Visa policy of the Schengen Area [1422 × 930]
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📰︎ r/MapPorn
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👤︎ u/Mizu3
📅︎ Aug 11 2017
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u/vernazza's unnecessarily long guide to Budapest

Free 30+ page travel guide about Budapest, Hungary and bits of Central Europe. Enjoy!

Information correct as of summer 2020. If you find anything incorrect or would like to make requests, suggestions (or just want to say hi), please do that here! You should also drop by in /r/budapest to see past questions and to get advice from multiple people.

I would also greatly appreciate your post-trip feedbacks about whether my recommendations worked out for you or not! Restaurants, clubs can undergo radical changes and it's not always possible to keep track of every single one.

The local charity I support is the Hungarian Food Bank Association. For every €1 donated they are able to save €30 worth of perishable food and have it reach underprivileged Hungarian families. If you find this guide useful, please consider donating to them!

Some links use URL-shorteners, so I could track how many of you are using this guide. Nothing fishy waiting for you behind them.

See my suggestions in the comments below about:

===CORONA RESTRICTIONS===

The situation is subject to change momentarily, this information is current as of September 2020. Eastern Europe as a whole has largely been spared from the worst of it, including Hungary, and the risk of transmission is low.

Presently foreigners are banned from entry altogether. Exceptions are in place for people with ties to the country (family members, studies, work, those holding residence permits), and people transiting by car on designated highways.

The situation will be revised monthly, with experts saying the second peak is expected for December-January.

In the country, you need to wear a mask on public transport, inside shops, malls, cinemas, museums. You don't need to wear them inside restaurants, cafes, bars, but they must close by 23.00. Social distancing rules are in plac

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📰︎ r/hungary
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👤︎ u/vernazza
📅︎ Apr 06 2018
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Weird loophole in Schengen Visa Policy?

I was browsing the Wikipedia page describing the visa policy of the Schengen Area, and noticed something that seemed really weird to me:

>In addition, above the framework of the Schengen visa exemption of 90 days in any 180-day period, Argentine, Chilean, Costa Rican, Israeli, Malaysian, South Korean and Uruguayan citizens are permitted to spend an extra 3 months per 6-month period visa-free in the Czech Republic,[51] regardless of time spent in other Schengen countries.[52] Similarly, above the framework of the Schengen visa exemption of 90 days in any 180-day period, Australian, Brazilian, Canadian, Chilean, Israeli, Japanese, Malaysian, Singaporean, South Korean and United States citizens are permitted to spend an extra period of 90 days visa-free in Denmark.[53][54] Again, above the framework of the Schengen visa exemption of 90 days in any 180-day period, Israeli, South Korean and United States citizens are permitted to spend an extra peri**od of 90 days visa-free in Poland.[55]

From what I understood, it means that Israelis can basically move to Europe visa-free. If they stay in Denmark/Poland/Czech Republic, they can basically live there w/o any kind of bureaucracy/authorization at all. Where am I wrong?

It may be worth noting that this is merely a thought exercise; even though I like and have enjoyed in your continent/union/country a lot, I really do enjoy living in Israel for the time being ;) It just seems really weird to me, and I couldn't find any expert on the subject here. Maybe one you guys is an expert in EU immigration laws?

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📰︎ r/AskEurope
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👤︎ u/tahtokak
📅︎ Jun 03 2018
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[DIPLOMACY] ECJ Session: UK-Cyprus Visa Agreement

The United Kingdom and Cyprus have illegally signed an agreement in which Cyprus has granted visa-exempt status to the United Kingdom.

As per the Visa Policy of the Schengen Area, if a nation wishes to travel to any Schengen Area nation, Cyprus, Bulgaria, or Romania, then they must obtain a visa or be from a visa-exempt nation. The UK is not a visa-exempt nation, and for a nation to obtain visa-exempt status, it must pass through the EU legislature.

The UK-Cyprus agreement has not passed through any such legislature, and both countries have refused to cooperate and drop the term.

Therefore, we are bringing this before the European Court of Justice to vote on whether or not the agreement constitutes a violation of EU statutes, given this was the insistence of the UK.

It's fairly clear cut. To have visa-exempt status with the EU or an EU member state, you need to negotiate with the whole EU. The UK did no such thing. Therefore, the agreement is invalid.

[M] Just cast your judge's vote as you would for a regular EU vote type deal.

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👤︎ u/_Irk
📅︎ Mar 20 2017
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[DIPLOMACY][NPC] Cyprus Calls for EU Action over Visa Reciprocity Concerns

Governed under European Union regulations, the Schengen Area has a unified visa policy for short-stay visa. This common list of who does or does not require a visa is applied not only to Schengen member states, but also to all other EU members (except the countries of the British Isles) — namely: Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, and Romania.

Part of this regulatory arrangement is a requirement for reciprocity: If citizens of a third country are granted visa-free travel rights to the EU/Schengen zone, it's expected that EU/Schengen nationals will also receive that level of access when travelling to that third country.

Not all countries are able to immediately grant reciprocity for all member states, especially frequently affecting the aforementioned non-Schengen EU members. The affected states and the European Commission have often been lenient and allowed time for this to be implemented, and in almost all cases this has worked. Notably, visa reciprocity disputes with Canada nearly held up the signing of CETA in 2017, resulting in Canada quickly lifting the restrictions.

There is however one particularly tenacious partner country who has denied the required reciprocity rights for Bulgarian, Croatian, Cypriot, Polish and Romanian citizens for nearly a decade: The United States of America

These five countries have been excluded from the American Visa Waiver Program since the beginning, stuck with delays in a scheme that clearly violates EU reciprocity rules by discriminating between EU member state citizens. The European Parliament has endorsed action in 2017 calling on the European Commission to enforce its own rules.
Now the issue has become particularly relevant again in the context of the ongoing Schengen Area expansion and EU-US trade dispute. The Republic of Cyprus is of the opinion, and sure that the other affected member states agree, that the Commission must act.

Regulatory procedure requires that the Commission re-initiates talks with the US government to lift requirem

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📅︎ Apr 03 2018
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More than 90 days as a tourist (Canadian)

Hi all,

I am a Canadian citizen and arrived in Germany on 1st May on a tourist visa (just stamp in passport). I have been staying here since and looking for a job (also traveling, visiting). I was under the impression that I could stay for up to 90 days (in a 180 period), then I could exit the Schengen area, and come back to start another 90 days. As my 90 days are coming fast, I am starting to second guess this.

I've looked around, in this sub (perhaps not with the right question?) and elsewhere, the rules are stated but are not so clear to me. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_the_Schengen_Area#Citizens_of_.27Annex_II.27_countries_and_territories Does it mean I have to wait for 6 months to pass since May 1st until I can return, or will the first "6 months" end on July 29th (or something like that) and the next one can start right away? I am a bit scared of going to the Ausländerbehörde to ask those questions, somehow afraid they might treat me as an attempted illegal immigrant.

Disclaimer, I was in Germany last year from November 22nd to December 8th 2016 on vacation. Not sure if this can affect the current situation.

If I do not find a job quickly, I do not plan to stay more than 5 months really. Even by the best outcome, with the speed of the interview processes in which I am taking part, I would not get a work visa before the end of my first 90 days. If I was to leave for a long weekend somewhere outside of Schengen in the next two weeks, would I be fine when I come back to Berlin?

Thanks!

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📰︎ r/germany
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📅︎ Jul 13 2017
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We might get visa-free access to Schengen area in the near future.

I was just reading stuff about schengen and learned that schengen countries are discussing about the possibility of indonesian to get visa free access to schengen area:

>Indonesia On 10 July 2015, Foreign minister of Indonesia, Retno Marsudi and European Commission Vice President, Frans Timmermans were met and talked about possibility for Indonesians passport holders to get a visa-free access to Schengen Area. It was noted that the visa rejection rate for Indonesian citizens is low at 1.1 percent in 2014 and immigration violation by Indonesian citizens is very low. Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Romania and Switzerland are some Schengen members who give their support for Indonesia to get a visa-free access to Schengen Area.

>During the sidelines of the EU-ASEAN ministerial meeting in Luxembourg on 5 November 2015, the European Commission has reportedly included Indonesia in a list of countries proposed for review by the European Council. Indonesia's proposal will be submitted to the council early next year. European Council then will ask three main entities (Frontex, Europol and EASO) to study and review Indonesia's eligibility. If the study results are positive then the Council and the European Commission will propose a new regulation regarding the status change of Indonesia to get Schengen visa waiver.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_the_Schengen_Area#Changes_in_the_last_5_years

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📰︎ r/indonesia
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👤︎ u/mvrofiq
📅︎ Feb 14 2016
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FWI: "Inspired" by the recent Turku stabbing, a wave of illegal immigrants commit crimes in Northern Europe, deciding that prison there is better than deportation home.

These crimes include robbery, rape, and even several murders. The attackers fit into two groups:

a) Maghreb and Sub-Saharan African migrants who have decided that spending a decade or more in a Northern European prison is better than returning home a free man (the Turku stabber was one of these)

and

b) People from visa-free countries to Schengen who make the same calculus (including many uninsured or underinsured, chronically ill people who buy plane tickets on credit and believe that they'll get better care in a European prison than home). These include Guatemalans, Hondurans, Brazilians, Peruvians, Americans, and many from the Pacific and Caribbean islands.

By mid-2018, on average of one major crime a day is being committed by such migrants in each of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, Germany, Austria, and the Netherlands.

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📅︎ Sep 10 2017
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Coronavirus Megathread (May 2021): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

While vaccines are starting to be administered in several countries, the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel, with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible. Accordingly, /r/travel is continue its megathreads on a monthly basis until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA or Kayak's travel restriction map. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, India, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, South Africa, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders, some family members of US citizens and permanent residents, and holders of certain visas (e.g. F-1 visas when traveling from the Schengen Area, and K-1 visas). Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history. Because of this, those traveling from one of the restricted countries are permitted to enter the US provided they spend the prior two weeks in a non-restricted country. More information about the entry restrictions and the associated proclamations is available on the US CDC website.

All air passengers (including US citizens and green card holders), regardless of origin and nationality, [need to produce a negative result](https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/testin

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📰︎ r/travel
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📅︎ May 01 2021
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Just arrived back in Canada after 6 months with fiancé in Sweden and I’m devastated

A really long self-indulgent vent because I’m devastatingly sad and don’t know where else to go atm. Apologies in advance

Currently in a government mandated hotel stay and missing my fiancé of 4+ years and the little life he and I created so intensely it’s like nothing else I’ve ever experienced!!

I was lucky to be able to extend my visitor visa to Sweden from the end of October until April 25th, and while that seemed like such a long time at the beginning it has gone by much faster than either of us anticipated! Everything was perfect, we’re very good at communicating (especially in the tiny apartment we shared), developed a good system to balance our work schedules and had a day-to-day life. I’m so fortunate that I got a job in September 2020 that is 100% online and they were okay with me being abroad while working Vancouver hours. It allowed us to test out living together for a longer period of time, and I think we fully passed. We both CANNOT WAIT to be finally married and live together forever!!

Although we wanted to stay together for as long as possible, especially in the face of COVID, it didn’t seem likely that I would be allowed to extend my visa a second time (the grounds for a visitor visa extension are basically someone is dying or there’s a global pandemic AND there are absolutely zero flights home for you) and that I may actually be deported with sanctions put against my visa that would make it difficult to travel to the Schengen area again. Definitely don’t want that!! So I chose a flight and jumped through all the hoops to plan an efficient and effective quarantine in Canada, but I feel so deeply empty and so, so sad like there’s a solid rock of grief in my body. It feels like I’m mourning a death instead of just being separated by an ocean. It’s the worst transition apart either of us have experienced so far, likely of course because we’ve been together so long this time.

COVID regulations are different in Sweden - as in, there aren’t that many. Here, there are strict policies and conditions in place which of course I understand, but it’s going to make the adjustment period that much harder. After a long drop off at the airport, my fiancé drove back to visit his mom and be comforted, and I’m so glad they were able to be together.

However, here in Canada we’re effectively under strict social distancing protocols, and as my family live in a different zone than I do, we can’t even see each other. Thinking about the two weeks of isola

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📰︎ r/LDR
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📅︎ Apr 25 2021
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New travel ban, F1 visa impacted?

Hello! Does someone know if the new travel ban signed by President Biden yesterday prevents to enter the US with a valid F1 visa? I don't know if the National Interest Exemption for F1 is still valid under this new order or not. I am planning to go back to Europe this Saturday and for 2 weeks but I am getting scared of not being able to come back. I am on OPT with a job letter offer.

I found conflicting info and don't know which one to believe.

On NYU international pages: NYU urges you to reconsider any personal international travel as well. The CDC recommends self-quarantine for up to 14 days following any international travel. Additionally, there is currently an entry ban for all non-citizens of the US (except lawful permanent residents and immediate family members of US citizens and lawful permanent residents) who have visited the listed countries. Please note: This entry ban is applied even to those with valid F-1 and J-1 visas.

On Berkeley's : Under prior COVID travel restrictions, the U.S. Department of State previously indicated(link is external) that F-1 students were allowed an automatic national interest exemption from the Schengen, UK, and Ireland travel ban, but that J-1 scholars or J-1 students would require an application for national interest exemption for approval for entry. It is unclear whether these exemptions will continue under current Department of State policy. Please check with your local consulate or embassy regarding whether a national interest exemption will be required for your entry.

Edit:

Update on Berkeley's https://internationaloffice.berkeley.edu/news/covid-travel-ban-updates-south-africa-uk-ireland-brazil-schengen-area:

" The Department of State confirmed that the prior "National Interest Exceptions for Certain Travelers from the Schengen Area, United Kingdom, and Ireland"(link is external)

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📰︎ r/f1visa
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👤︎ u/capri67
📅︎ Jan 26 2021
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The Portuguese Golden Visa 101

The Portuguese Golden Visa

​The rules governing the granting of Residence Permit for Investment (Golden Visa) enable third country nationals to obtain a temporary residence permit to live, work and study in Portugal. The application is done at SEF.

​The beneficiaries of the Portuguese Golden Visa residence permit are entitled to:

​Residence visa waiver for entering Portugal.

​Living and working in Portugal, on the condition that the investor and family members stay in Portugal for a period of at least 14 days after the Golden Visa was issued and within its validity.

​Visa exemption for traveling within the Schengen Area.

​Family reunification.

​Applying for a specific golden visa investor permanent residency​.

​Applying for Portuguese citizenship after 5 years of legal residence.

Eligibility – Who may apply?

​All third country citizens who conduct an investment activity, as an individual businessperson or through a company set up in Portugal and who fulfill the quantitative and qualitative requirements. They may apply for the Portuguese Golden Visa by one of the following routes:

​a) Capital transfer with a value equal to or above 1 million Euros.

b) The creation of, at least, 10 job positions.

c) The purchase of real estate property with a value equal to or above 500 thousand Euros.

d) The purchase of real estate property, with construction dating back more than 30 years or located in urban regeneration areas, for refurbishing, for a total value equal to or above 350 thousand Euros.

e) Capital transfer with a value equal to or above 350 thousand Euros for investing  in research activities conducted by public or private scientific research institutions involved in the national scientific or technological system.

f) [Capital transfer with a value equal to or above 250 thousand Euros for investing  in artistic output or supporting the arts, for reconstruction or refurbishment of the national heritage, through the local and central authoriti

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📰︎ r/u_a1l9e8x9
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👤︎ u/a1l9e8x9
📅︎ Mar 16 2021
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[Expansion] EAEU Summit - Expanding On The Common Market

##A Greatest Privilege

When one thinks of the economic conditions of the twenty-first century, many things may come to their mind. The adoption of the neoliberal consensus and outsourcing of jobs to low-wage developing nations. The expansion of free trade to a massive extent and the growing interconnectedness of the global economy. Deindustrialization and the formation of the information-based quaternary sector. All of these characterize our burgeoning new world, but just as significant as these phenomena is the arising of regional trade blocs and free trade areas. Agreements such as NAFTA, the EEC and later the EU, and now the EAEU, have created massive groups of economies ranging from zones of free trade to customs unions and single markets, all involving a total GDP measured in the trillions. We see that these groups are the future of mankind and the global market, hammering the nail in the coffin of the age of protectionism which traces its origins back to the medieval concept of mercantilism. Trade is not zero-sum. It is not something harmful or undesirable; it is indeed mutually beneficial to all parties if done sensibly.

Undeniably, there are scenarios and situations amongst the developing economies of Earth in which the precepts of market economics, whether free-market, neoliberal, or limited interventionist, do not fit: in particular, it has weaknesses in the development of industry in agrarian backwater countries which of themselves may not have much investment appeal. There are findings that indicate the power of a greater state control over the economy in the building of this crucial phase of such a nation. However, we can see from our very own experience the power of transformative market policies guided by state intervention and anti-corruption efforts in producing an untenable modern power from the ashes of an existing industrial base. It will thus be the synthesis of the velvet glove of state guidance and the innovative competition of capitalist enterprise that see all nations of the Eurasian Economic Union prosper and grow.

This attitude will drive us in our next set of proposals to reinforce the power and integration of the EAEU - namely, the strengthening of the Single Economic Space and the intertwining of every member state's economy using a new currency we will dub the "Altyn". These policies shall not only prompt development within individual member states, but shall work towards the goal of harmonizing and entangling the econom

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📰︎ r/Geosim
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👤︎ u/Eraevian
📅︎ Jan 13 2021
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10 Reasons for an Armenian Passport

1. Dual Citizenship Allowed

Armenia expressly allows dual citizenship.

2. Valuable Travel Document

As of 2020 Armenian passport ranks 60th in the world according to Arton Capital Passport Index, and 81st according to Henley & Partners Passport Index, and allows visa-free travel to 62 countries, including places with limited access to nationals of Western countries, such as Russia, Iran, Uzbekistan etc. The EU/Schengen countries still have a visa regime with Armenia but visa-free travel will likely become possible in a few years. The United States offer 10-year B visas to Armenian citizens as well as E-2 business visas.Russia, most of CIS countries, and Iran.

(Also Armenian passport is visa-free to China)

3. More Freedom and Options

Having a second passport gives you more freedom and options and can serve as a valuable "insurance policy." Armenia is generally considered an exceptionally safe country with one of the lowest crime rates in the world. If the economic or political situation in your country gets worse you can use your Armenian passport to temporarily or permanently move to Armenia with your family. Having a second passport can help you avoid problems resulting from your country’s foreign policy and domestic regulations (for example, difficulties with banking or increased tax burden). A second passport can be useful if you seek more privacy or if your first passport is expired, lost or confiscated. Also, you will need a second passport if you ever decide to renounce your current citizenship.

4. Citizenship Passes to Future Generations

Once you acquire Armenian citizenship your minor children can automatically get Armenian passports and your spouse may become eligible to apply for citizenship.  Under Armenian law a child born to an Armenian father or mother can easily acquire Armenian citizenship, irrespective of the place of birth or residence. In other words, your children and grandchildren will be able to get Armenian passports even if they do not reside in Armenia.

5. Preferential Treatment in Russia and Other EAEU Countries

Because of the free movement of labor in EAEU countries (Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Armenia) citizens of Armenia are exempted from work permit requirements and can take advantage of preferential treatment in areas of labor law, social protection, medical treatment, taxation, immigration etc.

6. Fast, Ea

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📰︎ r/armenia
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👤︎ u/musaler
📅︎ Jul 31 2020
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What are your thought of an idea of the North American Union? Please read the description below before answering.

The United States and Canada share so much more than a border. Both countries share a common culture of British and French colonisation, language and dialect, democratic values, customs etc. Canadians and Americans are almost identical to extend that we can't even recognise the difference. The Canadian and American economies are already significantly integrated as a result of NAFTA and other bilateral treaties, which have reduced, and in many cases eliminated, trade barriers.

However, there are better ways to foster a shared North American prosperity is by integrating our countries further and harmonising industries and practices so that the free flow of capital, people, and goods is entirely uninhabited. Essentially, this is a hypothesis regarding a European Union-style Single Market and border-free economic treaty, harmonising areas such as finance, energy, telecoms, infrastructure, environmental protection, agriculture and fisheries, and education. Our two countries have cooperated on these matters in the past, but this is a step beyond cooperation. This is an integration of policy and regulation, to ensure the US and Canada are adhering to the same, high standards to make people safe, healthy, and prosperous.

How would this work? Not easily, obviously. The first barrier, of course, is the will of the people or at least will of the political leaders (president, prime minister, congress, etc.) Is there an appetite for such a union between the two countries in which some sovereignty is ceded to the other, as well as an independent bi-national authority? With national ego-ism so fervent in North America, and the history of many Americans and Canadians aggressively opposing any international organisations which require members to cede authority of certain rights (think about the Trump-scepticism of NATO and the UN), chances of this happening are slim. However, this is merely the proposition of a theory, so we will avoid contemporary political realities for the moment.

The first area of integration would have to be the border. In order to create a Schengen-style border agreement, both the US and Canada need to agree on a system in which passport holders and permanent residents are guaranteed the ability to enter either country freely, so long as one can provide information regarding employment, education, or residence. No visa required. For example, if a Montanan manufacturer wants to move to British Columbia to work, all he/she need to have is proof of h

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📅︎ Nov 16 2019
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Coronavirus Resources

A few resources for Coronavirus-related study abroad questions are below. Please feel free to add other resources that may be helpful for folks in the comments!

Updates from ETS on Coronavirus and TOEFL/GRE testing: https://www.ets.org/s/cv/important-update/?WT.ac=toefl_cv_important_update_200301

These come from NAFSA - you can visit their webpage for new updates:

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👤︎ u/koryisma
📅︎ Mar 12 2020
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"Offene Grenzen"

Migration ist ein heißes Thema auf r/de. Nicht selten geht es dabei um “offene Grenzen”, und oft tatsächlich um eine Strohmann-Version davon. Darüber hinaus sind die allermeisten Argumente zu dem Thema komplett uninformiert. Das ist durchaus erwartbar - die realen Auswirkungen von verschiedenen Arten von Migration sind eines der Themen mit einem gigantischen Spalt zwischen Verständnis der Öffentlichkeit und tatsächlichen Forschungsergebnissen.

Deswegen habe ich diesen Post geschrieben, um etwas Klarheit zu bringen und einen umfassenden Case für die Idee von offenen Grenzen zu machen. Credits dabei an /u/sae-2, dessen Posts ich als Inspiration und Vorlage nehme.

Lasst mich vorher noch sagen, dass sich dieser Post fast ausschließlich mit den wirtschaftlichen und gesellschaftlichen Auswirkungen von offenen Grenzen beschäftigen wird, sprich mit der pur pragmatischen Ebene. Die moralische Ebene gibt es natürlich auch, aber auf ihr sehe ich keinen Diskussionsbedarf. Aus pur moralischer Sicht ist Freiheit immer besser als Unfreiheit. Aus pur moralischer Sicht ist Selbstbestimmung immer besser als Fremdbestimmung. Aus pur moralischer Sicht ist es grundsätzlich falsch, das Leben eines Menschen vom Zufall seiner Geburt abhängig zu machen, und ich sehe keine Möglichkeit für das Gegenteil zu argumentieren.

Da Freiheit für sich ein Selbstwert ist, ist jede Form von Migrationspolitik ein Tradeoff. Für jede Einschränkung von Offenheit für Migration müssen die daraus entstehenden Vorteile gegen die Einschränkung der individuellen Freiheit der Betroffenen abgewägt werden.

Nun denn, auf gehts!

Was sind offene Grenzen nicht?

Offene Grenzen bedeuten nicht:

> Al-Baghdadi, der Anführer von ISIS, streicht sich böse über den Bart während er eine völlig unmarkierte Grenze übertritt. > > Grenzposten: "Stopp, Terrorist! Wir wollen dich nicht in unserem Land!" > > Al-Baghdadi: "Aha! Aber was ihr wollt spielt keine Rolle. Hier habe ich eine Kopie der Wikipediaseite eures Landes, und auf ihr steht dass ihr “offene Grenzen” habt. Somit kann ich in euer Land kommen und ihr könnt nichts dagegen tun!" > > Grenzposten: "Verdammt, er hat Recht! Tja, dann müssen wir ihn wohl rein lassen." >

Aber im Ernst, dieses Beispiel ist offensichtlich übertrieben. Dennoch denken viele Menschen wenn sie “offene Grenzen” hören direkt an “keine Grenzen”. Viele stellen sich eine Situation vor, in der Migranten einfach über die Grenze laufen ohne jede Form von

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📰︎ r/de
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👤︎ u/Impulseps
📅︎ Oct 11 2018
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The Golden Visa Guide - Residency in Spain for Property Investors

There are several Golden Visa programs in Europe, but the Spanish one is arguably the most comprehensive and compelling option. Why? Well, I wrote the book about it, literally, and am happy to share it below in its entirety:

Foreword

Like many people, I have spent a great deal of my life wondering which place I would choose to live in if I could choose any place in the world. Criteria such as quality of life, cost of living, access to world-class healthcare, a great education for children, natural beauty and amazing food are usually on everyone’s list when considering new horizons and exciting adventures. Spain, and especially the coastal area known as the Costa Brava all the way down to the region’s capital city, Barcelona, has all of these desirable features and more.

As a natural-born EU citizen I had to right to pack up from my native Belgium and simply move down to what I consider paradise. But what if you’re not an EU citizen? Should you bury the dream of owning a rustic country estate or a luxury apartment, or indeed a beautiful villa on the coast? Should you abandon the idea of living in a relative stress- free society, rich with culture, culinary delights, and fascinating history?

Can you live in paradise too and come and go as you please? The answer is an emphatic yes,

YES, YOU CAN!

I hope this guide will help you weigh your options and set you on a path to ownership and residency in Spain.

Introduction

This is meant to be a guide for individuals, couples or families who are seeking to purchase property in Barcelona or the wider province of Catalunya. This book aims to provide a clear understanding of the obligations and conditions attached to purchasing a property and obtaining the coveted Golden Visas as the desired outcome after the purchase. While thorough and accurate at the time of writing, this guide is not a substitute for legal advice nor exhaustive in scope. If and when you are ready to set out on your own path to property ownership and residency rights in Spain, you are strongly encouraged to contact a qualified real estate agency and law firm within the desired jurisdiction.

Buying property abroad is an exciting prospect but the uncertainty surrounding rights, perks and obligations can be stressful and prohibitive. Conventional knowledge indicates that foreign buyers and prospective residents in a foreign country do not enjoy the same level of protection as provided to natural citizens, hence the understandable appreh

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Coronavirus Megathread (Apr 2021): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

While vaccines are starting to be administered in several countries, the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel, with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible. Accordingly, /r/travel is continue its megathreads on a monthly basis until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA or Kayak's travel restriction map. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, South Africa, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders as well as some family members of US citizens and permanent residents. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history. More information about the entry restrictions and the associated proclamations is available on the US CDC website.

All air passengers (including US citizens and green card holders), regardless of origin and nationality, need to produce a negative result from a viral test taken within 3 days of the first flight on a single ticket to the US. Alternatively, you may travel with a positive test result from the previous 3 months and a letter from a doctor indicating that you're clear for t

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Coronavirus Megathread (Mar 2021): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

While vaccines are starting to be administered in several countries, the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel, with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible. Accordingly, /r/travel is continue its megathreads on a monthly basis until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA or Kayak's travel restriction map. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, South Africa, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders as well as some family members of US citizens and permanent residents. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history. More information about the entry restrictions and the associated proclamations is available on the US CDC website.

All air passengers (including US citizens and green card holders), regardless of origin and nationality, need to produce a negative result from a viral test taken within 3 days of the first flight on a single ticket to the US. Alternatively, you may travel with a positive test result from the previous 3 months and a letter from a doctor indicating that you're clear for t

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Coronavirus Megathread (Feb 2021): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

While vaccines are starting to be administered in several countries, the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel, with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible. Accordingly, /r/travel is continue its megathreads on a monthly basis until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA, Kayak's travel restriction map, or this alternative site that draws information from IATA. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, South Africa, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history.

All air passengers (including US citizens and green card holders), regardless of origin and nationality, need to produce a negative result from a viral test taken within 3 days of the first flight on a single ticket to the US. Alternatively, you may travel with a positive test result from the previous 3 months and a letter from a doctor indicating that you're clear for travel. The land borders with Mexico and Canada are closed to all except those travelling for essential purposes, but [air, rail, and sea (but not commuter rail or ferry)

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Coronavirus Megathread (Jan 2021): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

Happy New Year! It's now 2021, and while vaccines are starting to be administered in several countries, the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel, with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible. Accordingly, /r/travel is continue its megathreads on a monthly basis until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA, Kayak's travel restriction map, or this alternative site that draws information from IATA. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Starting Jan. 30, foreign nationals will be prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via South Africa in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history.

All air passengers (including US citizens and green card holders), regardless of origin and nationality, need to produce a negative result from a viral test taken within 3 days of the first flight on a single ticket to the US.

The land borders with Mexico and Canada are closed to all except those travelling for essential purposes, but [air, rail, and

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Coronavirus Megathread (Late Dec 2020): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel – with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible – /r/travel is shifting to semi-monthly megathreads until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA, Kayak's travel restriction map, or this alternative site that draws information from IATA. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history. Starting Dec. 28, all passengers (including US citizens and green card holders) arriving from the UK will need to produce a negative result from a PCR or antigen test taken within 72 hours of departure.

The land borders with Mexico and Canada are closed to all except those travelling for essential purposes, but air, rail, and sea (but not commuter rail or ferry) ports-of-entry remain open to non-essential travel.

There are no quarantine-on-arrival requirements at the nationwide level, but individual states and/or cities may have their own requirements. You will need to confirm with information from your destination state or city. As an example, [this is New York State

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Coronavirus Megathread (Early Dec 2020): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel – with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible – /r/travel is shifting to semi-monthly megathreads until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA, Kayak's travel restriction map, or this alternative site that draws information from IATA. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history. The land borders with Mexico and Canada are closed to all except those travelling for essential purposes, but air, rail, and sea (but not commuter rail or ferry) ports-of-entry remain open to non-essential travel.

There are no quarantine-on-arrival requirements at the nationwide level, but individual states and/or cities may have their own requirements. You will need to confirm with information from your destination state or city. As an example, this is New York State's travel advisory/quarantine page; note that *travelers are permitted to break quarantine to leave New York State and the state's quarantine r

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Coronavirus Megathread III: For travel-related discussion as the COVID-19 situation moves forward

Please continue discussion in the new megathread [as of August 16].


The coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to move forward, with many now looking to understand when their travels might be feasible.

In the first virus megathread, the virus was just becoming well-known and starting to spread widely. In the second virus megathread, COVID-19 had achieved pandemic status and countries were rapidly implementing broad travel restrictions and lockdowns. Now, as countries begin to ease lockdowns and, in some cases, travel restrictions, the nature of frequently asked COVID-19-related questions has changed.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:


###Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine? A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA – or this alternative site that draws information from IATA. Note that this resource only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

####...in the US? At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history. The land borders with Mexico and Canada are closed to all except those travelling for essential purposes, but [air, rail, and sea (but not commute

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💬︎
📅︎ May 24 2020
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Coronavirus Megathread (Late Nov 2020): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel – with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible – /r/travel is shifting to semi-monthly megathreads until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA, Kayak's travel restriction map, or this alternative site that draws information from IATA. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history. The land borders with Mexico and Canada are closed to all except those travelling for essential purposes, but air, rail, and sea (but not commuter rail or ferry) ports-of-entry remain open to non-essential travel.

There are no quarantine-on-arrival requirements at the nationwide level, but individual states and/or cities may have their own requirements. You will need to confirm with information from your destination state or city. As an example, this is New York State's travel advisory/quarantine page; as you will discover there, *travelers are permitted to break quarantine to leave New York State and the st

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👍︎ 21
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📅︎ Nov 16 2020
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Coronavirus Megathread (Early Nov 2020): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel – with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible – /r/travel is shifting to semi-monthly megathreads until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA, Kayak's travel restriction map, or this alternative site that draws information from IATA. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history. The land borders with Mexico and Canada are closed to all except those travelling for essential purposes, but air, rail, and sea (but not commuter rail or ferry) ports-of-entry remain open to non-essential travel.

There are no quarantine-on-arrival requirements at the nationwide level, but individual states and/or cities may have their own requirements. You will need to confirm with information from your destination state or city. As an example, this is New York State's travel advisory/quarantine page (soon to be replaced by an option to shorten quarantines via testing); as you will discover there, *traveler

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Coronavirus Megathread (Late Oct 2020): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel – with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible – /r/travel is shifting to semi-monthly megathreads until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA – or this alternative site that draws information from IATA. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history. The land borders with Mexico and Canada are closed to all except those travelling for essential purposes, but air, rail, and sea (but not commuter rail or ferry) ports-of-entry remain open to non-essential travel.

There are no quarantine-on-arrival requirements at the nationwide level, but individual states and/or cities may have their own requirements. You will need to confirm with information from your destination state or city. As an example, this is New York State's travel advisory/quarantine page; as you will discover there, *travelers are permitted to break quarantine to leave New York State and the state's quarantine restrictions would not prevent you from boarding a connecti

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👍︎ 23
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Coronavirus Megathread (Early Oct 2020): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel – with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible – /r/travel is shifting to semi-monthly megathreads until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA – or this alternative site that draws information from IATA. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history. The land borders with Mexico and Canada are closed to all except those travelling for essential purposes, but air, rail, and sea (but not commuter rail or ferry) ports-of-entry remain open to non-essential travel.

There are no quarantine-on-arrival requirements at the nationwide level, but individual states and/or cities may have their own requirements. You will need to confirm with information from your destination state or city.

For more information, see the US CDC's COVID-19 page.

...in Canada?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are barred from entering Canada unless they are traveling for essential reasons, regardless of mode of travel. Those traveling from

... keep reading on reddit ➡

👍︎ 26
📰︎ r/travel
💬︎
📅︎ Oct 01 2020
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Coronavirus Megathread (Late Sep 2020): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel – with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible – /r/travel is shifting to semi-monthly megathreads until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA – or this alternative site that draws information from IATA. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history. The land borders with Mexico and Canada are closed to all except those travelling for essential purposes, but air, rail, and sea (but not commuter rail or ferry) ports-of-entry remain open to non-essential travel.

For more information, see the US CDC's COVID-19 page.

...in Canada?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are barred from entering Canada unless they are traveling for essential reasons, regardless of mode of travel. Those traveling from countries other than the US must also fulfill one of several additional categories of exemptions. Those who are permitted to travel to Canada for non-essential purposes include, aside from Canadians, permanent residents. F

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👍︎ 40
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🚨︎ report
Coronavirus Megathread (Late Aug 2020): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

Please continue discussion in the new megathread [as of September 1].


As the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel – with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible – /r/travel is shifting to semi-monthly megathreads until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA – or this alternative site that draws information from IATA. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history. The land borders with Mexico and Canada are closed to all except those travelling for essential purposes, but air, rail, and sea (but not commuter rail or ferry) ports-of-entry remain open to non-essential travel.

For more information, see the US CDC's COVID-19 page.

...in Canada?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are barred from entering Canada unless they are traveling for essential reasons, regardless of mode of travel. Those traveling from countries other than the US must also fulfill on

... keep reading on reddit ➡

👍︎ 45
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💬︎
📅︎ Aug 16 2020
🚨︎ report
Coronavirus Megathread (Early Sep 2020): For travel-related discussion in the context of COVID-19

Please continue discussion in the new megathread [as of September 16].


As the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation continues to have a major effect on travel – with many now looking to understand if, when, or how their travels might be feasible – /r/travel is shifting to semi-monthly megathreads until the crisis dissipates.

In the interest of reducing the number of one-off questions, before you post a question about how to deal with your individual travel plans, consider whether your situation is adequately addressed by the following:

Are borders open? What entry or transit restrictions are in place? Will I need to quarantine?

A list of travel restrictions can be found in a number of sources, including from IATA – or this alternative site that draws information from IATA. Note that IATA only deals with travel restrictions by air (so it will not speak to any land border restrictions or closures).

You may also do well to check out government and embassy sources from the destination country (and sometimes from your own embassy in the destination country). Because information can change on short notice, it is important to verify the latest information, ideally from government sources.

...in the US?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are prohibited from entering or transiting the US if they have been in or transited via Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the Schengen Area, or the UK in the preceding 14 days. Exceptions to this rule include green card holders. Note that (except for, of course, US citizens) this is not a citizenship-based restriction; it is purely based on travel history. The land borders with Mexico and Canada are closed to all except those travelling for essential purposes, but air, rail, and sea (but not commuter rail or ferry) ports-of-entry remain open to non-essential travel.

For more information, see the US CDC's COVID-19 page.

...in Canada?

At the time of writing, foreign nationals are barred from entering Canada unless they are traveling for essential reasons, regardless of mode of travel. Those traveling from countries other than the US must also fulfill on

... keep reading on reddit ➡

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Visa free (or on arrival) countries for spouse of EU citizen

Anyone has experience (or knows) which countries can a relative of EU citizen go without having to apply for visa in the embassy in advance? I know UK (of of course Schengen areas) has that policy, but any other countries?

👍︎ 2
📰︎ r/travel
💬︎
📅︎ Dec 27 2020
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Visa free (or on arrival) countries for spouse of EU citizen

Anyone has experience (or knows) which countries can a relative of EU citizen (3rd World citizen with rather weak passport) go without having to apply for visa in the embassy in advance? I know UK (of of course Schengen areas) has that policy, but any other countries?

👍︎ 2
💬︎
📅︎ Dec 27 2020
🚨︎ report
Visa free (or on arrival) countries for spouse of EU citizen

Anyone has experience (or knows) which countries can a relative of EU citizen (3rd World citizen with rather weak passport) go without having to apply for visa in the embassy in advance? I know UK (of of course Schengen areas) has that policy, but any other countries?

👍︎ 2
📰︎ r/visas
💬︎
📅︎ Dec 27 2020
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I understand EU requires member countries to secure their borders. Would Ireland be required to secure its border with Northern Ireland?

According to the EU, All EU States have to make investments to protect their external borders in the interest of the entire Schengen Area.. Since the UK is not part of the Schengen area, would Ireland be required to secure the border?

👍︎ 5
📰︎ r/brexit
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👤︎ u/pryoslice
📅︎ Mar 22 2019
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