Now I want expand my academic and general vocabulary and understand that studying etymology would be helpful in attaining this goal.

I wonder if there are any texts in particular that would help in grasping some the basic principles. I also wonder what other base knowledge would be helpful for someone getting started.

Many thanks, a keen learner.

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Some Mr Nothing etymology things from ไนŒๆœ‰ๅ…ˆ็”ŸๅŽ†้™ฉ่ฎฐ

New Skade man is also a literature reference like his brother, Phantom.

Some Mr Nothing etymology things thanks to Weibo:

-ไนŒๆœ‰ๅ…ˆ็”Ÿ is a Chinese phrase that means 'a person or thing that does not exist or is fictional'. ๅ…ˆ็”Ÿ is Mr in Chinese, so he is Mr Nothing in EN. This originates from ๅญ่™š่ต‹.

When Mr Nothing activates his skill, the words ๅญ่™šไนŒๆœ‰ written in Chinese calligraphy appears. Which makes the nod to the ๅญ่™š่ต‹ text clearer.

In here, Mr Nothing criticises the way an official of Chu talks in front of the king of Qi.

-ไนŒๆœ‰ๅ…ˆ็”ŸๅŽ†้™ฉ่ฎฐ (The Adventures of Mr Nothing) is a piece of Chinese literature which is read as high school literature text. Due to how the story is interesting and students can get into the character, studying the ancient style of written Chinese isn't so boring.

A summary of The Adventures of Mr Nothing:Mr Nothing is 70 years old. He grew mulberry grains for his entire life, did not associate with the vulgar and did not take praise seriously. People thought of him as a wise man. He was offered official position many times but he rejected it.

After not meeting for a long time, he went drinking with a friend, None (is ๆ— ๆ˜ฏๅ…ฌ which is like Nothing but Mr Nothing is here). The two were very drunk. Mr Nothing woke up but None had almost no signs of life.

The doctor declares that he can't do anything to save None. Mr Nothing became scared, then a friend says that there's a doctor deep in the mountains who can definitely bring None back to life. But the journey is treacherous.

None's wife thinks that Mr Nothing should not watch a friend die and should be ashamed. He thinks she makes sense, and travels to the mountain alone.

As he travels, it starts raining and there is a storm. Nobody would take him in at the nearby village. He finds a temple. There is a corpse of a hung lady, bloody and unkempt. Soon, he sees a ghost of a lady holding a baby. His donkey bellowed, making the ghost notice him.

Perhaps she died here? He was scared. But aren't ghosts the deceased? So he asks 'Are you human or ghost?' The ghost screams. Mr Nothing beats her with his whip, she falls and he escapes.

Later on, he meets a bunch of thieves. Mr Nothing tells them of his plight. They decide not to rob him as it's unlucky to rob a person of justice.

They tell him where to find the elder but he is often gathering herbs at the mountain. So they don't even know if Mr Nothing can meet the elder. The elder treats Mr Nothing to a meal. Mr Nothing says that the situation is urgent

... keep reading on reddit โžก

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I run an etymology podcast and have a hard time expanding my reach.

Hi all,

I don't want to be accused of trying to free advertise on this platform so I'll keep the name of my etymology podcast private.

I started the podcast a few years ago and it's been going well. Still, I'd like to reach more people. I'm thinking of hiring a PR person or market research assistant but don't think I can afford it just yet. Currently, I'm struggling to answer the question 'what group of people would want to listen to an etymology podcast (besides etymologists -- a notoriously crafty and hard to reach demographic)?'

If anyone has any ideas, any projects you're currently working on that reach an audience hungry for etymology, please let me know. Any advice at all would be so tremendously helpful. Thank you!

Edit: WOW! I did not expect this response. I'm always amazed at the support on reddit.

It's called Words for Granted.

This is a link to our website: http://www.wordsforgranted.com

twitter:ย https://twitter.com/wordsforgranted?lang=en

spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/2DHhF0pZM9RHFEbgfuqSFJ?si=44WkWOIrTSa5cHxkxFYjQw

apple podcasts:ย https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/words-for-granted-an-etymology-and-linguistics-podcast/id1123201523

patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wordsforgranted (trying to create more bonus content, newsletters, polls for which words to do next, book recs, and implement a lot of the amazing suggestions you all made)

Thank you again for your interest, it means a lot to me. I hope you enjoy it! And if you have any comments on what you'd like to see, feel free to DM me. Would love to keep up the conversation.

I've also linked in my profile.

I'm going to DM Redditors who asked, in case they don't check this post.

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Earliest confirmed etymology of provinces of Spain
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Nicholas Cage is doing a Netflix series on the etymology of swears and I am BEYOND excited youtube.com/watch?v=XByiHโ€ฆ
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As standard English lacks a distinct plural second person pronoun, dialects have developed new ones. Which one of these three have you seen or heard the most often? (Note: etymologies in the actual post)

Yโ€™all is derived from you all.

Youse was created by adding the plural suffix -s to the stem. The spelling is slightly surprising.

Yinz and its variants come from โ€you onesโ€. This pronoun has many variants, such as yโ€™ins, yunz, youโ€™uns and yenz.

Some extra info: Dialects developed these words because of the lack of distinction between the singular and plural second person pronouns in modern English. This was not always the case; old English had distinct pronouns for singular and plural. As English evolved, it developed a T-V distinction. The pronouns thou and thee were used only for singular, but were regarded as informal. The pronouns you and ye were used for both singular and plural, and were regarded as more formal. It is speculated that eventually the use of thou in singular came to be viewed as impolite. As time went on you replaced the pronoun thou/thee almost completely. Thou and thee still survive in some rare dialects, but generally speaking they have died out almost completely.

View Poll

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Etymology map for the word 'HAMSTER'
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Bypassing Problematic Etymologies

Hey guys,

I was trying to find a suitable name for the people in my world and the art of using their aura to manipulate magnetic forces.

I came upon the concept of animal magnetism, also called mesmerism, which is a title I really liked for the discipline. Defined as something believed to be an invisible natural force possessed by all living things, including humans, animals, and vegetables.

Which really fits the idea of my system with aura and magnetism, and even more so that it was coined in the 18th century and my worldbuilding reflects a lot of items reminiscent of that era.

The problem is: the term refers to Frank Mesmer, a dude that does not exist in my world.

So initially, I thought of scrapping the idea altogether, but then I thought to investigate the surname Mesmer, which conveniently enough is a profession relating to knives, which feature prominently as objects used by the people with such abilities.

So I thought I'd run this by you: can I just ignore or skip an etymological source in favor of its own etymological source? Can I just pretend old Frank does not exist and say 'yeah it has to do with knives?'

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Two possible etymologies of the pause symbol. [Link in comments]
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On the Etymology of Gjallrbru and Thokk (ft. Gjoll, Leiptr, and Sylgr)

Hello and welcome to another installment of the (award-winning) etymological studies series! Today, we are taking a look at the golden staff of Bridal Fjorm and the offensive staff of Loki: Gjallrbru and Thokk (with three weapons from the Nifl royal family making a guest appearance).

Gjallrbru, Y'All...rbru

In Fire Emblem Heroes, Bridal Fjorm's staff Gjallrbru does more than heal allies. It also inflicts Isolation, a status effect that prevents the target from using or receiving Assist skills. The power of Isolation cannot be understated in Heroes, where aggressive use of Assist skills like Dance/Sing and Reposition/Swap enable powerful hit-and-run tactics that can obliterate a team in a single turn.

As one could expect with the general aesthetic of Fire Emblem Heroes, Gjallrbru is Norse in origin. The Norse underworld, Hel, is separated from the land of living by the River Gjoll, like the River Styx in Greek mythology. Whereas crossing the River Styx required assistance from the ferryman Charon, the souls of the dead cross the River Gjoll on a bridge with a roof of thatched, glittering gold. This bridge is called Gjallrbru.

The most significant myth mentioning Gjallrbru is when Baldr and Nanna died. All of the gods greatly mourned Baldr's untimely death. Finally, the goddess Frigg said that someone had to go ransom Baldr from Hel. Baldr's brother, Hermodr, volunteered, riding for nine nights through the dark lands leading to Hel until he at last came to Gjallrbru. Standing guard at Gjallrbru was the battle maiden giant Modgudr. Traditionally, Modgudr allowed the souls of the dead to pass once they stated their business in the land of the dead and was responsible for preventing them from crossing back. When Hermodr stated his unusual quest, Modgudr gave him directions to the Road to Hel.

Thokk As Hel

In Fire Emblem Heroes, Loki's staff is Thokk. This staff has its damage calculated like normal weapons and imposes Gravity on any enemies in Loki's cardinal directions whose hit points are at least three fewer than hers and attack with ranged weapons.

Continuing our story, Hermodr rode onward until he arrived before Hel. Hermodr explained his reason for visiting Hel, who agreed to ransom Baldr on one condition: all things both living and dead had to weep for Baldr. Hermodr, messenger of the gods, transmitted this ultimatum far and wide. All things living and dead wept...except for a giantess named Thokk, who was most likely the trickster god

... keep reading on reddit โžก

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Etymology of the word "emperor" throughout Europe
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Etymology map for the word 'BADGER'
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Folk etymologies be like
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Where does "Thing" come from? Etymology of THING, COSA, ฮ ฮกฮ‘ฮ“ฮœฮ‘, ะ”ะ•ะ›ะž, LUCRU, COISA, DING youtu.be/dAR6IFou-mc
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Nicolas Cage will explore the etymology of swear words on Netflix
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I made an infographic of the etymology of Unix commands.
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Etymology of flowers
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I made my first video about proposals involving Hellenic and Uralic etymologies. I hope you all will enjoy it! youtu.be/pM_QnwHdWqQ
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Nicholas Cage is doing a Netflix series on the etymology of swears and I am BEYOND excited youtube.com/watch?v=XByiHโ€ฆ
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๐Ÿ‘ค︎ u/ale_callmepezza
๐Ÿ“…︎ Dec 28 2020
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Etymology map of Pharmacy
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๐Ÿ“ฐ︎ r/etymologymaps
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๐Ÿ‘ค︎ u/mapologic
๐Ÿ“…︎ Jan 03
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Etymologies of Afro-Eurasian Currencies in English
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๐Ÿ“ฐ︎ r/MapPorn
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๐Ÿ‘ค︎ u/Sabn7
๐Ÿ“…︎ Feb 07
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Etymology of the Maltese, Mediterranean Compass (Cardinal Directions)

I was looking up the cardinal directions in Maltese and thought some members would find the following information interesting. (If you don't already know, Maltese is a Semitic language with a Roman alphabet.)

The word for compass in Maltese is "Warda tal-Irjieฤง" which directly translates to "rose of the wind".

https://imgur.com/a/CZOF2WU The big, cursive words in red (Ix-Xmiel, Ix-Xarq, Il-Qibla, L-Gฤงarb) are old Maltese words deriving from Arabic that are rarely used. We use the Romantic alternatives underneath them however "Riฤง Fuq" (high wind) and "Riฤง Isfel" (low wind) are still used sometimes. I do not know the origins of the other words but "Qibla" is the direction towards the Kaaba (where Muslims pray). It is South because before due South was used for prayer instead of the direction towards Mecca. [From Wikipedia: "Some early Muslims used due south everywhere as the qibla, literally following Muhammad's instruction to face south while he was in Medina (Mecca is due south of Medina)".] I also suspect it links to the word "talba" in Maltese which means prayer but I am not sure.

The other words have more Romantic origins (Latin) and are similar to their Italian counterparts. (Note that they are derived from Maltese come from Malta not the other way around ๐Ÿ˜œ) because Malta used to be in the middle of most Mediterranean maps. They are also similar to French, Spanish, Greek and most other Mediterranean languages in origin.

"Tramuntana" (North) is derived from Latin [trฤns- + montฤnus] meaning 'across mountains' because the Alps are North of Malta.

"Grigal" (Northeast) โ€” 'Grieg/Griega' is the adjective used for something Greek in Maltese. Greece is Northeast of Malta.

"Lvant" (East) โ€” The Levant region is East of Malta.

Map of the above directions

"Xlokk" (Southeast) โ€” This wind comes from the Sahara and often carries sand with it across the Mediterranean. It comes from the Arabic word sharqiyya (ุดุฑู‚ูŠุฉ) meaning East. (Can someone that speaks Arabic confirm this pls).

"Nofsinhar" (South) โ€” Nofsinhar means noon in Maltese. At noon the sun is directly South.

"Lbiฤ‹" (Southwest) โ€” comes from the Latin word meaning 'Libyan'. Libya is Southwest of Malta. EDIT: The Mediaeval Caliphate of Libya was Southwest of Malta, modern Libya is Southeast. The arrow in the diagram is also pointing in the wrong direction. Sorry for the mistake.

"Punent" (West)

... keep reading on reddit โžก

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๐Ÿ“ฐ︎ r/linguistics
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๐Ÿ‘ค︎ u/irrid_immut
๐Ÿ“…︎ Jan 05
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Jupiter etymology- PIE and Sanskrit

Diฤ“s comes from the very, very widespread Proto-Indo-European root dyeu-, dyu-, diwโ€“ โ€œto shine,โ€ and by extension โ€œsky, heaven, god,โ€ source of Latin Juppiter โ€œJupiter,โ€ actually an old vocative formula meaning โ€œFather Jove,โ€ and the exact equivalent to Greek Zeรป pรกter โ€œFather Zeus,โ€ and Sanskrit dyฤฬuแนฃpitฤฬ โ€œFather Heaven.โ€

source

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๐Ÿ“ฐ︎ r/etymology
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๐Ÿ‘ค︎ u/happy_bluebird
๐Ÿ“…︎ Jan 01
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Why do you like etymology? What got you into this?

Not sure if this will be deleted as it isn't a normal post. But I am curious as it is a sub that probably attracts people of all backgrounds, ethnicities, ages, genders etc...

18 years ago I worked for Directory Enquiries in the UK. That was the telephone operator who you phoned and asked for a person's house phone number, or a restaurant phone number, or any business or resident (if listed).

I was searching hundreds of town and city names per day. Recognising several ended with "borough", "chester/cester", "which/wick" or "ton" or had "upon" in them. I was curious as to why, and started buying books or using the internet in internet cafes and was fascinated.

Then discovered words that were the same. And the rest is history.

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๐Ÿ“ฐ︎ r/etymology
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๐Ÿ‘ค︎ u/RyanL1984
๐Ÿ“…︎ Dec 27 2020
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u/deengley gives a comprehensive overview of the etymology of the word "poggers" reddit.com/r/tumblr/commeโ€ฆ
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๐Ÿ“ฐ︎ r/bestof
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๐Ÿ‘ค︎ u/sykomantis2099
๐Ÿ“…︎ Jan 10
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Etymology and Stuff
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๐Ÿ“ฐ︎ r/tumblr
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๐Ÿ‘ค︎ u/Hummerous
๐Ÿ“…︎ Jan 05
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What is the etymology of the German surname "Vontz" ?

I suppose the surname is most famous for the unusual looking building called the Vontz Center for Molecular Studies in Cincinatti.

There's a Yiddish word Vontz which literally means bedbug. Is it possible this surname means ... bedbug?

https://preview.redd.it/ydtv7h96fdc61.jpg?width=290&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=12ae9394934d09bc195e30456b44ead725edee22

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๐Ÿ“ฐ︎ r/etymology
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๐Ÿ‘ค︎ u/frenesigates
๐Ÿ“…︎ Jan 19
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Any podcast recommendations regarding Linguistics and/or etymology?

Iโ€™m a layperson interested in the subject, would love to listen and passively learn. I have listened to an episode of Lexicon Valley but didnโ€™t find it overly compelling, though I may continue anyway. Any other recommendations from yโ€™all? How layperson-friendly or in the weeds the podcast gets doesnโ€™t bother me much, Iโ€™m interested in all of your recommendations.

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๐Ÿ“ฐ︎ r/asklinguistics
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๐Ÿ‘ค︎ u/JustBeforeYourEyes
๐Ÿ“…︎ Feb 11
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What is the etymology of the Scythian word โ€œheziosโ€ meaning โ€œcoveredโ€?

Pliny the Elder claimed, in the 6th book in the 19th chapter of "Naturalis Historia", that the name "Causasus" comes from Scythian "kroi hezios" meaning "snow-covered". The word "kroi" (presumably meaning "snow") is probably cognate to Greek ฮบฯฯ…ฮฟฯ‚ (ice). But where would the Scythian word "hezios" meaning "covered" come from?

Of course, I am not implying Pliny's etymology was right. But I think it is relatively reasonable to believe "kroi hezios" really did mean "snow-covered" in Scythian.

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๐Ÿ“ฐ︎ r/etymology
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๐Ÿ‘ค︎ u/FlatAssembler
๐Ÿ“…︎ Jan 24
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Etymologies of Latin American and Caribbean Countries and Territories
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๐Ÿ“ฐ︎ r/LatinAmerica
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๐Ÿ‘ค︎ u/Aofen
๐Ÿ“…︎ Jan 24
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