Countries with governments that favor Christianity cause their residents to become less attached to their faith, a new study has suggested, based on an analysis of 166 countries. This helps explain large declines in the number of people across the U.S. and Europe who identify as Christian. academictimes.com/governm…
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Why is criticizing Christianity acceptable in progressive circles but criticizing Islam is racist?

Edit: β€œracist” Islam is not a race, I meant racist in the way that people accuse criticism of Islam as being racist (and a true criticism)

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Christianity does it's destructive work...again.

I live in a grossly religious area of Tennessee. I am an atheist and my wife is Christian. I have 2 daughters, one in College and one a Freshman in high school. We raise our daughters to think for themselves. Religion or lack thereof is a decision that they must come to through their own efforts.

Last fall, my youngest has had a boyfriend break up with her for being non-religious. This was no doubt influenced by his parents. I know them and they are fanatical to say the least. Last weekend her best friend went to a church camp. She called my daughter late Friday night and told here she had something important to discuss but wouldn't say what it was until she saw her at school today. That in and of itself was a crappy thing to do. I had a strong suspicion that religion would be the issue. I was right. The young lady gave my daughter back her best friend necklace and essentially cast her aside due to advice she received at the camp that "opened her eyes". She is devastated.

This makes me so angry. What kind of message is this? Cast others off that don't believe as you do? It's deplorable. I have half-a-mind to find the "qualified" youth councilors that gave her this terrible advice and confront them. This is reprehensible and destructive. I am seething.

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Seriously the Anti-Christianity can be annoying
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If you tell a child that they are depraved, evil, vile, and deserving of execution from birth β€” that impacts their self worth, self image and ultimately what kind of person they become. That’s exactly what Christianity teaches, and it fucks people up. Cancel that toxic shit.

Christianity teaches people that they are inherently evil, vile and depraved.

It teaches people that they are so evil that they are deserving of being summarily executed.

So evil that someone had to be violently murdered in their place.

If you teach a child that they are evil and vile, that impacts their value, self worth, self image, etc. and ultimately influenced what kind of individual they grow up to become.

If you believe you’re evil, you are more likely to act evil.

This is what religion teaches and it is toxic and destructive.

Cancel religion.

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Martin Scorsese and Paul Schrader are Working on a β€˜Three-Year Series’ About β€˜Origins of Christianity’ indiewire.com/2021/04/mar…
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"God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him." Almost 140 years ago, Nietzsche wrote about the death of God. The quotation was not just to represent the fall of Christianity, but also a guide to escape nihilism that awaited humans. youtu.be/75Ia0uTwxOU
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Gatekeeping Christianity
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But what if the child consents to be enslaved? r/Christianity debates whether or not the slavery in the Bible is moral.
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How has the decline of denominational Christianity in the US affected politics?

A Gallup poll (U.S. Church Membership Falls Below Majority for First Time (gallup.com)) released earlier this year, showed that the majority of Americans no longer attend church on a regular basis. More specifically, it appears that mainline protestants, along with Catholics, are seeing a notable decline in attendance and affiliation. How do you think this decline will impact the structure of each party and their approach to governance?

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[OC] [Remix] A Wordcloud for each of the Six Largest Religions and their Religious Texts (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; Hinduism, Buddhism, and Sikhism)
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"Christianity, the belief that a God created a universe 13.79 billion years old, 93 billion light years in diameter, consisting of over 200 billion galaxies, each containing an average of 200 billion stars, only to have a personal relationship with you" twitter.com/Caring_Atheis…
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Anon has doubts about christianity
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What is one thing about Christianity that you just don't get?
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New study links evangelical Christianity to phallic insecurity in the United States - The findings suggest that America’s evangelical subculture perpetuates insecurities about penis size. psypost.org/2021/04/new-s…
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Garni Temple, the only pagan structure in Armenia that survived after conversion to Christianity
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β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €β €Centrism is forgetting Christianity was forced on African countries reddit.com/r/PoliticalCom…
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Quadrants' views on christianity
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Freedom of religion applies to all religions, not just Christianity.
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Christianity does not make so much sense to me anymore.

Christianity does not make so much sense to me anymore. I cant understand why we have to have faith in order to get saved and that our works cant get us to heaven. I mean, we have a sinful nature and our nature prevents us entering heaven? It just does not make sense to me.

Also, there are many religions out there. You cant expect a different religion person to give up their religions and follow Christianity just because someone may told them to do it.

There is much deception in this world and I cant blame a different religion person for not giving up his religion that he grew up with to become Christian.

So, all that does not make sense to me.

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Because the entire motivation for good works is either reward or escaping punishment, Christianity is ultimately a selfish religion.

The Bible tells Christians to do good works for other people. Why? Because it benefits the other person, or because it will benefit them? Christians claim their religion is about self-sacrifice, but there's not a single good work the Christian does the name of Christianity for no future benefit.

Every commandment in the Bible is given with a warning that disobeying it will bring consequences, and obeying will bring eventual reward. This is the motivation for any apparent "self-sacrifice" made by the Christian.

When you leave your wife, or lands, or houses or brothers, what's the motivation? Jesus answered for us:

We'll get 100x more later!

What did Christ offer as the main incentive for belief?

That you live eternally and you won't go to Hell.

Why do good works, then? Why love your neighbor?

Because good works are proof that you're saved, will live eternally and you won't go to Hell.

Why give money and possessions to others?

So your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you!

Even when the Christian makes considerable effort not to "let the right hand see what the left hand does," is this so that the charitable act goes forever unnoticed and the act remains genuine? No! It's so you don't blow your future reward which will be even better than having people recognize how nice you are now!

No good work performed in the name of Christianty is ever done without the expectation of future reward. Christianity is undeniably about eternal self-benefit. Even Christ's own sacrifice was performed for his own glory.

If you're "sacrificing" now to reap benefit later, you're not sacrificing at all. You're investing. Any good works you perform are performed for your own good - and this is the Bible's own design.

Christianity is not about true self-sacrifice, but an appearance of selflessness for future personal reward.

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Second biggest religion in the US after Christianity.
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The Christianity Iceberg happy too add any I missed
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Christianity 1 - Paganism 0
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There was a post about that Christian Missionary who was killed by the protected tribe on North Sentinel Island near India when he tried to convert them to Christianity. I decided to look at the island on google maps and stumbled upon a shipwreck on the Northwest coast of the island.
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I'm 18 years old but my parents will not let me move out until I convert to Christianity and graduate Christian College

I added a GoFundMe in case anyone wants to help me gofundme.com/qvjvct-trying-to-move-out I have a job I'm 18 years old but my parents will not let me move out because they want to convert me to Christianity and they said that they're not going to let me move out of the house until I graduate from Christian College which I've been forced to go to for 2 years and I have two more years and the job that I have doesn't pay enough where I can move out When I say they won't let me move out they will let me move out but I will be homeless and I wouldn't feel safe and I got some money saved up for a shared apartment I don't have a car I'm about $250 away from being able to afford the shared apartment and that will take me about 10 to 12 weeks because they make me buy my food my clothes anything I need they make me buy it

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πŸ‘€︎ u/godiluvluck
πŸ“…︎ May 05
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I believe that religion (mostly Christianity) is made out of fear and to control people.

So i was raised Catholic for 16 years (I'm 17 now turning 18 in a few months). Went to very, very religious schools. I never really questioned the religion (well, I've been having doubts when i was 15) until i met my classmate's brother who's an atheist. I asked her (my classmate) why her brother doesn't believe in God, and she said that her brother doesn't believe because he said the Bible doesn't make sense (it also doesn't help that he's gay). And my doubts and skepticism made me think logically. Here's my take on the belief's logic.

*God is all good and all powerful - i believe that this is impossible, considering the way the world has been for thousands of years. If he actually exists, then he's either all good BUT not all powerful, or he's all powerful BUT not good. He cannot be both.

*God gave us free will, but he also has everything planned - you know how bonkers that sounds? Free will and "everything planned" doesn't go hand in hand. If everything is already planned, then we logically don't have free will. And if we really have free will, then obviously, everything isn't planned.

*When we ask for proof of God's existence, they answer with "look around you, the proof is everywhere" - hun, do you know how nuts you sound? That's not proof. That's excuses. They also hit us with "read the bible", like girl, I've been forced reading the bible since i was like 7, and i just found the stories interesting. I didn't see it as a real proof of a God's existence.

*Nothing can exist without a creator - ok, let's say that's true, let's say your thinking is logical, then by going by your own logic, WHO created your God? And the answer i always receive is "no one, because he already existed". Aren't you contradicting your own argument? Like you're going against what you're saying.

*How can they wholeheartedly blindly believe a story written thousands of years ago by people who doesn't have the same knowledge as we do know? People before even thought being gay was a sickness, which we have proved now that it isn't, and people used to put arsenic everywhere, little did they know it could literally kill them. Imagine all the things they believed back then (those who wrote the books), we never know, turns out "Jesus" was just a magician that loves to scam gullible people.

*The bible is true, because places in the bible can be found in real life - well duh? I think they're forgetting that the bible was created by HUMANS, who live in REAL PLACES. If i was a writ

... keep reading on reddit ➑

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My Christianity Iceberg!
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As a society, we need to talk more about the destructive role of Evangelical Christianity. Some of the things they believe are buck wild and directly contribute to things like Trump and Q.

I grew up in an interesting household, religiously speaking. My dad was a nondenominational Christian, and his beliefs were heavily influenced by the rise of modern evangelicalism and the Christian right. He shows a lot of reverence for the traditions of Judaism, and he's a Zionist (like many evangelicals), but he also speaks of Jews as being somehow inferior. In my experience, talking about how "Hitler did some good things too" isn't all that uncommon in these kinds of Christian communities.

I grew up exposed to some of the most alarming things that they believe. Here's an example. To sum it up, there is a part of evangelical Christianity that believes the European Union is going to bring the end of the world by uniting the international community against the followers of Christ. There are variations of this conspiracy theory that say the world is going to unite against Israel specifically, and only the people who still support Israel in the End Times will be saved by Christ and brought to heaven.

This kind of theory is extremely dangerous because it breeds fear of things like international cooperation. There are Christians out there, right now, who are shaking in their boots at the idea of things like the United Nations because they literally believe it is a sign that the world is going to end. The idea of a united humanity is terrifying to them, so they love politicians who stoke division against other countries because it means the world is going to last a few more years.

And that link I posted is just ONE example.

It's not hard to convince these people that there's a global cabal of satanic pedophiles who cooperate across international lines, because they already believe the Bible warned them about that.

I know there are more ways in which these beliefs are destructive, but my memory is foggy and I'm not exactly interested in starting a conversation with my dad or anyone else in order to find out what they believe. I'm sure some other people in this subreddit have experience with this, and I hope someone will provide more examples.

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The New Testament Contradicts All of Christianity

Following the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, the 'Christians' of the time in this middle period between the death of Jesus and the emergence of the New Testament did not refer to Jesus as a God, Son of God, etc,. but rather a prophet or messiah (main conversion came from the Jews, rarely from the Romans).

However, a Jewish man named Paul that prosecuted Christians received a revelation from Jesus himself and he went blind. He then began preaching that Jesus was the Son of God which ultimately led to different factions and group such as Catholicism and eventually Protestantism, etc. Following this was the New Testament. The New Testament in Christianity is put on a higher pedestal than that of the Old Testament.

This poses the first problem: Christians believe that the Old Testament is the literal word of God yet put some letter written by a Jewish msn above it. The original followers of Jesus during his time preached Jesus' message through the gospel, the idea that he was the Son of God never existed in the Old Testament thus the New Testament completely contradicts Christianity's primary scripture.

The second problem is the credibility of St. Paul: St. Paul claims to have had went blind and had his sight restored by Ananias of Damascus. For one thing, the existence of Ananias cannot even be proven historically, so this account should easily be discarded. Nevertheless, Paul was in a rather populated area when he went blind and also was in public when his sight was allegedly restored. There have been no eye-witnesses for such an account like Jesus' miracles in the Old Testament.

Finally the basis of the New Testament is that Jesus claims he was the Son of God to St. Paul. For one thing, there is no historical evidence or encounter of Jesus claiming he was the Son of God. If he did, wouldn't it have been a better title to put on his cross instead of "King of the Jews"? This title is actually in accordance to what his original message was, which he preached he was the messiah.

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Calling Jews "white colonialists" is not just anti-Semitic and anti-Israel, but anti-Palestine. Palestinians practice Islam + Christianity. Both believe that Abraham, Moses, and Jesus existed, and were Jewish, in ancient Israel.

That's why they're called Abrahamic religions...

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The argument that people know Christianity is true but choose not to be Christian so they can keep sinning is not a good argument

A question often comes up in Christianity. A Christian would obviously believe that it’s rational to believe Christianity is true. Whatever evidence or arguments or philosophies or what have you that is present and available is more than enough for it to be rational to think Christianity is true.

And yet, many people who are seemingly rational are not Christians even when presented with all of this evidence, arguments, etc. What gives?

I am addressing the Christians who think that people who are presented with reasons why Christianity is true but who are still not Christians are still rational. They do know Christianity is true. They know the god of the Bible exists. They simply want to keep sinning. If they became Christian, they would have to stop committing sins that they enjoy committing.

You hear it in sermons all the time. You see it in Christian propaganda films like God’s Not Dead. It’s levied against atheists who used to be christian.

Importantly, it is not a good argument.

What is one of the hallmarks of rationality? What’s one of the ways scientists test the intelligence and rational thinking skills of other animals? It’s the ability to forgo a small reward immediately in return for a larger reward later. Intelligent animals, for instance, will forgo a single piece of food if they know, or at least have very good reason to think, that they’ll get ten pieces of food later if they don’t take the one and eat it now. Good students work hard in school and sometimes forgo parties and social situations so that they’ll be better off in the future and thus more able to do the good things they’re giving up now. People invest in stocks because they think that there is good reason to expect they’ll have more money in the future that they can do more with than if they just spent their investment money on things here and now.

My point is this: if rational people have good reason to expect forgoing a small reward now will allow them to gain a larger reward later, then they will forgo the small reward now.

Now, back to the argument at hand. It claims that rational people who choose not to be Christian know that Christianity is true, but choose to not be Christian so they can keep sinning. These people are not behaving rationally.

For this argument to be true, the non Christian must fully expect to go to hell for eternity for not accepting Jesus, and they must believe hell is a bad thing. They must fully believe that heaven is the best possible th

... keep reading on reddit ➑

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The trilema of the fate of those unaware of Christianity

I’ve spoken on this before but want to bring it back and see what sort of responses I get. I’ll simplify and broaden it.

There are three logically possible outcomes for people who are completely unaware of Christianity.

1. Their fate is better than had they heard of it

This creates a problem for a Christian who holds this as true, as suddenly the very religion of Christianity is harmful.

2. Their fate is worse than had they heard of it

This creates a problem in which the god of Christianity is inherently unjust and unfair. DCT can solve this, but it’s quite a bullet to bite to claim that it’s just to allow unavoidable harm to people who could not do anything about it or even know why the harm has come. It also leads one to question if Christianity is valid if it is to be believed that god has no problem punishing people for not knowing something they never had a chance to know. A god with this character could not be trusted.

3. Their fate is no different than had they heard of it

This creates a problem in which the religion of Christianity is completely irrelevant. In such a scenario, the worlds where Christianity does exist and where it does not exist are basically indistinguishable from each other.

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The doctrine of eternal conscious torment is the main factor that drives people away from Christianity.

Nearly every β€œspiritual but not religious,” agnostic, or atheist I speak to say the same thing: ECT is diabolical.

I have a friend whose father committed suicide. Her Christian friends (not me) were quick to make it known to her that her father was burning in hell, and will be for all of eternity. My friends daughter was told that because she is a Methodist, she is going to burn in hell for all of eternity.

My friend will never ever become a Christian because she believes that admitting Christianity is true is equivalent to admitting that her sweet father, who loved painting nature and writing beautiful poetry, who loved her beyond words and sacrificed so much for her, is burning in hell and will be for all of eternity.

I am a Roman Catholic, but I cannot reconcile ECT with God’s loving nature. I am considering orthodox Christianity.

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"I don't care about your Goddamned religion". A woman goes off on Christianity & Abortion ! twitter.com/Caring_Atheis…
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Christianity in a nutshell v.redd.it/v2nfwdle0xw61
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The Fundamental Claim of Christianity (That Jesus is the Messiah) Relies on Circular Logic

Christianity begins with the assumption that Jesus is the Son of God and the Messiah. It then works backward, claiming that certain verses are messianic prophecies simply because, to them, the verse sounds like it is talking about Jesus (who they already decided is the Messiah). It does the same thing when discussing Jesus' sacrifice on the cross. It begins with the assumption that Jesus is the son of God and the Messiah. it then claims that none of the Levitical laws about sacrifice apply because Jesus "fulfilled" or "superseded" Mosaic law on account of him being the Messiah. It does this without actually demonstrating either that Jesus is the Messiah or that the sacrificial laws were changed by God. How then do Christians know that the law was changed? Because Jesus didn't adhere to the old laws. And since they already decided that Jesus is God, whatever he did or said is the new de facto law.

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Deprogram Me from Christianity

Hey guys I’m struggling between believing and not believing at this rate I choose not to believe but in times of fear I simply give in and get on my knees and beg God to save me. how do I deal with the shit.

Tell my how to disbelieve in Christianity. I’m trying to adopt daosm.

Live for myself instead of others expectations.

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The religion of Islam depends on Christianity being β€œcorrupted” and to a lesser extent Judaism

Quite frankly Islam should just drop the whole β€œwe are the true religion and Christianity is just corrupted”. The belief in Islam is that Koran has been preserved and the Bible hasn’t despite being once true. We run into problems when you take in that would mean that God purposely let the Bible get corrupted but promised to make the Koran. Why is that? What makes the Bible any different? The only conclusion one can come up with is that he cared about one book more than the other and that runs into another section of problems. Not to mention nobody can give a for sure answer which parts of the Bible are corrupted and which isn’t. Things like the Trinity are dispelled but Jesus was a real prophet despite the two being intertwined in Christianity. Islam picks and throws whatever it wants from Christianity but then claim it’s the true religion. Another issues that comes about is the religion is vastly different. Prohibiting liquor, practicing child marriage, having multiple marriages and banning certain foods was not originally in Christianity. The food banning does draw back to Judaism but we are coming from the pov that Christianity is false. Islam is better of just sticking to being a religion and not β€œwe are the true form the Abrahamic religions” because the facts don’t add up on what exactly was corrupted. That’s quite a vague statement and how much of the Bible was corrupted? When you ask this the most you’ll get is someone posting different translations of the same verse or added verses the whole world is aware of that was added later.

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πŸ“°︎ r/DebateReligion
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Soirratatingxoxo
πŸ“…︎ May 09
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The Two Popes (2019) is quite an interestingly intimate and human take on Christianity that we rarely see in films that are about Christianity or have themes of Christianity in them.

In most Christian films that I am familiar with, they often glorify or romanticise the religion, sometimes even to the extreme by dehumanising or even demonising those who are not Christian or are sceptical of the religion while also angelise the followers or the believers of the religion.

I think that this is not appealing and does not give room for discussion or exploration of the religion and how it evolved over the years and it is mostly propaganda, especially when some parts of the world such as the U.S. heavily integrate religion with politics (sometimes even indoctrinate it) that some people actually use this for profit or for personal gain.

But in the Two Popes, it is actually quite different and I felt this too when I saw the series, the Young Pope.

In this film, there is a human feel in the story. The religion is not as heavily romanticised as I often felt whenever I encountered a film that promotes this religion.

It delves more in the human and sometimes even the political and philosophical element of the religion as well. In the film, not every Christian (or Roman Catholic for that matter because the Pope is the head of the Roman Catholic church) thinks the same. Heck, not even the Pope and there were plenty of arguments and discourse between Pope Benedict XVI and the later Pope Francis.

The popes are not depicted as this purely holy figure that can do no wrong and is always connected to God. Heck, even the Pope is shown to express doubts or thinks that he is not as connected to God as he once was. We are shown elements of the two popes sharing their own experiences about their development and growth with the religion but at the same time, it shows that not everyone is 100% sure that they are as devoted as they think they are meant to be since even the religion itself is open to different interpretations.

On top of that, we get to see the two popes being quite human. We see Pope Benedict playing the piano or simply drinking Fanta instead of the usual red wine during mass.

We see the two popes eating pizza in the Vatican and we later see the two popes watching football with beer on their side.

It was honestly a really interesting and funny and compelling take on the portrayal of the religion as a whole and the people who are involved in the religion especially the fact that the film focused a lot on two popes who are often deemed as holy in many aspects but in truth, they are as human as everyone else.

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πŸ‘€︎ u/sammyjamez
πŸ“…︎ Apr 17
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If Christianity originated from the middle east why isnt it as popular there anymore?

I dont understand how literally majority of countries there are all Muslim, how is it possible that the birthplace of Jesus aren't even Christians?

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πŸ‘€︎ u/Bvllvj
πŸ“…︎ Apr 30
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making fun of christianity is seen as PC while making fun of islam will piss off everyone

a lot of people (generally on the left end of the political spectrum) think its fine to make fun of christianity because it has homophobic verses but islam is a lot more homophobic than christianity and many muslims advocate for the death penalty (at least much higher % than christians) for gay people however when someone points this out they are seen as islamophobic which doesn't make any sense because a phobia is an IRRATIONAL fear of something whereas if you are gay or apostate of islam you have every right to be scared because many (most) islamic countries enforce the death penalty for apostacy and most muslims think that it is okay.

take for example chris pratt being cancelled because he was christian and it was assumed that he was homophobic? if the same was done to a muslim actor the people trying to cancel them would be banned. it makes no sense and this is blatant hypocrisy.

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πŸ‘€︎ u/Supersanic-wave
πŸ“…︎ Apr 06
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