How do I patch big hole in the lath and plaster wall where an outlet used to be?

https://imgur.com/a/t8iU14j

I’ve got two of these holes in the same room, believe it or not.

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πŸ‘€︎ u/landops
πŸ“…︎ Feb 13
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Soundproofing over lath and plaster- retaining ceiling

So I’m going to soundproof the ceiling in my flat with Genie clips, and acoustic plasterboard. Partly because the artex ceiling is gross, partly for soundproofing.

Soundstop told me to retain the lath and plaster because it’s messy, and has good acoustic mass. Then use genie clips and 50mm rockwool, then double layer of acoustic plasterboard.

Sound proofing store told me to get rid of it to backfill the space between the joists with insulation before doing a suspended ceiling off the joists.

Anyone done anything similar? Which would be better

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πŸ‘€︎ u/adamneigeroc
πŸ“…︎ Mar 08
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Downlights in lath and plaster roof?

How do I put Downlighting in a lath and plaster FLAT ceiling? I can’t access from above as it’s a bathroom extension on the second floor with a tiled flat roof.

I really don’t want to rip down the lath and plaster ceiling if possible but can’t see a way to chase in the electrics and a strong structure to hold the led sockets?

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πŸ‘€︎ u/boozingislosing
πŸ“…︎ Jan 24
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Lath & Plaster walls and insulation

Our house is a 2-story house with a basement and a finished attic built in the 30s. We're renovating the kitchen and dining room (half of the 1st floor) which means we're removing the lath and plaster walls, re-framing, insulating with closed cell spray foam and then drywall.

Given that the remainder of the house is uninsulated block/brick with lath and plaster walls, does it make sense to to get the kitchen and dining room walls insulation as high as we can with closed cell foam in the framing bays? Or just apply some insulation given that the rest of the house is not insulated?

I've heard that lath and plaster is a better at insulation than bare drywall but haven't seen an estimated R-value for that type of wall by itself.

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πŸ‘€︎ u/atophigh
πŸ“…︎ Feb 23
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1944 broad sheet newspaper found in lath and plaster wall during refurb
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Scubainnies
πŸ“…︎ Feb 24
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Installing chandelier in plaster and lath ceilings β€” crumbling

We removed the ceiling fan from our dining room and are attempting to install a basic chandelier. As we are installing the bracket, the edges of the hole are beginning to crumble and in some spots the internal plaster is beginning to crumble. We're afraid to proceed because with the crumbling the hole is becoming too large for the bracket. The bracket is currently screwed in but is loose because we can't get the screws to go in any further. What can we do?

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πŸ‘€︎ u/econnomy15
πŸ“…︎ Feb 04
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How to patch holes in lath and plaster walls and match texture?

https://imgur.com/a/6IFBaSW

I have a few holes in in my walls which I believe to be lath and plaster but correct me if I'm wrong. They came when I tried to hang a painting on the wall, the plaster was really brittle and it took the third time to get the nail to hold. I've since removed the painting and now need to patch the damage to the walls. I'm not all that familiar with patching plaster walls and am wondering if this is a repair I can do. The plaster has a bit of a sandy texture like there are large grains within it. Is it possible for me to patch this wall and match the texture, further is it possible to match the color? The walls aren't painted but I don't know if the color will still be impossible to match without redoing the entire surface.

What exactly would this kind of repair entail and is it something I can do myself or do I need to call a professional? Thanks.

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πŸ‘€︎ u/Race464
πŸ“…︎ Feb 03
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Water damage to lath and plaster ceiling

Hello

Last week, my plumber forgot to check the drain valve on an unvented hot water cylinder (loft) and that evening, it leaked a considerable amount of water into the room below.

The ceiling is a lath and plaster one, possibly with some plaster/wall board on top. After the leak, the ceiling had bulged considerably, but now, 1.5w after, it has shrunk back some, but not completely. Sticking a level on it shows a 1-2cm bulge.

My question, how concerned should I be? And should this be covered by the plumber's insurance?

My concern is that even though it feels solid, it's still a little cold/damp, and this would have weakened the plaster, and it may fall down in the future with vibrations/impact long after the plumber has sailed off into the sunset.

Thanks for any and all insight.

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πŸ‘€︎ u/arrkaye
πŸ“…︎ Feb 02
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Lath and Plaster Wall Repair

I just bought a (100+year old) home with lath and plaster walls. The walls are in reasonable condition, but there are many cracks which have been poorly patched over the years. I've done drywall repair plenty of times before and am comfortable scraping out, filling, taping etc. to make on drywall. Question is - can I use regular drywall jointing compound or quickset on plaster? Are there special types for this application or specific brands/types to avoid?

Also, this Plaster Magic product is recommended in a few places (eg. this old house) for re-attaching the plaster where keys are broken. Is it as good as advertised? Much more expensive than using the older style plaster washers, happy to pay if it's really worth it.

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πŸ‘€︎ u/s-gardo
πŸ“…︎ Nov 15 2020
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1958 Kitchen Gut Reno - Lath and Plaster Wall

Hello all,

We are gut renovating our 1958 kitchen. The whole house is lath and plaster. The kitchen walls are basically this plasterboard and double-thick brick walls. From what I read, plasterboard is insulating. This plasterboard is quite old and there’s some chunks missing from the demo. Should we take it all down, frame (there’s no studs now), insulate and put up drywall? We will be hanging some cabinets and shelves. Or should we fill these holes with more plaster? First-time gut reno of an old house and have no idea what to do with this kind of construction.

Photos: https://imgur.com/gallery/yjOjEfJ

Thank you!

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πŸ‘€︎ u/snusmumrik3000
πŸ“…︎ Jan 31
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Anyone have any experience dealing with crumbling lath and plaster walls?

My house was built in 1916 (I think) and the upstairs dividing wall that is against the stairs is lath and plaster with gross yellow wallpaper over it from the β€˜70s. The plaster along the bottom of the wall has been crumbling for a couple of years, and it’s just been getting worse. I’m a bit worried about the structural integrity of the wall. Is there any way to stop the crumbling? I haven’t found much online other than straight up replacing it with drywall, which isn’t in the budget at this moment (unfortunately)

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πŸ‘€︎ u/WelcomeHomeBitch
πŸ“…︎ Feb 01
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I found this wall in my 'porch' was just lath and plaster. It wasn't looking great so I pulled it down and replaced it with concrete tile backer-board. What can I use to render/skim over it to make it smooth?
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πŸ‘€︎ u/mightypenguin66
πŸ“…︎ Dec 09 2020
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Frameless / architrave-less door, how to achieve this? 1930s plaster and lath home. Image link below.

Doors around the house without molding

I love my doors. In the kitchen during a remodel they added a frame and probably changed out the plaster walls for drywall. It looks extremely busy because it’s in a cramped spot. I would love to remove the molding/architrave around the door and make the jamb flush with the wall. I’m guessing I would use rounded shoe molding. Maybe patch between the molding and drywall with something flexible, like DAP’s elastopatch so that it doesn’t crack?

Plan

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πŸ‘€︎ u/beeb80
πŸ“…︎ Dec 22 2020
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Looking for advice insulating a 70 year old lath and plaster house.

Hi everyone, quick question looking for some advice on renovating walls/insulating. My wife and I bought this old lath+plaster home. It's in decent shape but winters here will be very cold and the upstairs is pretty wonky. We've decided to renovate one of three bedrooms entirely in order to see what we're up against. I've attached a link to the current outside wall that we opened up a bit. When we bought the place, the walls were the cheap wood panelling, over 4 coats of wallpaper, over the lath and plaster. For the internal walls, after that it is simply the stud and then next room's wall across from what I just described. On the EXTERNAL walls, there is some decent wooden boards which are hammered to the studs (seems like Hemlock to me), and then beyond those beefy studs, the external wall begins.

My question is, would anyone recommend tearing down the existing wooden boards to reveal the studs, then putting in the insulation and finishing it up with drywall, or should I keep those boards and build some new studs on top of them, to then insulate and drywall. I didn't mind taking the plaster down, but it seems a shame to take down these nice boards if they might further help insulate/soundproof/keep me from having to do any more demolition. I don't mind losing square footage that new studs and drywall will occupy. Any suggestions on the course of action I should take? I would be glad to hear that putting up a new layer of studs will be some kind of awesome super insulated structure, but I also realize it may cause some weird condensation or some other issues that I don't know much about.

Here's the link

https://ibb.co/Kzq9ny7

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πŸ‘€︎ u/Asicaster
πŸ“…︎ Sep 13 2020
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Is This Plaster and Lath?

Hey All,

I just recently moved into an old (before 1907) house and got an electrician to add some outlets into some rooms and replace some knob and tube. Some of the rooms (where there were recent renovations according to the seller) went as expected (studs, drywall). A few rooms, however, they were still able to add outlets but ran into some...interesting walls when making holes to run wires.

The pieces they took out of the wall have a small layer of white, crumbly substance some of which has exposed mesh. I’m assuming this is plaster. The more intriguing part is what is immediately behind the plaster. It seems to be just solid wood. Not solid wood in strips with some β€œkey” like all the pictures I see online of plaster and lath. So what are my walls made out of? Is it easy to patch the holes (while maintaining the wood backing)? Ideally I would want to patch the holes in a structurally sound way and would hope that could somehow reincorporate/replace the wood but I don’t know if that will be costly or possible

The wood is about 7/8” thick. The plaster on top is maybe 1/8 or 1/4 inch.

Some images are here

[EDIT] Some additional images here

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πŸ‘€︎ u/EncodedNybble
πŸ“…︎ Oct 30 2020
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On another post, I raised some theories about this β€œbarn” on a property I bought. The inside has signs of it being used as a dwelling or more finished structure (the lath and plaster walls). Name and date on the walls suggest β€œ1872” build. Anyone familiar with old structures, please chime in! reddit.com/gallery/iyy4ov
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πŸ‘€︎ u/domsaturday
πŸ“…︎ Sep 24 2020
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Lath and Plaster Repair

Anyone have recommendations for a lath and plaster repair company/person in the Everett area. Just took out all my knob and tube wiring and need to patch up the holes left behind.

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πŸ‘€︎ u/fox3r
πŸ“…︎ Dec 05 2020
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Lath and Plaster in the middle of a wall cavity

Would anyone have a clue why I would have lath and plaster in the middle of a wall cavity in addition to the normal location? This wasn't necessarily finished smooth either. It was filled in and just a rough finished. Noise control? Fire control? It is on inside and outside walls so that, to me, rules out using it as insulation.

Thoughts?

https://preview.redd.it/ae4dfytx5ro51.jpg?width=3456&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=7b51a00e6236e20c8e25b5be764effe835397e6e

https://preview.redd.it/i9khdxtx5ro51.jpg?width=3456&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=c1fa79235b8e49bb97e27b911a42a27ea35d799e

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πŸ‘€︎ u/orourkean
πŸ“…︎ Sep 22 2020
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I'm turning to the experts! Is my wall going to alright? It looks like the lath and plaster can't support it, it is only in that section now where else. What can be done? reddit.com/gallery/iylklp
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Youhurtmypee
πŸ“…︎ Sep 23 2020
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Hanging Heavy Things on Plaster and Lath

I moved into my 1920 bungalow 5 months ago and I’ve loved putting up pictures with just a nail. But now I want to install a pot rack in my kitchen on the wall. I imagine I’ll need some kind of anchor. Any recommendations? Obviously if I hit a stud I don’t use an anchor. How do I know if I’m hitting a stud? Does a stud finder work? Any help is appreciated.

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πŸ‘€︎ u/Mobilematt1
πŸ“…︎ Oct 19 2020
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Repairing doorway that is plaster and lath

There is a doorway that seperates my dining room and living room. A few months ago I installed an expandable pet gate to keep my dog in the other half of the house. A few weeks ago someone tried to step over the gate and ripped it out of the wall.

My chief concern is the repair. There is now a rather sizeable crater and a hole in my wall.

Throughout my house I was told that there is drywall over all of the lath and plaster. However, in this doorway, I believe it is just plaster and lath (I am not sure).

(1) How would I go about repairing this if it is just plaster/lath? This means that I drilled a hole into a lath. Is this an issue?

(2) If it is drywall over the plaster and lath, I understand the process of repairing the drywall. However, what will I need to do about the plaster/lath?

I would like to put the gate back up. Unfortunately, the hole is exactly where it needs to be. My doorway is more narrow on one side than the other. Due to the position of other things in the room, I need to repair the hole exactly where it is at.

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πŸ‘€︎ u/ortl
πŸ“…︎ Oct 24 2020
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I cannot find the studs in my plaster and lath home

Today I went and bought one of these neodymium magnets

This house was supposedly built in the 1950s (MI) and I read with older homes that this can be a clever way of finding the nail lines for the lath into the studs. I have been dragging this magnet flat against walls with no luck.

I even went into some attic space beyond the upstairs knee wall to see the backside of my bedroom, the studs are 16" o.c. and i located one from the other side but still the magnet doesn't seem to react to anything.

Do I need a different magnet? Or does lath not get nailed to every stud?


Additional info- from the attic space I can see they used 2x4 studs @16", these are typical 1.5"x3.5", (I'm assuming they used 2x4s throughout) and the walls are 5.5" thick.

subtract the 3.5" for the stud, the 1/2" for two layers of lath (either side of the wall), that leaves 3/4" of plaster PER SIDE! Maybe lath is 1/2" thick boards? this just seems like a lot of material...

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πŸ‘€︎ u/eggs-benedict
πŸ“…︎ Jul 28 2020
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Fixing cracks and loose plaster and lath walls

I recently bought a hundred year-old house with horsehair plaster and lath throughout and have a couple of questions about materials.

There is a number of hairline cracks and the walls are slightly loose to the touch in places but not with any visible crumbling or very much give.

I have a fair bit of experience taping/patching sheet rock, but after getting up close, I'm thinking the all-purpose joint compound homedepot recommended isn't going to cut it.

After reading up, it sounds like I want something like Easy Sand 45 for the bigger cracks and can get away with a silicone painters caulk for the small stuff, or is that not a good idea?

Second, is there a way to re-adhere the plaster to the lath other than using big willy's or tearing out what seems to be otherwise solid plaster? I'm leary of using the washer method because it seems like a band-aid fix. Would some kind of wood glue or adhesive caulk work as a lasting fix?

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πŸ‘€︎ u/hashtag_alex13
πŸ“…︎ Oct 05 2020
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Mounting a TV on a lath and plaster wall.

Let me preface the question with the fact that I know next to nothing about home improvement.

With that being said, the question is that if I missed mounting the TV on the studs and it is instead mounted on the lath boards, will they hold the TV?

I bought a stud finder but it was completely and totally useless and didn't help me. So I went with the whole "knock on the wall" thing and I THINK I found the studs. Because I got wood pieces on my drill.

But I am paranoid and also think the TV may be mounted on lath boards. Because I didn't know at the time that my wall was lath and plaster as opposed to drywall.

Long story short, I pulled down on the wall mount prior to hanging the TV and it seemed pretty secure. Also the TV has been on the wall for a couple days and shows no signs of falling.

So again, if the TV is secured on lath boards, is this no good at all and should I buy a good stud finder and recheck?

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πŸ‘€︎ u/NicCageInACage
πŸ“…︎ Dec 17 2019
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Lath and plaster experts: would it be common to find it in a barn?

I was exploring one of my barns today. Rumor has it, the barn is older than the house on the property. The beams are hand hewn oak with wood peg fasteners, and there are wormy chestnut floorboards and siding throughout.

I found several names painted/tarred onto a plaster wall in the barn today. The names are some of the early townspeople (according to census data and atlas photos that I’ve reviewed). Interestingly, there appears to be a signed date on the wall: β€œ1872.”

I know lath and plaster was common up until 1900. But my question is this: would it be common in a barn?

Am I right to suspect that this might not have been a β€œbarn” originally? In other words, someone was living here. I’m suspicious because it has tell tale signs of a dwelling (well nearby-approx. 20 ft), lath and plaster walls on first floor only, etc. The house that I live in has a build date of 1893. Could it be possible that someone was living in the barn for 20 years before the house was built? If not, what would explain there being 2 barns on a relatively small tract of land (3 acres) without a house for 20 years?

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πŸ‘€︎ u/domsaturday
πŸ“…︎ Sep 24 2020
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Fixing up my first house. Getting rid of the old lath and plaster. Love it when the previous owner is a DIY framing master.
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πŸ‘€︎ u/gusard21
πŸ“…︎ Jun 17 2020
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Old house help- ISO someone to strip old (layered) wallpaper and repair what we think is lath and plaster walls in one bedroom.

There’s enough folks with weird old houses in Ithaca that I’m hoping someone knows someone (who knows someone?) who has experience and wants a little gig like this!

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πŸ‘€︎ u/ny_AU
πŸ“…︎ Jul 15 2020
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Removing lath and plaster to replace with drywall. Anyone got tips or recommendations for me?

Room is about 12Γ—18

Curious what other peoples experience with removing lath has been like

Quick edit:

My fiance and I wanted to redo this bedroom because it's the largest in the house and we wanted as our master bedroom. We wanted to to all the renovations we needed to do first though. The bedroom is adjacent to a busy-ish road so we were hoping to get a bit more sound proofing. As I have written back to some commenters , we currently have popcorn texture on the walls and ceiling that my fiance despises (I'm also not a fan) , we started removing it in the ceiling and some walls to find cracks and a bit of chipping in the plaster. Not what I would call extensive , but enough of it that it's quite the eye sore . You guys have given me a lot to think about and that's why I posted , to make sure I wasnt going to jump into and commit myself to a pain in the ass project . Also , major props to this community for always being helpful , I've only asked a couple questions here , but am always met with respect and well thought out responses . I'll do my best to return the love and answer questions I'm knowledgeable on. Thanks a lot guys

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πŸ“…︎ Nov 05 2019
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Repairing metal lath and plaster ceiling

Sometime during the previous owners' tenure, the electrical panel and some cables have been replaced. However, this left my garage ceiling with a few unsightly holes that are also difficult to patch since the cables go through there.

Amazing work in all its glory: https://imgur.com/a/6HTygHb

Unfortunately, I need to repair them since I am getting free blown-in insulation from MassSave after a home energy inspection.

The ceiling is metal lath and plaster with some decorative work on it. I have been repairing smaller holes with joint compound and bigger ones with a metal mesh and joint compound.

I am at a loss with those holes though due to being so close to cables and how they were done (there were some bricks knocked down on the wall to make this monstrosity, which I saved and I can use if needed).

My current plan is:

  • Remove the old metal lath that has been folded inside the ceiling.
  • Use the old metal lath or a new metal mesh as close as possible to the cables but not touching them.
  • Go over with joint compound.
  • Fill the rest of the hole that remains with pink insulation.
  • Cover the insulation with a small wooden box I will make so it's not fluffy pink material on white wall and prevent rodents from thinking I made them a cozy bed.

Does this make sense or is there some other technique I can follow? Thanks in advance!

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πŸ‘€︎ u/ipapadop
πŸ“…︎ Jul 18 2020
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Ceiling Fan Install in 1920s home with ceiling tiles and Plaster and Lath

My home was built in the early 20s. I'm wanting to put a ceiling fan in the living room.

Located in Southern Illinois

I've got a few concerns before I start drilling holes and was looking for advice.

My walls are mortar and lath, and I'm assuming the ceiling is as well. But my ceiling has those 16"x16" ceiling tiles on it. I know it has to be furred out, and I'm not 100% sure there is mortar on it.

I do NOT have access in the attic to the location directly above the ceiling fan, as it's underneath an upstairs bedrooms floor. I can about 5' from the proposed location in the attic entrance.

I was just going to drill a 4" hole in the middle of the room and use one of the Saf T braces. The rafters are 16" on center.

My concern is, that there is going to be a height difference between the furred out ceiling tiles and the underside of the lath (where the Saf T brace would rest), resulting in the box most likely not setting flush with the ceiling....

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πŸ‘€︎ u/cturboaddict
πŸ“…︎ May 09 2020
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Looking for advice insulating a 70 year old lath and plaster house.

Hi everyone, quick question looking for some advice on renovating walls/insulating. My wife and I bought this old lath+plaster home. It's in decent shape but winters here will be very cold and the upstairs is pretty wonky. We've decided to renovate one of three bedrooms entirely in order to see what we're up against. I've attached a link to the current outside wall that we opened up a bit. When we bought the place, the walls were the cheap wood panelling, over 4 coats of wallpaper, over the lath and plaster. For the internal walls, after that it is simply the stud and then next room's wall across from what I just described. On the EXTERNAL walls, there is some decent wooden boards which are hammered to the studs (seems like Hemlock to me), and then beyond those beefy studs, the external wall begins.

My question is, would anyone recommend tearing down the existing wooden boards to reveal the studs, then putting in the insulation and finishing it up with drywall, or should I keep those boards and build some new studs on top of them, to then insulate and drywall. I didn't mind taking the plaster down, but it seems a shame to take down these nice boards if they might further help insulate/soundproof/keep me from having to do any more demolition. I don't mind losing square footage that new studs and drywall will occupy. Any suggestions on the course of action I should take? I would be glad to hear that putting up a new layer of studs will be some kind of awesome super insulated structure, but I also realize it may cause some weird condensation or some other issues that I don't know much about.

Here's the link

https://ibb.co/Kzq9ny7

πŸ‘︎ 3
πŸ“°︎ r/homeowners
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πŸ‘€︎ u/Asicaster
πŸ“…︎ Sep 13 2020
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Looking for advice insulating a 70 year old lath and plaster house.

Hi everyone, quick question looking for some advice on renovating walls/insulating. My wife and I bought this old lath+plaster home. It's in decent shape but winters here will be very cold and the upstairs is pretty wonky. We've decided to renovate one of three bedrooms entirely in order to see what we're up against. I've attached a link to the current outside wall that we opened up a bit. When we bought the place, the walls were the cheap wood panelling, over 4 coats of wallpaper, over the lath and plaster. For the internal walls, after that it is simply the stud and then next room's wall across from what I just described. On the EXTERNAL walls, there is some decent wooden boards which are hammered to the studs (seems like Hemlock to me), and then beyond those beefy studs, the external wall begins.

My question is, would anyone recommend tearing down the existing wooden boards to reveal the studs, then putting in the insulation and finishing it up with drywall, or should I keep those boards and build some new studs on top of them, to then insulate and drywall. I didn't mind taking the plaster down, but it seems a shame to take down these nice boards if they might further help insulate/soundproof/keep me from having to do any more demolition. I don't mind losing square footage that new studs and drywall will occupy. Any suggestions on the course of action I should take? I would be glad to hear that putting up a new layer of studs will be some kind of awesome super insulated structure, but I also realize it may cause some weird condensation or some other issues that I don't know much about.

Here's the link

https://ibb.co/Kzq9ny7

πŸ‘︎ 2
πŸ“°︎ r/Renovations
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/Asicaster
πŸ“…︎ Sep 13 2020
🚨︎ report
Looking for advice insulating a 70 year old lath and plaster house.

Hi everyone, quick question looking for some advice on renovating walls/insulating. My wife and I bought this old lath+plaster home. It's in decent shape but winters here will be very cold and the upstairs is pretty wonky. We've decided to renovate one of three bedrooms entirely in order to see what we're up against. I've attached a link to the current outside wall that we opened up a bit. When we bought the place, the walls were the cheap wood panelling, over 4 coats of wallpaper, over the lath and plaster. For the internal walls, after that it is simply the stud and then next room's wall across from what I just described. On the EXTERNAL walls, there is some decent wooden boards which are hammered to the studs (seems like Hemlock to me), and then beyond those beefy studs, the external wall begins.

My question is, would anyone recommend tearing down the existing wooden boards to reveal the studs, then putting in the insulation and finishing it up with drywall, or should I keep those boards and build some new studs on top of them, to then insulate and drywall. I didn't mind taking the plaster down, but it seems a shame to take down these nice boards if they might further help insulate/soundproof/keep me from having to do any more demolition. I don't mind losing square footage that new studs and drywall will occupy. Any suggestions on the course of action I should take? I would be glad to hear that putting up a new layer of studs will be some kind of awesome super insulated structure, but I also realize it may cause some weird condensation or some other issues that I don't know much about.

Here's the link

https://ibb.co/Kzq9ny7

πŸ‘︎ 3
πŸ“°︎ r/HomeImprovement
πŸ’¬︎
πŸ‘€︎ u/Asicaster
πŸ“…︎ Sep 13 2020
🚨︎ report

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