Seeing a lot of swollen bracts. That does mean I've probably got seeds? imgur.com/a/lKm58ww
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πŸ“°︎ r/outdoorgrowing
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πŸ‘€︎ u/lo-key-glass
πŸ“…︎ Oct 26 2020
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"GOLD DIGGERS" / SEASON 9, EPISODE 16 / PREVIEW + PART II

Here are the links for the full episode from FEB 15th's broadcast of "Eyes and Boot in the Ground" (Ep. 15), and the trailer preview of the "next episode" (MAR 1, #16), the isolated NEXT TIME teaser from the end of episode #15). A new official "Preview" for #16 has not yet been posted by History but will be placed here if/when available. The #16 episode ("Gold Diggers") is set to be aired on MAR 1, 2022. On MAR 8 (#17) "Blast from the Past" is scheduled to run.

EPISODE 15 (Feb 15 replay): Eyes and Boot in the Ground | HISTORY

"The team is stunned when new scientific evidence supports the theory that the Knights Templar were involved in the Oak Island mystery, and the big dig uncovers some surprising relics."

The 'clue' used to once again resurrect Zena Halpern's Templar theory was the indecipherable bag seal found by Gary Drayton, the test for which indicated the lead was apparently mined in a region of France where a Templar stronghold once existed. The lead could have been obtained and recycled by any number of other countries, however, undermining the idea that any treasure on Oak Island must have been deposited by the French (Templars or otherwise).

The first (and most promising?) oscillator dig into the 'offset chamber' did not produce any support for Rick's claim that "we have hard evidence that there's gold at depth in the Money Pit." Robert Clotworthy' narrative contribution even raised it to the level of "solid gold". The team is perhaps being misled in their hopes by trace particles only, which tend to collect and bond into amalgams within stone crevices, and on pieces of rough metal, where they can even create small nuggets and veins. A treasure of coins or bars is another matter entirely.

'NEXT TIME' TRAILER (for #16): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfYEKdkP4QI

"An incredible discovery is made near the swamp as Rick, Marty and the team continue digging in the Money Pit in search of the fabled treasure vault, following a path first forged by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt."

OFFICIAL PREVIEW (#16): Appearance pending.

*********************************************************************************

Here's Jerry Brown's Monsters & Critics recap of the last episode aired, **"Eyes and Boot in t

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πŸ“°︎ r/OakIsland
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πŸ‘€︎ u/prospero_duke
πŸ“…︎ Feb 25
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Fertilizing in the winter?

Look, I know fertilizing houseplants in the winter is a big no no, because they're supposed to rest and all that, but here's the thing: none of my plants are resting! I live in zone 10b and keep them in an unheated greenhouse, which means that although sometimes the temperature can get relatively close to freezing at night (never actually freezing tho), during the day the temperature is nice and warm, sometimes even hot, all throughout winter.

So my Catharanthus are still blooming. Granted, their flowers are really tiny and sparse, but they're still going at it, and one of them has a seed pod that's maturing as we speak...! i don't think it's the greenhouse that's confusing them, as I have the same plant outside, fully exposed to weather, and that too throws a flower or two once in a while.

I also have a Kalanchoe that's in full bloom, really majestic, and a few ridiculously stubborn Mirabilis jalapa that keep pushing out new growth only for that to go chlorotic and die back, over and over again. Finally, a really tiny red poinsettia that just keeps pushing out loads of new bracts like there's no tomorrow. Not that i dislike it, it looks absolutely fantastic, but does it need a little boost?

So what do I do? Do I just fertilize? All of them?

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πŸ“°︎ r/houseplants
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Jesse_etk
πŸ“…︎ Jan 19
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will a full sun plant only bloom on sections that get full sun?

I have a bougainvillea that is growing against an east facing fence. I don't believe it's getting enough sun to really thrive from the ground to the top of the fence, as this section consists of very few blooms/bracts and lots of large deep green leaves. However, the plant is starting to get taller than the fence. The sections of branches that reach above the fence line enjoy full sun nearly all day long. I can already see more buds/bracts blooming on these sections of the plants.

I am wonder if, as the plant matures, and more branches reach above the fence, the whole plant will bloom more, or just those tall sections above the fence line. I'm just naive, I suppose, to how plants work. Does the sun exposure to specific sections benefit the plant as a whole (meaning shaded sections of the plant will bloom as a result of the top section getting full sun), or is the benefit of sunlight exposure more locally focused to those sections enjoying the sunlight?

I suppose I will find out in time, but am curious to hear the input of more knowledgeable people.

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πŸ“°︎ r/plantclinic
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πŸ“…︎ Nov 27 2021
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A stoner sci-fi horror comedy movie, where a highly intelligent alien race breeds humans, harvests their reproductive organs when they reach full maturity and consumes them to get high, just like what we do with cannabis πŸ˜‚

I thought about it today after I plucked off bracts with bananas from my first stunted plant, vaped them and got quite high (still not ready to harvest though) lol

So I'm sitting there vaping, looking at the plant and thinking... isn't it kinda cruel? I mean this girl was growing up in poor conditions, ended up too stressed, saw where this is going and decided to grow dicks to produce offspring before her death. And now I'm cutting off these dicks so that she doesn't loose her virginity/potency, while vaping them to get high lmao

You know, when we grow vegetables and fruits, at least we let them have sex before we eat them πŸ˜‚

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πŸ“°︎ r/highdeas
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πŸ‘€︎ u/voidvine
πŸ“…︎ Oct 12 2021
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Common Types of Mold Found in Hemp Plants

Hope you guys are getting your week off to a great start! Here is some information on the different types of mold found in hemp plants.

Gray Mold - The fungus, Botrytis cinerea (teleomorph: Botryotinia fuckeliana), is an opportunistic pathogen that easily invades weak, damaged, or senescing tissue. This fungus is very common in the Pacific Northwest and occurs worldwide in greenhouses. Cannabis can be killed within one week. Spores (conidia) are produced throughout the growing season under a wide range of temperatures and humidity; and stem infections are a durable inoculum source, producing conidia throughout bloom. Cool temperatures (68Β°F is optimal but the fungus can grow between 50Β° and 80Β°F), high humidity, and free water on plant surfaces favor the disease, as do close plant spacing and irrigation practices that keep plants wet for a longer time. Durable sclerotia overwinter in soil.

Symptoms The pathogen causes brown, water-soaked spots on buds or chlorotic areas on stems. Buds eventually rot producing a gray-brown mass of spores; infections start within buds. Botrytis cankers develop to the point of limb breakage or stem splitting, especially if plant canopies are dense and heavy. Small, black sclerotia can develop within stem tissues. Like the buds, cankers produce gray-brown masses of spores. Seedlings can also be killed.

Cultural control

  • Limit irrigation during and after bloom. Irrigate in the morning so plants do not stay wet more than 12 hours.
  • In greenhouses, maintain the relative humidity below 50%, temperatures warm, and high light intensity. Filtering out UV light may prevent epidemics since sporulation requires UV light.
  • Avoid over-fertilization with nitrogen.
  • Canopy management is the best preventive method.

Powdery Mildew - Is caused by a fungus, Podosphaera macularis (formerly Sphaerotheca humuli) or Golovinomyces (Erysiphe) cichoracearum. Although P. macularis also is reported on hop, strawberry, and caneberries, races that attack hemp are probably limited to Cannabis. How these pathogens overwinter in the Pacific Northwest is unknown.

Symptoms Infections on susceptible leaves appear as whitish, powdery spots on either the upper or lower leaf surface. Entire leaf surfaces can be covered with powdery mildew and leaf petioles can also be infected as well as flower bracts. As powdery mildew patches age, ascocarps (small, nearly spherical fruiting bodies) may become visible as they turn from ye

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πŸ“°︎ r/hempflowers
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πŸ‘€︎ u/FernValleyCBD
πŸ“…︎ Dec 14 2020
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Some weed 101 for the community, hope y'all appreciate it!

Just a little base-level info I thought I'd share with fellow enthusiasts.

On certain physiological aspects of the cannabis sativa plant, commonly known as marihuana, hemp, cannabis, etcetera:

We’ll begin by looking at the plant’s presentation; we’ll talk about cannabinoids, their hydric relations, about photosynthesis, the ground and its mineral nutrients, and we’ll end by talking about its growth dynamics.

https://preview.redd.it/6yqga54t6rz61.png?width=705&format=png&auto=webp&s=aff84262ee44e75fb808079e380fd155a6f1d5c8

The cannabis sativa plant of the cannabaceae family is a dioecious annual herbal plant, which means it has separate sexes: male and female plants.

Common in warmer areas, the plant possesses a height of anywhere between 5 and 20 feet, and females are usually the bushiest and longest lasting of both sexes. Normally leaves are developed in a palm shape with some 5 to 7 leaves per palm, with the largest leaf in the center.

Each leaf is a dark green color, which contrasts with the lighter color on the underside of the leaf. They are elongated and have serrated edges. The surfaces of the leaves are covered in secreting hairs which are more prevalent on the underside.

The male plant has a flower head which produces pollen, while flowers in female plants are much smaller and contain the sheathed ovaries in green-colored bracts.

They aren’t pollinized by insects; rather this process is performed aerially. The male plant dies shortly after having spread its pollen, while the female stays alive until the seeds have matured or until it becomes a victim of low temperatures.

The seeds will then remain in the humus until the adequate climate conditions for their development reappear.

Cannabis is a very resilient plant that tolerates weather change quite well, except for freezing temperatures. Its seeds can grow in many different types of soil and climate conditions, apart from it requiring very little attention or care once it’s properly rooted.

The psychoactive substances known as cannabinoids are present in the majority of the plant, including the leaves and flowers; however they are highly concentrated in the plant’s resin or hashish, a substance produced by the glands on the base of the thin layer covering the leaves and particularly in the bracts of the flower heads of female plants.

This resin can act as a natural varnish, covering the leaves and the stems in order to protect them from drying out when in high

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πŸ“°︎ r/trees
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Darthslab
πŸ“…︎ May 17 2021
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Resources on cannabis flower anatomy/development?

This sub needs more resources on how buds develop after pollination, as well as the general anatomy of the bud (bracts, calyx, pistil, seed pods etc).

It’s my first time breeding and I honestly could barely find any resources on the basic structure and development of buds/seeds. I mean, what the hell am I supposed to look for?

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πŸ“°︎ r/cannabisbreeding
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Funnybuilding
πŸ“…︎ Dec 11 2020
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Genetics 101: What You Need to Know about Breeding Cannabis

As Wavy Flower Company continues to dive further into getting new genetics out to the world, we are starting to learn that most people do not know how the genetics are created in the first place. We are here to spread the knowledge and information that we have learned along the way. The Cannabis Industry is full of differing information, but here it is, according to breeders doing it currently!

Let’s say you want to create a new, superior cultivar. We are going to walk you through the steps to making your own, and what it takes, along with the time tables. There is a false notion that genetics are created fairly quickly, when it can take up to a year to find something worth breeding. We have heard of some people spending years on their genetics to make sure that structure, yield, and genetics are stable.

In order to make a simple cross, you need a female of one cultivar, and a male of another cultivar. From seed, it can take 30–45 days to learn the sex of the plant, as long as it is not topped. In order to tell if the plant is female, you need to look for white pistils protruding from a bract (calyx called by some). The bract will be pointy. To see if it is a male, it will have a growth protruding off of the bract, similar to a mini stem. The bract will be round, and will start to show multiple clusters.

After you find both a male and female, make sure to put them together in a very secluded area. We are currently pollinating in a tent, in a separate room from our veg room, which is sealed off. We still need to be careful of cross-contamination at all times. Male cannabis plants are known to pollinate as far as a mile when put outside, so if you have any other plants inside, they can be goners. The plants are put together for 3–4 weeks, where you can make sure the female gets pollinated. You can tell the female is pollinated because the pistils will shrink, shrivel and crinkle, instead of being spread out and straight. You can also visibly see the pollen, which looks like a yellowish-tinted powder.

After the plant is pollinated, you remove the male, and let the female do their work on producing seeds. You will start to see them pretty quickly, and may even see the seeds forming during the pollination period. The seeds will be growing inside of the bract, which most breeders will call a β€œseed pod”. It takes approximately 6–7 weeks for seeds to mature. The seeds will be popping out of the top of the buds, with plenty of seeds throughout the buds as we

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πŸ“°︎ r/Marijuana
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πŸ‘€︎ u/wavyflowerco
πŸ“…︎ May 10 2021
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The Hazel, Part 1; Catkins

The Hazel, Corylus avellana, has smooth, silvery bark, brilliant green, downy leaves, and early in the year forms bright yellow Catkins which dangle and sway in the wind giving a welcome hint of spring yellow to the otherwise barren hedges and trees of winter.

It is particularly quick out of the blocks compared to other native plants because its catkins are formed the previous year and are ready to open as soon as conditions are right, braving the cold winds in January and February when other plants are still asleep. It has evolved this strategy of early flowering because it is a plant of the underwoods and needs to getaway to a good start before taller trees put out their leaves and shade the forest floor.

The Catkins appear before its leaves and are like little decorative tassels in the way they hang down, they are usually pale marzipan yellow or lighter in colour. These catkins produce and release pollen on to the wind on warmer days over a few weeks and open before the leaves in order to maximise the pollen’s exposure to the wind, although they are only a couple of centimetres long they can each hold up to 240 individual blooms.

Both the male and female flowers are of great beauty and found on the same tree although they will open weeks apart on adjacent trees, this is to encourage fertilisation of neighbouring trees and not themselves. The female flowers are to be found along the same twigs but are usually lower on the twig, this is to allow the pollen to drift down on to them, they are very tiny too, just a few millimetres long, so to the naked eye they are barely visible, just a pink blur on a small green bud, close in against the branch. By using a magnifying glass, however, you can pick out exquisitely delicate red tendrils, these are styles, as there are no petals.

The Hazel has no need for petals, because petals are a device to attract pollinating insects, and the Hazel is wind-pollinated so has no need of them. This doesn’t mean that pollinating insects don’t visit them, in fact they can be very popular with bees and will often be their only source of food if they emerge too early in the year.

The Hazel only grows to about 8 metres tall at the most which

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πŸ“°︎ r/RibbleValley
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Albertjweasel
πŸ“…︎ Feb 28 2021
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Interesting Read: The Fertilizer Revolution

The following was originally published the Journal of the Bromeliad Society Volume 46 Issue 6 (Nov-Dec 1996). The original article (including figures) can be found on page 252 here.

The Fertilizer Revolution

By Herb Plever

To grow properly, all plants need to accumulate various mineral nutrients. In their natural habitats bromeliad terrestrials utilize nutrients absorbed from the ground, and both terrestrials and rosette-type epiphytes feed from animal droppings and decayed vegetable and animal matter in their leaf axils. In nature, only small amounts of nutrients are available to the silver/grey, epiphytic tillandsias as they do not have water reservoirs. However, their heavy trichome coating enables them to make very efficient use of the mineral ions floating in the mists which daily bathe them.

It is obvious that without help bromels grown in the greenhouse or indoors cannot accumuLate a sufficient range and quantity of mineral nutrients necessary for vigorous growth. Yet, in every one of the many books and articles on bromeliad culture that have been written, the unanimous advice is to restrict fertilizer strength to from 25% to 50% of the dosage recommended on the package (usually 1/4 to 1/2 tsp. to a gallon of water), and to fertilize once a month only during the β€˜growing season”. Growers are cautioned to minimize even this moderate dosage and the frequency of application unless strong light is available to the plants, and no distinction is made between different genera.

For about 15 years, however, a high-strength fertilizer revolution has been conducted in relative secrecy by large numbers of commercial growers, perhaps spurred by the nutrition research of Dr. David H. Benzing as reported in his The Biology ofthe Brorneliads (Mad River Press, 1980, now regrettably out of print). Even at this moment most brorneliad hobbyists are unaware of the existence of this important change in horticulture. My use of the word β€œrevolution” is apt in the sense that these commercial fertilizer practices are a radical departure from the usual, traditional views on providing nutrients to plants. As Dr. Benzing puts it (page 81): β€œRegardless of their adaptations, most wild plants experience some nutritional distress. For one or more reasons, they are unable to accumulate one or more of the essential elements to realize maximum growth potential.. Almost all cultured plants will grow faster and larger if g

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πŸ“°︎ r/airplants
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πŸ‘€︎ u/tillandsiatrades
πŸ“…︎ Apr 04 2020
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Your thoughts on this really old post by SpruceZeus on Harvesting/Marijuana Ripeness.

Hey Guys, I found this really interesting post about Harvesting on Rollitup forum, from a decade ago.

It seems really interesting. #What is this community's thoughts on this? Is this a correct approach?

https://www.rollitup.org/t/zeuss-take-on-harvesting.210501/

Here is the post -

##Is it ready yet?: SpruceZeus's take on marijuana ripeness.

This is by no means meant to be the definitive guide to knowing when to chop your plant, only my views on the subject.

I'm personally of the opinion that 90% of the growers on this site (And probably in general) harvest too early. By letting the plants go a little longer you're ensuring that the've plumped as much as they're going to. Despite popular opinion to the contrary(and don't fool yourself, the jury is still out on this one)

  • Recent studies have shown ;contrary to what was previously believed, that THC itself (And its predecessor THC-A) are quite guilty of causing the confusion and drowsiness associated with burnout and other cannabinoids (our friend CBN, and a handful of others) are the catalyst (along with THC) to being 'high' rather than 'baked'

Regardless, whether or not there is any substance to the aforementioned study, it is easy to get the high you want.

If you want a soaring 'cerebral' high: Get yourself a tropical sativa that contains a high level of THC-V and grow it until it is ripe. If you want the narcotic couchlock stone, grow a rugged indica until its ripe. Notice a pattern of growing it until its ripe? Its a really good rule to live by. OF course we have to remember that there is more to a good high than just THC. At last count there are at least 66 cannabinoids, and we don't know what most of them do.

Now alot of people will tell you that you should harvest based on the colour of your trichomes. But (again, in my opinion) that is far too simplistic and there are too many variables to make that an effective strategy. I've made that point a million times before and i'm not going to re-hash it here,(maybe just a bit) but rest assured there is more to the picture than just trich colour.

A ripe marijuana plant will be filled in, will have an amber tinge to the buds. The pistils should have browned (or orange-d) off and receded into the buds. The seed bracts should be swollen and the trichomes should be sticking straight out with bulbous ends. Also, because you're coming close to the end of plant's life cycle, the leaves should have yellowed off and started to die.

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πŸ“°︎ r/microgrowery
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πŸ‘€︎ u/uber4saul
πŸ“…︎ Apr 12 2020
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What does 'limb minute', 'petal minute' mean in botany

I'm reading some botany books and came across these strange terms. I get the feeling that they mean small limb and small petal, but 'limb' and 'petal' being singular confuses me. Being quite new to gardening, botany, flowers, etc. I want to make sure it doesn't have some other sort of meaning. It seems like 'minute' is part of the lexicon of gardening as I see it in many similar books. Also, is there some sort of a significance of 'limb minute', 'petal minute', 'bract minute'...?

'Limb' is defined in Oxford dictionaries as: The blade or broad part of a leaf or petal OR The spreading upper part of a tube-shaped flower (the latter definition which I don't really understand, cannot picture, and cannot find it it on google). How do I know what limb the writing is referring to?

Excerpt from the text: "Cal. adnate with the ovary, limb minute. Pet. minute, from the throat of the calyx or O. Stam. 1---8 inserted with the petals. Ovary of 1 or more cells. Style 0. Stigmas equal in number to the cells..."

https://preview.redd.it/6ubhnl529sv01.png?width=434&format=png&auto=webp&s=39d893505e0ce329da0307ab5bd593cef474488a

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πŸ“°︎ r/botany
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πŸ‘€︎ u/JlH00n
πŸ“…︎ May 04 2018
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Any interest in a glossary?

I'm putting off doing homework and I didn't find anything for "terms", "terminology" or "dictionary" on this sub, so I thought maybe I'd start us off?

Herbaceous vs. Woody -- Plants are either woody (stems and branches are hard to break, possesses dry outer layers, brown to gray etc etc) or herbaceous (cell walls are easily broken, releasing fluid; typically green, etc).

Petal-- Petals are modified leaves, typically of a different color than the rest of the plant, meant to attract pollinators to the sexual organs of the plant.

Corolla-- All the petals together are called the "corolla".

Sepal-- Sepals are leaves that typically enclose and protect the petals before the flower opens. Sepals can be sneaky -- for example, a lily has six "petals", but three of them are secretly colored sepals.

Calyx-- All the sepals together are called the calyx.

Stamen-- The male organs of the flower. They hold pollen on their tips ("anthers"). Their stem-like portion is called the filament. Because some plants are male and female, not all flowers will have stamens.

Pistil-- The female organ of the flower, right in the center and often forked or even split into three or more at the tip. These develop into the fruits and seeds of a plant. Those terms are also different botanically than in common speech -- for example, the shell of a sunflower seed is considered the sunflower's "fruit". Botanists are a strange bunch, apparently. Again, some flowers do not have pistils.

Node-- Anywhere a leaf comes out of the stem of the plant.

Opposite vs. Alternate-- When a plant's leaves are opposite, two leaves come out at each node on the stem, directly across from one another (typical in many families). If they're alternate, only one leaf comes out at each point on the stem (also pretty common, for example in the onion family). This is the one to know!

Simple vs. Compound-- Simple leaves have only one blade (the name for what we think of as the leaf... like, as opposed to its stem). Compound leaves have multiple leaflets.

Palmate vs. Pinnate-- These are two types of compound leaves. Palmate, like your palm, means that all the leaflets come together in the center (well okay it's more like fingers, but you know). Pinnate is named for the word "feather", because it means that leaflets form that pattern, across from each other up the stem of the leaf. Plants from the pea family are conspicuously pinnate. Buckeyes are palmate.

Toothed vs. Entire-- Toothed leaves have jagged edges t

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πŸ“°︎ r/foraging
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πŸ‘€︎ u/captainlavender
πŸ“…︎ Dec 06 2016
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Awareness & Healthy Skepticism - Thwarting Myth (Re: Farmers Market - Humboldt Style)

As cultivators we must be knowledgeable to achieve positive effect. Myth is the antithesis to our aims. In the cannabis cultivation community myth has lead to such practices and results such as: dangerous pesticides use, lost and contaminated gene pools, financial loss, water pollution, increased plastic wastes, short-sighted legislation, and energy overconsumption, among others.

For every myth we carry forward, there is a negative outcome which lands at someone's feet at some time. Whether it's your buddy telling you its fine to spray Eagle 20 on the crop, or the local budtender telling an older woman she'll be "In Da Couch", these myths disempower and cripple us.

True knowledge on the other hand empowers and liberates us. And that's what I'm here to talk about today. I wish to share with you a story and an example of why it is necessary to exercise healthy skepticism. It is necessary for us to listen intently, and to think of what we hear, and to ask ourselves and others the questions we invoke from our wonder.

Future Cannabis Project recently uploaded an interesting video titled, "Farmers Market - Humboldt Style": https://youtu.be/WPnqdIonZ8Q

In the video, cultivators stand around and speak idly. It is merely a candid conversation piece, ripe for perusal for the cultivator who wishes to extract the seldom-spoken and rarely written hints and tips which other veteran growers may have learned. I began the video excited to potentially learn of localized (Humboldt) grower traditions and history, strain lineages and breeding regimes, terpene profiles, current events, new products, etc. To hear professional cultivators from another part of the world share their perspective is invaluable.

Being a rather recent video, in the discussion below, one comment stood out:
"Why are they talking to these lying posers again? Should have let the woman talk the whole time. She's brilliant. These guys make me cringe they so full of it. Wolves in sheep's clothing."

The reality of the situation, however, was quite the opposite. This "brilliant" woman is Tina Gordon of Moon Made Farms. She's clearly an all-around lovely and talented person with a captivating voice and a commanding presence. But her knowledge of cultivation lacks. Despite this, and surprisingly, she spoke very authoritatively. And there was the result: a commenter who thought she a was brilliant cultivator.

This individual specifically requested that Future Cannabis Project should feature her more

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πŸ‘€︎ u/7_trees
πŸ“…︎ Feb 01 2020
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Murdaath. Son of Mithras. Part Two.

Part 1:
https://www.reddit.com/r/libraryofshadows/comments/4ijiy6/murdaath_son_of_mithras_part_1/

 


 

A kingly calm would come to be the expected demeanour of Murdaath from those days onward.

 

Though none of his disciples and servants would ever see him in a state of fury ; like he had been that day he murdered Arzghaal in blood and darkness, though his sword would still see action, he would never let his emotions control him again in such a way.

 

At thirty three, Murdaath had united the monkeys of a thousand tribes, and ten million now called him king.

 

It was a sweltering African summer as he walked along the outskirts of the Gwana jungle with Pater Leonus, who still wore his horned bull-mask, and red tunic. Still Murdaath had never seen master Leonus' face, and yet he honoured him like a father.

 

'The construction of the temples in Phraxos goes well master. What is the next stage of expansion?' Asked the young king, 'Do we draw up another 3 year plan with the brotherhood?'

 

Pater Leonus moved slowly over towards a curious spherical plant with many writhing tendrils. Murdaath followed him and stared at the plant, questioning his masters silence.

 

'All things are known in time' said Pater Leonus cryptically, then he reached out and touched one of the shivering tendrils with his gloved hand. Gently, Master Leonus plucked the ripened bud and held it in his outstretched hand. 'Do you know what this bud is Murdaath?'

 

Murdaath took the bud from Pater Leonus' hand unquestioningly, then replied, 'I know all the plant species of Gondwanaland master. Just as the Kamu have taught me. This is a miniature Hakea, an ancestor of the giant spherical bounties that border the hashlands, it is of the Proteaceae family, like the banksia. This particular species feeds on emotion of local fauna, like other plants absorb carbon dioxide.'

 

'Ahhh. Yes.' Master Leonus replied, 'For facts you are quite advanced child of the sun. But you are not yet truly wise. Tell me young Murdaath, what do you really know of plants. What really differentiates flora and fauna?'

 

'Differentiates master?' Murdaath asked quizzically, 'Why, there are many differences. In single celled organisms we share some common lineage with our floral brothers and sisters. But it is our epidermis, our brains and blood. Consciousness above all

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 6
πŸ“°︎ r/libraryofshadows
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/GoityePowerhouse
πŸ“…︎ May 09 2016
🚨︎ report
Common Types of Mold Found in Hemp Plants

Hope you guys are getting your week off to a great start! Here is some information on the different types of mold found in hemp plants.

Gray Mold - The fungus, Botrytis cinerea (teleomorph: Botryotinia fuckeliana), is an opportunistic pathogen that easily invades weak, damaged, or senescing tissue. This fungus is very common in the Pacific Northwest and occurs worldwide in greenhouses. Cannabis can be killed within one week. Spores (conidia) are produced throughout the growing season under a wide range of temperatures and humidity; and stem infections are a durable inoculum source, producing conidia throughout bloom. Cool temperatures (68Β°F is optimal but the fungus can grow between 50Β° and 80Β°F), high humidity, and free water on plant surfaces favor the disease, as do close plant spacing and irrigation practices that keep plants wet for a longer time. Durable sclerotia overwinter in soil.

Symptoms The pathogen causes brown, water-soaked spots on buds or chlorotic areas on stems. Buds eventually rot producing a gray-brown mass of spores; infections start within buds. Botrytis cankers develop to the point of limb breakage or stem splitting, especially if plant canopies are dense and heavy. Small, black sclerotia can develop within stem tissues. Like the buds, cankers produce gray-brown masses of spores. Seedlings can also be killed.

Cultural control

  • Limit irrigation during and after bloom. Irrigate in the morning so plants do not stay wet more than 12 hours.
  • In greenhouses, maintain the relative humidity below 50%, temperatures warm, and high light intensity. Filtering out UV light may prevent epidemics since sporulation requires UV light.
  • Avoid over-fertilization with nitrogen.
  • Canopy management is the best preventive method.

Powdery Mildew - Is caused by a fungus, Podosphaera macularis (formerly Sphaerotheca humuli) or Golovinomyces (Erysiphe) cichoracearum. Although P. macularis also is reported on hop, strawberry, and caneberries, races that attack hemp are probably limited to Cannabis. How these pathogens overwinter in the Pacific Northwest is unknown.

Symptoms Infections on susceptible leaves appear as whitish, powdery spots on either the upper or lower leaf surface. Entire leaf surfaces can be covered with powdery mildew and leaf petioles can also be infected as well as flower bracts. As powdery mildew patches age, ascocarps (small, nearly spherical fruiting bodies) may become visible as they turn from ye

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 17
πŸ“°︎ r/CBDhempBuds
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/FernValleyCBD
πŸ“…︎ Dec 14 2020
🚨︎ report
Common Types of Mold Found in Hemp Plants

Hope you guys are getting your week off to a great start! Here is some information on the different types of mold found in hemp plants.

Gray Mold - The fungus, Botrytis cinerea (teleomorph: Botryotinia fuckeliana), is an opportunistic pathogen that easily invades weak, damaged, or senescing tissue. This fungus is very common in the Pacific Northwest and occurs worldwide in greenhouses. Cannabis can be killed within one week. Spores (conidia) are produced throughout the growing season under a wide range of temperatures and humidity; and stem infections are a durable inoculum source, producing conidia throughout bloom. Cool temperatures (68Β°F is optimal but the fungus can grow between 50Β° and 80Β°F), high humidity, and free water on plant surfaces favor the disease, as do close plant spacing and irrigation practices that keep plants wet for a longer time. Durable sclerotia overwinter in soil.

Symptoms The pathogen causes brown, water-soaked spots on buds or chlorotic areas on stems. Buds eventually rot producing a gray-brown mass of spores; infections start within buds. Botrytis cankers develop to the point of limb breakage or stem splitting, especially if plant canopies are dense and heavy. Small, black sclerotia can develop within stem tissues. Like the buds, cankers produce gray-brown masses of spores. Seedlings can also be killed.

Cultural control

  • Limit irrigation during and after bloom. Irrigate in the morning so plants do not stay wet more than 12 hours.
  • In greenhouses, maintain the relative humidity below 50%, temperatures warm, and high light intensity. Filtering out UV light may prevent epidemics since sporulation requires UV light.
  • Avoid over-fertilization with nitrogen.
  • Canopy management is the best preventive method.

Powdery Mildew - Is caused by a fungus, Podosphaera macularis (formerly Sphaerotheca humuli) or Golovinomyces (Erysiphe) cichoracearum. Although P. macularis also is reported on hop, strawberry, and caneberries, races that attack hemp are probably limited to Cannabis. How these pathogens overwinter in the Pacific Northwest is unknown.

Symptoms Infections on susceptible leaves appear as whitish, powdery spots on either the upper or lower leaf surface. Entire leaf surfaces can be covered with powdery mildew and leaf petioles can also be infected as well as flower bracts. As powdery mildew patches age, ascocarps (small, nearly spherical fruiting bodies) may become visible as they turn from ye

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 27
πŸ“°︎ r/Marijuana
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/FernValleyCBD
πŸ“…︎ Dec 14 2020
🚨︎ report
Common Types of Mold Found in Hemp Plants

Hope you guys are getting your week off to a great start! Here is some information on the different types of mold found in hemp plants.

Gray Mold - The fungus, Botrytis cinerea (teleomorph: Botryotinia fuckeliana), is an opportunistic pathogen that easily invades weak, damaged, or senescing tissue. This fungus is very common in the Pacific Northwest and occurs worldwide in greenhouses. Cannabis can be killed within one week. Spores (conidia) are produced throughout the growing season under a wide range of temperatures and humidity; and stem infections are a durable inoculum source, producing conidia throughout bloom. Cool temperatures (68Β°F is optimal but the fungus can grow between 50Β° and 80Β°F), high humidity, and free water on plant surfaces favor the disease, as do close plant spacing and irrigation practices that keep plants wet for a longer time. Durable sclerotia overwinter in soil.

Symptoms The pathogen causes brown, water-soaked spots on buds or chlorotic areas on stems. Buds eventually rot producing a gray-brown mass of spores; infections start within buds. Botrytis cankers develop to the point of limb breakage or stem splitting, especially if plant canopies are dense and heavy. Small, black sclerotia can develop within stem tissues. Like the buds, cankers produce gray-brown masses of spores. Seedlings can also be killed.

Cultural control

  • Limit irrigation during and after bloom. Irrigate in the morning so plants do not stay wet more than 12 hours.
  • In greenhouses, maintain the relative humidity below 50%, temperatures warm, and high light intensity. Filtering out UV light may prevent epidemics since sporulation requires UV light.
  • Avoid over-fertilization with nitrogen.
  • Canopy management is the best preventive method.

Powdery Mildew - Is caused by a fungus, Podosphaera macularis (formerly Sphaerotheca humuli) or Golovinomyces (Erysiphe) cichoracearum. Although P. macularis also is reported on hop, strawberry, and caneberries, races that attack hemp are probably limited to Cannabis. How these pathogens overwinter in the Pacific Northwest is unknown.

Symptoms Infections on susceptible leaves appear as whitish, powdery spots on either the upper or lower leaf surface. Entire leaf surfaces can be covered with powdery mildew and leaf petioles can also be infected as well as flower bracts. As powdery mildew patches age, ascocarps (small, nearly spherical fruiting bodies) may become visible as they turn from ye

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 17
πŸ“°︎ r/cbdinfo
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/FernValleyCBD
πŸ“…︎ Dec 14 2020
🚨︎ report
Common Types of Mold Found in Hemp Plants

Hope you guys are getting your week off to a great start! Here is some information on the different types of mold found in hemp plants.

Gray Mold - The fungus, Botrytis cinerea (teleomorph: Botryotinia fuckeliana), is an opportunistic pathogen that easily invades weak, damaged, or senescing tissue. This fungus is very common in the Pacific Northwest and occurs worldwide in greenhouses. Cannabis can be killed within one week. Spores (conidia) are produced throughout the growing season under a wide range of temperatures and humidity; and stem infections are a durable inoculum source, producing conidia throughout bloom. Cool temperatures (68Β°F is optimal but the fungus can grow between 50Β° and 80Β°F), high humidity, and free water on plant surfaces favor the disease, as do close plant spacing and irrigation practices that keep plants wet for a longer time. Durable sclerotia overwinter in soil.

Symptoms The pathogen causes brown, water-soaked spots on buds or chlorotic areas on stems. Buds eventually rot producing a gray-brown mass of spores; infections start within buds. Botrytis cankers develop to the point of limb breakage or stem splitting, especially if plant canopies are dense and heavy. Small, black sclerotia can develop within stem tissues. Like the buds, cankers produce gray-brown masses of spores. Seedlings can also be killed.

Cultural control

  • Limit irrigation during and after bloom. Irrigate in the morning so plants do not stay wet more than 12 hours.
  • In greenhouses, maintain the relative humidity below 50%, temperatures warm, and high light intensity. Filtering out UV light may prevent epidemics since sporulation requires UV light.
  • Avoid over-fertilization with nitrogen.
  • Canopy management is the best preventive method.

Powdery Mildew - Is caused by a fungus, Podosphaera macularis (formerly Sphaerotheca humuli) or Golovinomyces (Erysiphe) cichoracearum. Although P. macularis also is reported on hop, strawberry, and caneberries, races that attack hemp are probably limited to Cannabis. How these pathogens overwinter in the Pacific Northwest is unknown.

Symptoms Infections on susceptible leaves appear as whitish, powdery spots on either the upper or lower leaf surface. Entire leaf surfaces can be covered with powdery mildew and leaf petioles can also be infected as well as flower bracts. As powdery mildew patches age, ascocarps (small, nearly spherical fruiting bodies) may become visible as they turn fro

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 6
πŸ“°︎ r/besthempflower
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/FernValleyCBD
πŸ“…︎ Dec 14 2020
🚨︎ report
Common Types of Mold Found in Hemp Plants

Hope you guys are getting your week off to a great start! Here is some information on the different types of mold found in hemp plants.

Gray Mold - The fungus, Botrytis cinerea (teleomorph: Botryotinia fuckeliana), is an opportunistic pathogen that easily invades weak, damaged, or senescing tissue. This fungus is very common in the Pacific Northwest and occurs worldwide in greenhouses. Cannabis can be killed within one week. Spores (conidia) are produced throughout the growing season under a wide range of temperatures and humidity; and stem infections are a durable inoculum source, producing conidia throughout bloom. Cool temperatures (68Β°F is optimal but the fungus can grow between 50Β° and 80Β°F), high humidity, and free water on plant surfaces favor the disease, as do close plant spacing and irrigation practices that keep plants wet for a longer time. Durable sclerotia overwinter in soil.

Symptoms The pathogen causes brown, water-soaked spots on buds or chlorotic areas on stems. Buds eventually rot producing a gray-brown mass of spores; infections start within buds. Botrytis cankers develop to the point of limb breakage or stem splitting, especially if plant canopies are dense and heavy. Small, black sclerotia can develop within stem tissues. Like the buds, cankers produce gray-brown masses of spores. Seedlings can also be killed.

Cultural control

  • Limit irrigation during and after bloom. Irrigate in the morning so plants do not stay wet more than 12 hours.
  • In greenhouses, maintain the relative humidity below 50%, temperatures warm, and high light intensity. Filtering out UV light may prevent epidemics since sporulation requires UV light.
  • Avoid over-fertilization with nitrogen.
  • Canopy management is the best preventive method.

Powdery Mildew - Is caused by a fungus, Podosphaera macularis (formerly Sphaerotheca humuli) or Golovinomyces (Erysiphe) cichoracearum. Although P. macularis also is reported on hop, strawberry, and caneberries, races that attack hemp are probably limited to Cannabis. How these pathogens overwinter in the Pacific Northwest is unknown.

Symptoms Infections on susceptible leaves appear as whitish, powdery spots on either the upper or lower leaf surface. Entire leaf surfaces can be covered with powdery mildew and leaf petioles can also be infected as well as flower bracts. As powdery mildew patches age, ascocarps (small, nearly spherical fruiting bodies) may become visible as they turn from ye

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 6
πŸ“°︎ r/CBDOilReviews
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/FernValleyCBD
πŸ“…︎ Dec 14 2020
🚨︎ report
Common Types of Mold Found in Hemp Plants

Hope you guys are getting your week off to a great start! Here is some information on the different types of mold found in hemp plants.

Gray Mold - The fungus, Botrytis cinerea (teleomorph: Botryotinia fuckeliana), is an opportunistic pathogen that easily invades weak, damaged, or senescing tissue. This fungus is very common in the Pacific Northwest and occurs worldwide in greenhouses. Cannabis can be killed within one week. Spores (conidia) are produced throughout the growing season under a wide range of temperatures and humidity; and stem infections are a durable inoculum source, producing conidia throughout bloom. Cool temperatures (68Β°F is optimal but the fungus can grow between 50Β° and 80Β°F), high humidity, and free water on plant surfaces favor the disease, as do close plant spacing and irrigation practices that keep plants wet for a longer time. Durable sclerotia overwinter in soil.

Symptoms The pathogen causes brown, water-soaked spots on buds or chlorotic areas on stems. Buds eventually rot producing a gray-brown mass of spores; infections start within buds. Botrytis cankers develop to the point of limb breakage or stem splitting, especially if plant canopies are dense and heavy. Small, black sclerotia can develop within stem tissues. Like the buds, cankers produce gray-brown masses of spores. Seedlings can also be killed.

Cultural control

  • Limit irrigation during and after bloom. Irrigate in the morning so plants do not stay wet more than 12 hours.
  • In greenhouses, maintain the relative humidity below 50%, temperatures warm, and high light intensity. Filtering out UV light may prevent epidemics since sporulation requires UV light.
  • Avoid over-fertilization with nitrogen.
  • Canopy management is the best preventive method.

Powdery Mildew - Is caused by a fungus, Podosphaera macularis (formerly Sphaerotheca humuli) or Golovinomyces (Erysiphe) cichoracearum. Although P. macularis also is reported on hop, strawberry, and caneberries, races that attack hemp are probably limited to Cannabis. How these pathogens overwinter in the Pacific Northwest is unknown.

Symptoms Infections on susceptible leaves appear as whitish, powdery spots on either the upper or lower leaf surface. Entire leaf surfaces can be covered with powdery mildew and leaf petioles can also be infected as well as flower bracts. As powdery mildew patches age, ascocarps (small, nearly spherical fruiting bodies) may become visible as they turn from ye

... keep reading on reddit ➑

πŸ‘︎ 3
πŸ“°︎ r/weed
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/FernValleyCBD
πŸ“…︎ Dec 14 2020
🚨︎ report

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