TIL Of Travis who was a male common chimpanzee who, in February 2009, attacked and nearly killed a friend of his owner, blinding her while severing several body parts and severely lacerating her face. He was shot dead when he tried to attack a police officer. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tra…
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πŸ“°︎ r/todayilearned
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πŸ‘€︎ u/sirzack92
πŸ“…︎ Oct 08 2020
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The Bonobo is a species in the pan genus, its closest relative is the common chimpanzee. The stature of the bonobo differs from that of a common chimp however, and closely resembles the overall body proportions of australopithecus afarensis. A human ancestor.
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Cyclonimus
πŸ“…︎ Jun 26 2020
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Before Chimpanzees: What was the common ancestor for chimpanzees and hominids? Was that being more chimpanzee like or something different?

I know the sahelanthropus is believed to be one of the links that had shin bones and toe bones that allowed for the start of bipedalism, though I was wondering how chimpanzee like they were and what recent research has found about the β€œcommon ancestor” link for human evolution.

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πŸ“°︎ r/Paleontology
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Sceneselector
πŸ“…︎ Nov 18 2020
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Foetal Atavistic Muscles - Evidence for Human - Chimpanzee, Human - Amphibian/Reptile Common Ancesrry

A relatively recent paper published in 2019 showed further evidence for human-chimpanzee and human-amphibian-reptile common ancestry.

13 embryos ranging from 9 to 13 weeks were immunostained for muscles.

They found a number of muscles present other adult tetrapods, but which disappear during human development.

Some highlights of the article from the whyevolutionistrue blog

> Here are two of the fetal atavistic muscles. First, the dorsometacarpales in the hand, which are present in modern adult amphibians and reptiles but absent in adult mammals. The transitory presence of these muscles in human embryos is an evolutionary remnant of the time we diverged from our common ancestor with the reptiles: about 300 million years ago. Clearly, the genetic information for making this muscle is still in the human genome, but since the muscle is not needed in adult humans (when it appears, as I note below, it seems to have no function), its development was suppressed.

Dorsometacarpales

> Here’s a cool one, the jawbreaking β€œepitrochleoanconeus” muscle, which is present in chimpanzees but not in adult humans. It appears transitorily in our fetuses. Here’s a 2.5 cm (9 GW) embryo’s hand and forearm; the muscle is labeled β€œepi” in the diagram and I’ve circled it

Epitrochochleoanconeus muscle

Now, evolution and common descent explain very well these foetal anatomy findings.

How does creationism with humans being a separate kind from all other organisms explain these foetal anatomical findings?

Common design? Well, we don't have those muscles. Genetic entropy? Funny how during foetal development we have some same muscles as chimpanzees and amphibians/reptiles, as if we had a common ancestor.

Looking forward to some creationists putting their hands up with some explanations!

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πŸ“°︎ r/DebateEvolution
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πŸ‘€︎ u/witchdoc86
πŸ“…︎ Jul 21 2020
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Chimpanzee–human last common ancestor en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chi…
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πŸ“°︎ r/wikipedia
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πŸ‘€︎ u/house_of_ghosts
πŸ“…︎ Nov 03 2020
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Biased Randomness of Mutations is Evidence for Human - Chimpanzee Common Ancestry /r/DebateEvolution/commen…
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πŸ“°︎ r/debatecreation
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πŸ‘€︎ u/witchdoc86
πŸ“…︎ Feb 01 2020
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Common chimpanzee behaviours, like stripping the leaves from a twig and using it to fish for termites, are becoming more rare according to new research that suggests that human activity is wearing down chimpanzee culture. motherboard.vice.com/en_u…
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πŸ‘€︎ u/maxwellhill
πŸ“…︎ Mar 10 2019
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Chimpanzee Culture Is Disappearing Thanks to Climate Change, Study Finds: Common chimpanzee behaviors are disappearing thanks to climate change and proximity to humans. vice.com/en_us/article/kz…
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πŸ“°︎ r/Anthropology
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πŸ‘€︎ u/drak0bsidian
πŸ“…︎ Jul 17 2019
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Biased Randomness of Mutations is Evidence for Human - Chimpanzee Common Ancestry

It appears that due to "fundamental forces", the (methyl)cytosine deamination to thymine (C>T) is a disproportionately common source of mutation. In conjunction with the deamination of guanine to adenine (G>A), and deamination of cytosine to uracil (again ultimately causing a C>T transition if you recall uracil is the RNA replacement of thymine), these processes cause almost 70% of mutations to be "transition" mutations - where purines "transition" to another purine, and a pyramidine "transitions" to another pyramidine - ie T<>C/G<>A mutations); and only 30% of mutations to be "transversions" - that is purine to pyramidine, or pyramidine to purine - ie G<>C/A<>T/A<>C/G<>T mutations.

https://preview.redd.it/jzzqsj4sqdg31.png?width=1108&format=png&auto=webp&s=05d57a5fe3a8ad885df68ceb90cb09af9379404a

The preponderance of the C>T transition means that that this mutation is targeted by ASSUMING G-T mismatches have the T as the error by having thymine-DNA glycosylase excise the presumed erroneous thymine nucleotide when the mismatch is detected (which as you can see, is more often than not, a correct assumption).

https://preview.redd.it/5vrozgupqdg31.png?width=850&format=png&auto=webp&s=b84847d106f30064c1dc93664f7add3fd06d793b

This biased randomness can be seen in comparing human genome de novo mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms - the 1000 genomes project demonstrates that most of our genetic differences are indeed the result of T<>C/G<>A mutations.

https://preview.redd.it/bpzda5llqdg31.png?width=1108&format=png&auto=webp&s=dfe79726cbd5dfce79d50987880735ddb7503cbd

Similarly, if humans and chimpanzees come from a common ancestor by mutations, then we would expect a similar mutation spectrum if the differences are by a mutational process. And, indeed, this is what we see!! The following graph includes the fixed nucleotide differences between chimpanzees

... keep reading on reddit ➑

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πŸ“°︎ r/DebateEvolution
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πŸ‘€︎ u/witchdoc86
πŸ“…︎ Aug 14 2019
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Eldenward. Sharing a common ancestor with elves, the chimpanzee-like eldenward are the fey heralds of druidry that created and bred blink dogs to combat the displacer beast threat. homebrewery.naturalcrit.c…
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πŸ“°︎ r/DnDHomebrew
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πŸ‘€︎ u/LowlyPeanut
πŸ“…︎ Aug 20 2019
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Chimpanzee Culture Is Disappearing Thanks to Climate Change, Study Finds: Common chimpanzee behaviors are disappearing thanks to climate change and proximity to humans. vice.com/en_us/article/kz…
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πŸ“°︎ r/conservation
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πŸ‘€︎ u/drak0bsidian
πŸ“…︎ Jul 17 2019
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My friend (6’0, 180 lbs, 21 yo) armed with a sword and shield, vs a fully grown male common chimpanzee (4’0, 109)

My friend is in good shape but is by no means peak human performance. The chimp is an average of the species

Round 1: A chimpanzee breaks into the house, he’s already got the weapons on him

Round 2: Random encounter in an open field

Round 3: Round 1 but with his dog, (Pitbull, ~55 lbs)

Round 4: Round 2 blood lusted

Bonus: He breaks into the gorillas encounter with his roommates (5’10 ~190 & 5’9 ~160). Can the three of them capture a chimpanzee?

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πŸ“°︎ r/whowouldwin
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Jeden-Rog
πŸ“…︎ Jan 27 2019
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Wild chimpanzees share knowledge of more effective tools: " Cumulative evolution of cultural behavior has long been believed to be limited to humans. Study shows that this is not the case and that chimpanzee cultures can also evolve, suggesting that this was already the case in our common ancestor" news.st-andrews.ac.uk/arc…
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πŸ“°︎ r/sciences
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πŸ‘€︎ u/QuietCakeBionics
πŸ“…︎ Oct 16 2018
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Chimpanzee Culture Is Disappearing Thanks to Climate Change, Study Finds: Common chimpanzee behaviors are disappearing thanks to climate change and proximity to humans. motherboard.vice.com/en_u…
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πŸ“°︎ r/environment
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πŸ‘€︎ u/cryptoz
πŸ“…︎ Mar 09 2019
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Wild chimpanzees share knowledge of more effective tools: " Cumulative evolution of cultural behavior has long been believed to be limited to humans. Study shows that this is not the case and that chimpanzee cultures can also evolve, suggesting that this was already the case in our common ancestor" news.st-andrews.ac.uk/arc…
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πŸ“°︎ r/likeus
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πŸ‘€︎ u/QuietCakeBionics
πŸ“…︎ Oct 16 2018
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An articulated common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) skeleton at the Henry Doorly Zoo. It is mounted in the Hubbard Gorilla Forest exhibit.
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Jefmh
πŸ“…︎ Jul 18 2018
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In common chimpanzee societies, how do infants/juveniles differ in terms of food access during development?

I'm probably making many assumptions that show a general lack of understanding of chimpanzee behavior, and I apologize for that. Hopefully someone will still try to provide an explanation and show errors in my thinking.

So my questions are:

Do most infants have access to a similar amount of food? Is there a ranking system that determines how much food different infants can get? Which factors lead to inequality in terms of nutrition, if that occurs at all?

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πŸ“°︎ r/askscience
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πŸ‘€︎ u/neumann345
πŸ“…︎ Sep 21 2018
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Bonobo anatomy reveals stasis and mosaicism in chimpanzee evolution, and supports bonobos as the most appropriate extant modeο»Ώl for the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans nature.com/articles/s4159…
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πŸ“°︎ r/Anthropology
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πŸ‘€︎ u/burtzev
πŸ“…︎ May 05 2017
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TIL The age of divergence between lice and its common ancestor is estimated to be 6-7 million years ago and matches the age predicted by chimpanzee-hominid divergence. However, genetic evidence suggests that our human ancestors acquired pubic lice from gorillas approximately 3-4 million years ago. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lou…
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πŸ“°︎ r/todayilearned
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πŸ‘€︎ u/ABKB
πŸ“…︎ Apr 06 2015
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Bonobo anatomy reveals stasis and mosaicism in chimpanzee evolution, and supports bonobos as the most appropriate extant modeο»Ώl for the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans nature.com/articles/s4159…
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πŸ“°︎ r/evolution
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πŸ‘€︎ u/burtzev
πŸ“…︎ May 05 2017
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TIL The humanzee (also known as the Chuman or Manpanzee) is a hypothetical chimpanzee/human hybrid. Chimpanzees and humans are closely related (95% of their DNA sequence, and 99% of coding DNA sequences are in common), leading to contested speculation that a hybrid is possible. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hum…
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πŸ“°︎ r/todayilearned
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πŸ‘€︎ u/batboy132
πŸ“…︎ Nov 20 2012
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Bonobo anatomy reveals stasis and mosaicism in chimpanzee evolution, and supports bonobos as the most appropriate extant model for the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans nature.com/articles/s4159…
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πŸ“°︎ r/primatology
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πŸ‘€︎ u/burtzev
πŸ“…︎ May 05 2017
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TIL that Human head and body lice share a common ancestor with chimpanzee lice, while pubic lice share a common ancestor with gorilla lice en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lou…
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πŸ“°︎ r/todayilearned
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πŸ‘€︎ u/errbodiesmad
πŸ“…︎ Sep 01 2015
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What human faces and chimpanzee butts have in common--and what it tells us about sex and psychology lehmiller.com/blog/2016/1…
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πŸ“°︎ r/psychologyofsex
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πŸ‘€︎ u/psychologyofsex
πŸ“…︎ Dec 28 2016
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Bonobo anatomy reveals stasis and mosaicism in chimpanzee evolution, and supports bonobos as the most appropriate extant modeο»Ώl for the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans (x post /r/primatology) nature.com/articles/s4159…
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πŸ“…︎ May 05 2017
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Common Chimpanzee family (Pan Troglodytes), at Wellington zoo [OC] [5208x3476] flickr.com/photos/1278694…
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πŸ“°︎ r/AnimalPorn
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πŸ‘€︎ u/peterlikescheese
πŸ“…︎ Nov 26 2014
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TIL that the last Chimpanzee-Human common ancestor lived up to 6,000,000 years ago. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chi…
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πŸ“°︎ r/todayilearned
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πŸ‘€︎ u/luciussullafelix
πŸ“…︎ Jun 18 2015
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Chimpanzee–human last common ancestor en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chi…
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πŸ“°︎ r/wikipedia
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πŸ‘€︎ u/linuxjava
πŸ“…︎ Sep 19 2016
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Human ancestor was less-chimp-like than thought: Last common ancestor of Man & Ape was not a knuckle-walking, tree-swinging hominid resembling today's chimpanzee, says study challenging long-held theories of human evolution. phys.org/news/2013-12-hum…
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πŸ“°︎ r/Anthropology
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πŸ‘€︎ u/anutensil
πŸ“…︎ Dec 04 2013
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Peaceful bonobos may have something to teach humans - Humans share 98.7 percent of our DNA with chimpanzees, but we share 1 important similarity with one species of chimp, the common chimpanzee, that we don't share with the other, the bonobo physorg.com/news/2011-03-…
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πŸ“°︎ r/nature
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πŸ‘€︎ u/anutensil
πŸ“…︎ Mar 09 2011
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In this corner, Pan trogolodytes, or the common chimpanzee. In the other, an American mortgage banker. Which has a more highly evolved sense of fairness? Thanks to a combination of psychological experimentation and economic happenstance, the truth can now be known. thebigmoney.com/articles/…
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πŸ“°︎ r/science
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πŸ‘€︎ u/spif
πŸ“…︎ Jun 06 2010
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